Open Thread: Don’t ever wear artistic jewelry…

Have any of you noticed the amount of fun geeky jewelery around at the moment? I for one have pink laptop earrings which I got from Claire’s in the US last month, HTML head tag earrings from Etsy, and today I picked up a pacman and ghost necklace pair from Diva in Australia.

Oh. And then there is my small army of robot necklaces.

Flickr / elkbuntu / creative commons attribution 2.o

Robots 1 “Lanky”, 3 “Pinky” and 4 “Brain” are from Diva in Australia. Robot 2 “Steamy” was from Bling in New Zealand last week. The 2, 3 and 4 should still be available, and in fact today I saw a ‘Best Friends’ version of Pinky, where he’s with an inversed black-with-pink-eyes friend.

I’m sure Colette would forgive me for this collection.

As this is an Open Thread, you’re welcome to post links to things you’ve found (…like moar robots for me?) and discuss issues other than geeky jewelry. It’s up to you!

14 thoughts on “Open Thread: Don’t ever wear artistic jewelry…

    1. Susan

      It’s not a huge help, but it’s fairly simple and inexpensive to take pierced-ear-earrings and convert them to clip ons. I’ve bought a bunch of clip on / screw on backings from a local beading store, and most earrings can be disassembled an reassembled with a small pair of pliers and perhaps some extra wire, depending on their construction. Alternatively, skip the original earrings entirely and buy just the charms to put on your preferred earring backs!

  1. Barbara

    I’m a software engineer. My name is Barbara, but most of my friends call me Barbie. So of course I have Computer Engineer Barbie proudly displayed on my desk. My current quest is to acquire an adult-sized version of the “funky tee with binary code design”. I may need to contact ThinkGeek to see if they’ll print it. Any other ideas for how to get the shirt?

  2. Nightsky

    There are many artists on Etsy I like, but only a few in the category of “Please send me one of everything, and then please stop being so awesome, because I’m out of money.”
    One of these is a person calling hirself Jewelsvine, at http://www.etsy.com/shop/jewelsvine . (No affiliation with hir beyond being a very satisfied and much poorer customer.) It is solid geek, and also solid awesome. Behold the robot. The alien-on-television locket. The articulated teddy bear bot! The retro rocket locket, which doesn’t seem to be in stock but is visible in the banner, and which I must stop myself from wearing ALL THE TIME! The teensy keys!
    One of everything, please.

    1. Marie

      I’ve seen Jewelsvine’s work at the Nelson Market here in NZ – such gorgeous work … to very expensive D:

  3. Maile

    I recently started a small company selling math, science, and technology themed jewelry, Boutique Academia (boutiqueacademia.com), and these are my observations on this trend:

    1. There is a decent sized (I won’t say huge yet), untapped market out there of very smart women in STEM fields, with relatively few large scale jewelry/apparel-related products targeted at them. I only opened a month ago, and I’ve already had enough success that I am hoping to expand my product line after the holidays. I think that we will see more companies catering to geek women in the near future. Everyone gets all excited when ThinkGeek releases two women-oriented t-shirts, but really there needs to be way more out there for women. (FYI, one new company making cool geeky t-shirts for women is RationalGirl rationalgirl.com…and hopefully they do well, because ThinkGeek and the other guy-centric geek accessories companies don’t quite get the women’s t-shirt market yet.)

    2. It’s starting to be cool to be smart now, and women (and teenagers/girls) are starting to show off those smarts in their jewelry and clothing. I think that the “geek chic” movement will temper and be incorporated into normal, average, everyday style, leaving an acceptability to just dress in ways that display one’s intellectual interests.

    3. In addition, it’s becoming possible for geeky to also be classy and beautiful. When I was in college, if I didn’t look the nerd part (big glasses, frumpy, etc.) then my classmates and professors wouldn’t take me seriously. It was like I had to hide any vestige of femininity to be an acceptable math major. Now, I think that is changing, which is great because I think it will be helpful for teenage girls to know that they can be themselves and be smart…that they don’t have to fit into the “nerd” image to be good at math and science.

    All of this is a long way of saying that, in my opinion, geeky jewelry is moving from fringe to cool. :-)

  4. Liz

    I really like the jewelry from TransistorSister on Etsy! Etsy never has enough stuff made out of computer bits. I look for it frequently and am probably going to just have to make my own at some point.

  5. Stevie.Marie

    After reading about your laptop earrings at Claire’s, I found a pair of my own while doing some holiday shopping. Quite possibly the geekiest jewelry I have (so far). I love them! Thanks for the tip!

  6. Moose

    Hey folks, something unrelated to anything:

    Yahoo! is trying to sell off Delicious, which really has been mangled since they bought it from the original creator(s) (in my unhumble opinion). Meanwhile people are deserting in droves, because only Jeebus and Cthulhu know what will happen to it now.

    If you’d like to move may I (again unhumbly) suggest http://pinboard.in/ ? It is a lot like what old skool Del.icio.us was like [as it’s sort of spun off from early delicious code], it’s easy to transfer things (although imports are currently taking about 8 hrs for a full import), and it can sync with a pile of other sites including delicious.

    There are of course other sites; I just happen to miss the old Del.icio.us and as such like Pinboard.

    Take care, all.

    1. Mary

      It’s going to be a hard choice: people are all moving to different bookmarking sites as far as we can tell. (And what happened to Ma.gnolia scares me: how many of these sites are being run out of someone’s bedroom?)

  7. Sharron Clemons

    I recently started a small company selling math, science, and technology themed jewelry, Boutique Academia (boutiqueacademia.com), and these are my observations on this trend: 1. There is a decent sized (I won’t say huge yet), untapped market out there of very smart women in STEM fields, with relatively few large scale jewelry/apparel-related products targeted at them. I only opened a month ago, and I’ve already had enough success that I am hoping to expand my product line after the holidays. I think that we will see more companies catering to geek women in the near future. Everyone gets all excited when ThinkGeek releases two women-oriented t-shirts, but really there needs to be way more out there for women. (FYI, one new company making cool geeky t-shirts for women is RationalGirl rationalgirl.com…and hopefully they do well, because ThinkGeek and the other guy-centric geek accessories companies don’t quite get the women’s t-shirt market yet.) 2. It’s starting to be cool to be smart now, and women (and teenagers/girls) are starting to show off those smarts in their jewelry and clothing. I think that the “geek chic” movement will temper and be incorporated into normal, average, everyday style, leaving an acceptability to just dress in ways that display one’s intellectual interests. 3. In addition, it’s becoming possible for geeky to also be classy and beautiful. When I was in college, if I didn’t look the nerd part (big glasses, frumpy, etc.) then my classmates and professors wouldn’t take me seriously. It was like I had to hide any vestige of femininity to be an acceptable math major. Now, I think that is changing, which is great because I think it will be helpful for teenage girls to know that they can be themselves and be smart…that they don’t have to fit into the “nerd” image to be good at math and science. All of this is a long way of saying that, in my opinion, geeky jewelry is moving from fringe to cool. :-)

  8. Latoya Bridges

    It’s not a huge help, but it’s fairly simple and inexpensive to take pierced-ear-earrings and convert them to clip ons. I’ve bought a bunch of clip on / screw on backings from a local beading store, and most earrings can be disassembled an reassembled with a small pair of pliers and perhaps some extra wire, depending on their construction. Alternatively, skip the original earrings entirely and buy just the charms to put on your preferred earring backs!

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