GF classifieds (April to June 2012)

This is another round of Geek feminism classifieds. If you’re looking to hire women, find some people to participate in your study, find female speakers, or just want some like-minded folk to join your open source project, this is the thread for you!

Here’s how it works:

  1. Geeky subjects only. We take a wide view of geekdom, but if your thing isn’t related to an obviously geeky topic, you’ll probably want to give a bit of background on why the readers of Geek Feminism would be interested.
  2. Explain what your project/event/thing is, or link to a webpage that provides clear, informative information about it. Ideally you’ll also explain why geek women might find it particularly awesome.
  3. Explain what you’re looking for. Even if it’s not a job ad, think of it like one: what is the activity/role in question, and what would it involve? What is the profile of people you’re looking for?
  4. GF has international readership, so please be sure to indicate the location if you’re advertising a job position, conference, or other thing where the location matters. Remember that city acronyms aren’t always known world-wide and lots of cities share names, so be as clear as possible! (That is, don’t say “SF[O]” or “NYC” or “Melb”, say “San Francisco, USA”, “New York City, USA” or “Melbourne, Australia”.) And if you can provide travel/relocation assistance, we’d love to know about it.
  5. Keep it legal. Most jurisdictions do not allow you to (eg.) advertise jobs for only people of a given gender. So don’t do that. If you are advertising for something that falls into this category, think of this as an opportunity to boost the signal to women who might be interested.
  6. If you’re asking for participants in a study, please note Mary’s helpful guide to soliciting research participation on the ‘net, especially the “bare minimum” section.
  7. Provide a way for people to contact you, such as your email address or a link to apply in the case of job advertisements. (The email addresses entered in the comment form here are not public, so readers won’t see them.)
  8. Keep an eye on comments here, in case people ask for clarification or more details. (You can subscribe to comments via email or RSS.

If you’d like some more background/tips on how to reach out to women for your project/event/whatever, take a look at Recruiting women on the Geek Feminism Wiki.)

Good luck!

11 thoughts on “GF classifieds (April to June 2012)

  1. Mirabai Knight

    If any of you guys are looking to join an open source project, I’d love to get your help on Plover!

    Plover is the world’s first open source steno project, which lets you use either a $45 qwerty gaming keyboard or a $4,000 proprietary steno machine to interface directly with your OS (currently working on Linux and Windows, though the Linux version is a bit farther along) at speeds of up to 240 words per minute.

    Geek Feminism was kind enough to post on Plover back in 2010 (http://geekfeminism.org/2010/10/12/plover-freeing-stenography/), but we’ve come a long way since then.

    Some recent articles and videos:

    http://opensource.com/life/11/12/open-source-changes-face-stenography-and-possibilities-hearing-impaired

    http://plover.stenoknight.com/2011/11/captioned-mary-gardiners-keynote-at.html

    If you’re interested in contributing, our Current Tasks list is here: http://stenoknight.com/wiki/Status_of_current_tasks

    We’re looking for help with coding, documentation, promotion, hardware assembly, fundraising, and laying the groundwork for the steno tutorial arcade-style game suite (http://plover.stenoknight.com/2011/04/hover-plover.html) that’s going to be part 2 of the project, once the initial coding on Plover itself is pretty much complete.

    More details on the Plover Blog: http://plover.stenoknight.com/

  2. Kaye

    My answer to every problem is always, “Write an anthology!”
    Out of spending money? “Write an anthology!” In need of an arch-nemesis? “Write an anthology!” Terminally bored? “Write an anthology!”
    So when the lovely people at the Doctor Her blog started a campaign for a female Doctor, I responded with the following: “We should write a feminist science fiction anthology!”
    The theme of this proposed anthology would be “people who identify as female saving various bits of the world and/or universe.” I’d love to shoot for a similar feel to that of the anthology’s inspiration- madcap, vintage science fiction where anything can occur, with plenty of explosions, creepy monsters, time travel, spaceships, lovable secondary characters, and a quirky, intelligent woman as the focal character. The anthology will basically be a collection of different perspectives and variations on the same concept.
    The deadline for first drafts, barring unforeseen circumstances, will be September 1st. Stories should have a word count between 1,500 and 7,500, although we’ll also consider poetry on a case-by-case basis. Ideally, the anthology will be released in e-book format by mid-January at the latest. It’s unlikely that this project will have much of a budget, but contributors will receive royalties. If you’re interested, email k.bashe@yahoo.com.

  3. Kaye

    My answer to every problem is always, “Write an anthology!”
    Out of spending money? “Write an anthology!” In need of an arch-nemesis? “Write an anthology!” Terminally bored? “Write an anthology!”
    So when the lovely people at the Doctor Her blog started a campaign for a female Doctor, I responded with the following: “We should write a feminist science fiction anthology!”
    The theme of this proposed anthology would be “people who identify as female saving the world and/or universe.” I’d love to shoot for a similar feel to that of the anthology’s inspiration- madcap, vintage science fiction where anything can occur, with plenty of explosions, creepy monsters, time travel, spaceships, lovable secondary characters, and a quirky, intelligent woman as the focal character. The anthology will basically be a collection of different perspectives and variations on the same concept.
    The deadline for first drafts, barring unforeseen circumstances, will be September 1st. Stories should have a word count between 1,500 and 7,500, although we’ll also consider poetry on a case-by-case basis. Ideally, the anthology will be released in e-book format by mid-January at the latest. It’s unlikely that this project will have much of a budget, but contributors will receive royalties. If you’re interested, email k.bashe@yahoo.com.

  4. fookolt

    Pug Unit Games is looking for game programmers, 3D artists, 2D artists, level designers, and sound designers interested in working on EmergenceFPS, an indie multiplayer first-person-shooter for Windows and Mac OS X.

    As a diverse group of developers, we’re tired of the unending racial, sexual, and gender homogeneity and normativity in gaming and so we’ve been very aware in making sure EmergenceFPS subverts all those gazes and focuses on minority experiences and perspectives.

    Its science-fiction universe draws from Hindu mythology and post-colonial feminism while the gameplay draws from Battlefield and Tribes and is strongly focused on teamwork.

    We are rapidly closing in on our pre-alpha public release and are looking to bring in more developers. If you’re interested, please let us know!

    More information about EmergenceFPS here: http://pugunitgames.com/post/19022962697/emergencefps-details

  5. Jessica

    Ksplice is hiring kernel engineers and Pythonistas! HQ is in Boston, USA, remote workers welcome.
     
    Does writing Python clones of your favorite childhood computer games sound like a fun weekend project? Would you hack on an old-school graphics demo that fits into a DOS MBR in your free time? Have you ever told a joke whose punch line was a git command? If you answered yes to any of the above, we want to hear from you!
     
    We are excited to work on technology that most people will tell you is impossible: updating an operating system kernel while it is running. Help us develop the software and infrastructure to bring rebootless kernel updates to Linux, as well as new operating system kernels and other parts of the software stack.
     
    About us
     
    We are a small, tight-knit team of 12 women and men that enjoy working on hard technology problems. We were recently acquired by Oracle and are eager to take advantage of its vast resources to get Ksplice into the hands of sysadmins everywhere. Our product, Ksplice Uptrack, is a subscription service for Linux that provides completely non-disruptive, rebootless kernel updates. (You can read more about the underlying technology at http://www.ksplice.com/paper).  We’re based in Boston, Massachusetts. While relocating here is preferable, it’s not required, and we are already working as a distributed team with employees in several countries.
     
    Our open positions
     
    Kernel engineer: Help us bring Ksplice to new Linux distribution releases, build rebootless kernel updates, and improve and scale the infrastructure around distributing them to our users!
     
    This position requires experience with operating systems, including kernel programming, debugging, porting, memory management, and/or virtualization. Experience with compilers is also relevant.
     
    Pythonista: Help us bring the Ksplice Uptrack client to new Linux distribution releases, improve our server infrastructure, and develop and extend our REST API and Django-based web interface!
     
    This position requires experience with backend and/or frontend programming in Python/Django and fluency with Linux command-line and debugging utilities. Networking experience is also relevant.
     
    To find out more about software engineering positions in the Oracle Ksplice group, please email jobs@ksplice.com. Please include a copy of your resume. I have been with Ksplice since it was a tiny startup and through the acquisition — feel free to get in touch with me if you have any questions.

  6. A.Y. Siu

    We’re looking for a Technology Associate over at the Bay School of San Francisco. So far almost all of our applicants have been men. Not sure how many readers here are into doing help desk and sys / network admin’ing at a school, but here’s the posting (at the way bottom of the page):

    http://www.bayschoolsf.org/about/employment/

    [Moderator editing two posts together: this job is in the San Francisco Bay Area in the USA.]

  7. Justyna

    Hello Everone,

    I am currently working on a project researching underrepresentation of women in IT and related disciplines (for the purpose of Masters dissertation at Roehampton University, London). I am looking for 10-12 females who graduated up to five years ago (any subject) and currently work within IT industry in the UK or Europe) to complete an interview lasting about 25-30 minutes. My main areas of interest are challenges, experiences and perceptions as well as career choices of young graduates entering IT jobs (programmers if I am lucky but not necesarrily). The results will be read by two markers and will not be published further.

    Please get in touch if you could help :) my email address is justyna.bucktowar@yahoo.co.uk

    Thanks for reading.

    Justyna

  8. John Collison

    Stripe is hiring software engineers and designers. We’re a twenty-person company in San Francisco made up of people from all over the world. We’re happy to sponsor visa petitions.

    At Stripe, we’re making it easier for people to accept payments online. By building thoughtful infrastructure and interfaces, we’re helping to put new people and companies in business.

    More on our jobs page. If you’re interested, feel free to email me directly at john@stripe.com.

  9. Moose

    The Ohio LinuxFest is seeking speakers for our 10th anniversary conference, Sept 28-30, 2012, in Columbus, Ohio (USA).

    We are a volunteer-run, grassroots conference dedicated to educating and supporting Free & Open Source Software and related projects. We are especially looking for talks related to non-Linux topics, including (but not limited to!) BSD, Android, programming languages, and more.

    The Ohio LinuxFest has a strong (though evolving) Conduct Policy and believes that diversity is important to making Open Source open to everyone. We have reached as high as over 30% female speakers and aim to continue to reach high. However, we do not select talks based on perceived gender or other diversity values. We feel that the best way to get a more diverse speaker set is to have a more diverse pool to choose from.

    The Ohio LinuxFest encourages new speakers who have strong knowledge but no speaking experience to propose a talk and is willing to work with them to prepare their talk.

    The Call for Talks is here. Please feel free to ask me questions directly at moose@ohiolinux.org.

    Moose
    Chair
    Ohio LinuxFest

    http://ohiolinux.org/

  10. Jessica

    As part of my ongoing research, I’m trying to figure out how people think about racial and gender bias. I’ve developed a new test to help unpack this issue – but I don’t know yet whether the test works correctly.

    Right now, I’m trying to recruit sixty people to help me test my test. This involves reading some short vignettes and classifying some possible explanations for what happened in the story, and should take about thirty minutes.

    Need more information? Willing to help?

    http://svy.mk/Hl00ST

    Click the link! For science!

    (The project has been approved by the IRB [12-204].)

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