Dance The Linkspam Away (17 April 2015)

This was the week of tableflip.club!

  • tableflip dot club: “Women are leaving your tech company because you don’t deserve to keep us around.”
  • Why Women in Tech Need to Start Flipping Tables | Motherboard: “I think the huge response to the piece makes it clear how much these are the shared experiences women in tech have, so I’m glad I did go all-out. I’ll probably reveal myself eventually. It’s not like people don’t already know my opinions, but commentary on individual issues are a bit different from a call for women in tech to flip all the tables :)”
  • Screw leaning in. It’s time to slam the door in Silicon Valley’s face | The Guardian: “Even as an outside observer, I found the tableflip.club manifesto energizing. It has the feeling of a furious tweetstorm or impassioned speech – it goes beyond a mission statement and into the realm of oratory. It’s a huge departure from the usual women-in-tech rhetoric, which usually focuses on prying the doors of the tech world open through education, a positive attitude and changing the work environment. Nobody ever advocates just slamming the door back in Silicon Valley’s face.”

Other links:

  • Not the affirmative action you meant, not the history you’re making | Epiphany 2.0: “See, in America we often forget that the various initiatives which made up the capital-A Affirmative Action program were based on policies and procedures that have always existed for white men… SFFdom has not been immune to this societal tendency to give straight white guys more, treat them more kindly, eagerly open doors to them that are firmly shut against others.”
  • Codes of conduct and the trade-offs of copyleft — Crooked Timber: “But the first step might be — if you’re trying to get your community to adopt a code of conduct, you might benefit by looking at other freedom-restricting tradeoffs the community is okay with, so you can draw out that comparison.”
  • Does 18F Pass the Bechdel Test for Tech? | 18F: “We decided to see how many 18F projects pass this modified test. To pass, a project had to have at least one function written by a woman dev that called another function written by another woman dev.”
  • This Public Shaming Is Not Like The Other | Buzzfeed: “What makes this book an uncomfortable, if distant, cousin of GamerGate and men’s rights activist logic is that it, too, relies on a series of false equivalencies and muddy distinctions in order to elevate being shamed on social media to epic proportions. These sorts of distortions are dangerous because they minimize — and even threaten to erase — far more systematic and serious problems that have taken years to even reach the public consciousness.”
  • Black Girls Code Founder: To Bring Diversity to Tech, First We Need Role Models | Inc.com: “Bryant credits her own mentor, an electrical engineering upperclassman she met in college who was black and female, for keeping her — a student from inner city Memphis — in technology and in school. ”
  • Help Me Help You | Jenna Pederson: “I am asked, in what turns out to be a not so awesome way, if I’ll consider speaking at a conference or event. And if I won’t, do I know any other women who will. Sometimes this request comes after the speaker list has already been set and organizers have realized they don’t have enough diversity on the speaker lineup. Or it comes in a passive-aggressive, backhanded comment like ‘Well, if only Jenna would have submitted a talk…’ with a side-glance my way. Wait… so now it’s my fault?”
  • As Tech Giants Push For Diversity, Blacks And Latinos Are Fleeing Once-Diverse San Francisco | International Business Times: “It’s been a year since many tech companies in Silicon Valley released workforce transparency reports laying bare a sorry track record in minority hiring and announced plans to be more inclusive. But the Bay Area’s changing demographics are working against them. Local African-American and Hispanic residents are employed only in minuscule numbers by the tech industry, and increasingly finding themselves priced out and forced to leave.”
  • The Attention Game | Accidentally in Code: “This idea that you do things for “exposure” where the formula is exposure -> ??? -> profit. OK maybe you can argue that this model works for Kim Kardashian but not, I think for most of us. It didn’t work for Monica Lewinsky. Exposure is not inherently valuable. The value is in what results from it.”
  • Female Programmer Denied Job Because of Her ‘Unprofessional’ Attire | Daily Dot: “Elizabeth is a senior at Oberlin College in Ohio, and like many college seniors, she’s currently interviewing for jobs. But one interview made her so angry that she took to Facebook to vent her frustration.”
  • What They Really Mean When They Say They’re Not a Feminist | Everyday Feminism: “If you don’t call yourself a feminist, see if you find some of your reasons here. The stories in this comic can help us all have more respect for the wide range of ways we stand up to oppression.”
  • Project Opportunity: Contribute Stories on Digital Labor | HASTAC: “I’m currently launching a project that will act as this kind of publication, using familiar aesthetics and tropes of tech and business media to tell digital labor stories that usually don’t get coverage. The aim is to use familiar media elements to disrupt (to use a popular tech-industry word) dialogues on digital technology and the labor it runs on.”
  • BGN’s Women in Gaming Series: Nichol Bradford | Black Girl Nerds: “Nichol is currently CEO of The Willow Group, whose mission is to permanently move 100 million people into a state of fundamental well-being by 2025. She is also the Executive Director of the Transformative Technology Lab at Sofia University that is working outside traditional research boundaries to find creative ways to manage the intersection of technology and consciousness. We had a chance to talk about what it takes to be the architect of your own success, the power of “raising your hand” to create opportunities and the benefits of being obsessive about your passions in life.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

I’m a Member of the Linkspam Crew

  • Beyond Storytelling: Actionable Ways to Help with Tech’s “Woman Problem” | Autostraddle (April 11): “How many times do we have to tell these stories before they become real — before we all agree that this is a problem, and more than that, agree to do something about it? The conversation around sexism in the tech industry is completely halted in the “telling our stories” phase. I am sick of talking about “tech’s diversity problem.” I want to move the conversation forward, and I want to make things better.”
  • Sexism and Fonts | Typographica (April 8): “We spend a lot of time critiquing typefaces: their formal qualities, their historical references, their contemporary influences. We spend a bit less time discussing how those fonts are marketed and advertised. […] Consider a few choice lines from the microsites that describe… the type: “the flowing curves of a woman’s body” “all wrapped up in the leggy body of a Brazilian supermodel” “Like a supermodel, it can’t be squeezed into every situation.” “packed with alternates to play with… enough to turn you on and satisfy” “It looks good dressed down or in a little black dress.” Is talking about and presenting type in the visual language of seductive advertising sexist?”
  • Girls Make Games Proves Future Of The Gaming Industry Won’t Look Like A Boys Club | iDigitalTimes (April 9): About the formation of Girls Make Games, a summer camp for girls aged 9-13 to learn skills in game design, leading to creating successful games such as the newly-Greenlit The Hole Story.
  • Coding Scholarship for High School Girls – Kode with Karlie Kloss | Flatiron School: Flatiron School teams up with model Karlie Kloss to provide full scholarships for high school girls to learn software engineering.
  • Where Are the Women of Color in New Media Art? | Hyperallergic (April 7): “If radical and marginalized voices were meant to be a part of the conversation, why was the group specifically hand-picked? Why not allow women to have a seat at the table and join the conversation? It becomes challenging when [Women of Color] and [Queer & Trans Women of Color] are exchanging and sharing knowledge only among themselves — the situation becomes circular. The internet certainly allows for groups to engage in global conversations, but the fact remains that a “congress of cyberfeminist[s]” comprised of predominantly cis white women discussing issues of privacy, surveillance, new media, and digital art at a prestigious university doesn’t exactly help the communities that become the subjects of their discussions. It can be isolating to women in search of this type of (necessary) dialogue.”
  • Silicon Valley’s Other Diversity Problem: Age Bias in Tech by Grace Wong | Model View Culture (April 9): “But the open-mindedness that permits very young people to succeed in tech seems to go out the window when it comes to the other end of the age spectrum. Individuals who try to enter the tech industry via a non-traditional route are frequently told to “fake it until you make it,” but age is a tricky thing to try to fake. If asked outright, once you answer honestly, it feels like you’ve revealed something that can’t be taken back. And you have no control over how it will influence the way your abilities are judged.”
  • Making a makerspace – part 1 | Velochic Design: Shirley Hicks writes about the process of co-founding the Red Mountain Makers space in Alabama.
  • Fresh Romance Diverse Comics Magazine Announces New Creative Teams and Gail Simone Goal | The Mary Sue (April 8): New goals for the Kickstarter project for Fresh Romance, created to provide more opportunities for women in comics.
  • Who wants to be CEO? Not millennial women. | Fortune (April 3): “In a recent study by talent management firm Saba and WorkplaceTrends.com, just 36% of respondents who said they aspire to a C-level position at their company were women. Also disinterested in the top job: Millennials, who accounted for only 31% of those who said they wanted a spot in the C-Suite. That compares with 68% of older employees wanting top-level jobs. What’s going on here? When it comes to women, there’s one obvious factor at work: A lack of role models.”
  • 2014 VIDA Women in Literary Arts Count (April 4): Exploring the representation of women, including a specific survey of women of color, in literary writing.
  • A 12-Year-Old Girl Takes On The Video Game Industry | NPR Planet Money (April 8): “In a lot of video games, the default character is a guy. If you want to play as a female character, it’s not easy. Often you have to pay. […] Maddie decided to test her claim with a research project. She downloaded the 50 most popular games in the same category as Temple Run. She counted up how many offered female characters and how much they cost. And she handwrote her results on a spreadsheet. Out of the 50 games, 37 offered free male characters. Just five offered free female characters.”

 

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Cold as Linkspam (10 April 2015)

  • Notes on Reconnaissance and the need for harassment policies at SF Conventions | A.C. Buchanan (March 21): “As a generalised statement, the people most likely to be concerned about harassment are the people who are most likely to experience it. And these are often the people who have the least resources, the least energy, and are often just plain sick of fighting this everywhere they go. Phrases like “I want to learn” or “show me how to do this” are often used as derailing to further suck energy from people who have least ability.”
  • Anti-Abuse Team new policies & procedures — Public comment period April 3-17 | WisCon (April 3): “Since last fall, members of the WisCon Anti-Abuse Team have been working on developing new anti-harassment policies and procedures for our convention. We have been guided by the goal of making WisCon a safer and more enjoyable experience for everyone. To that end, we have worked to develop a policy that 1) makes reporting easy, 2) is compassionate and reporter centered, 3) facilitates a timely response and clear communication, and 4) reduces incidence of harassment through member education and by fostering a supportive, respectful climate.”
  • App For Hiring Decisions | Dilbert Comic Strip (April 6): Dilbert covers sexism in tech hiring and the workplace in this comic, as well as in Useless Mansplainers (April 7) and Mansplaining The Network (April 8).
  • How can we really get more women into tech? | Finding Ada (April 2): “Money is the one thing that never gets discussed in the public conversation about women in tech or STEM. Money gets glossed over, as if grassroots groups magically survive on the smell of a Jane Austen £10 note, or as if all we need are volunteers.”
  • Feminists in Tech: Please Stop Treating Sex Work as a Contagion by Eva Gantz | Model View Culture (April 6): “This view is every bit as reactionary as a conservative desire to regulate female sexuality. It places the blame squarely on porn performers, and removes any responsibility from men in tech. I received a clear message: sex work apparently undermines everything that women in tech are fighting for.”
  • G(o)rrrr  | Crooked Timber (April 6): At the General Online Research conference in March, women volunteerswere wearing “GORgeous” t-shirts, men volunteers were wearing “GORilla” T-shirts. The conference also had an all-man panel on “Behavioural Economics: A new idea of man — a need for new methods?”. The German Society for Online Research, which sponsored the conference, responded in the comments.
  • Teen girls coding their way to a brighter future | CNN (April 2): “Set up by local Amadu Mohammad, the non-profit organization supports 250 girls between the age of six and 18, priming them for formal education through extracurricular classes in reading, math, poetry and information technology. Its goal is to break through social barriers and provide Nima with a generation of female role models, and so the group provides school funding to help the girls shape their own future.”
  • Reddit eliminates salary talk from hiring | Mashable (April 6): “Ellen Pao, the interim CEO of Reddit, has seen women struggle with salary negotiations. So she’s eliminating money talk from the company’s hiring process. In her first interview since losing the landmark Silicon Valley trial, Pao told The Wall Street Journal that she has eliminated salary negotiations from the hiring process at Reddit, where she currently serves as interim CEO.”
  • The key to getting ahead for female tech entrepreneurs | The Age (April 2): “As a female entrepreneur Woodhouse said that having male mentors and advisors willing to ride shotgun with her in business meetings has been essential. She added that she had also struggled to find software developers who were willing to work with a woman.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

There’s No Linkspam Like Show Linkspam

A few more about the implications of the Ellen Pao trial:

More general links:

  • Things My Male Tech Colleagues Have Actually Said to Me, Annotated | The Toast: ““It’s not ‘P.C.’ to say this, but…” Thank you for this helpful preface alerting me to the fact that I can spend the next thirty seconds fantasizing about Star Trek without missing anything important.”
  • Tech conference bans scantily-clad “booth babes” | Fortune: “The fact that some large, respected companies still use women in body paint to try and draw attention to their wares seems outdated at best—kind of like handing out breath mint containers inscribed with a company logo. And while it’s not to blame for the overall dearth of women at many of these conferences, it certainly doesn’t promote an atmosphere that’s welcoming to both genders: Let’s face it, these companies are explicitly marketing specifically to men, and in the crudest way possible.”
  • A game that speaks of Africa | Polygon: About the upcoming game Aurion, developed by Cameroonian game company Kiro’o Games. “What we are trying to do in Aurion is to give another perspective. The power in our game is mainly a consequence of an inner path, not just your physical training. To fulfill your own goal you must count on the connection between you and your ancestors.”
  • Smart Watches: Am I F*cking Missing Something? | Autostraddle: “Perhaps it’s foolish to compare Google Glass and Apple Watch, but it’s hard not to—they’re the highest profile wearables so far. To me, Glass is an actual real technological development—it allows for entirely new and life-changing interaction as seen in the above video. It’s not some text messages on your wrist. I suppose what really gets me about the Apple Watch is this: there is no innovation here. Nothing about this makes the world a better place. It doesn’t even make the world a more connected place—the Apple Watch does nothing that existing technology can’t do. I’d go so far as to say it does nothing that Apple’s own existing technology can’t do.”
  • Sexual Violence in Epic Fantasy (TW) | Manic Pixie Dream Worlds: “Do these deeply harmful patterns occur in other dudebro epic fantasy novels? Do these cycles self-perpetuate in our narratives? Is it recursive with real world violence against women in geek culture — e.g., is threatening women with rape online when they get too uppity and have opinions and stuff a learned behavior that’s inspired in part by our problematic narratives around sexual violence?”
  • Michelle Rodriguez Talks Representation, Fridging, and Hollywood’s Problem With Female Characters | The Mary Sue: “I have such a strong sense of self, there are certain lines I just won’t cross. I’m really picky about the parts I choose. I can’t be the slut. I cannot be just the girlfriend. I can’t be the girl who gets empowered because she’s been raped. I can’t be the girl who gets empowered and then dies. So I just said to myself, look, you’re going to just have to create your own archetype, doesn’t matter if you go broke doing it. And I almost did go broke, twice! But people finally got it: OK, Michelle is not malleable, you’re not going to influence her by shining fame and money at her, and they stopped offering me that sort of stuff.”
  • Cards Against Humanity releases science deck to benefit women in STEM | Circa News: “Each pack of 30 cards costs $10 and proceeds benefit the Cards Against Humanity Science Ambassador Scholarship, aimed to cover four years of tuition for one high school or college student who identifies as a woman. The special deck features science themed-lines like “supermassive black hole” and “the quiet majesty of the sea turtle,” written by the Cards Against Humanity staff, author Zach Weinersmith and astronomer and writer Phil Plait.”
  • Fewer than three percent of land plant species named by women: Author gender over 260 years | International Association for Plant Taxonomy: “Female authors make up 12.20% of the total number of authors, and they published 2.82% of names. Half of the female authors published 1.5 or more names, while half the male authors published 3 or more names. Female contribution has accounted for more than 1% of new species names since 1900, and now stands at 11.97%. The difference in productivity between male and female authors has declined over time, and female authors are now 80% as productive as their male counterparts. In spite of botany’s traditional image as a feminine pursuit, women’s contribution was not significantly reflected in species authorship until the twentieth century, around the same time as in other branches of science.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The Linkspam of All Maladies (3 April 2015)

Starting out with a handful of links related to Ellen Pao:

  • The Limits of the Ellen Pao Silver Lining | Inc.: “It’s a sinking feeling reinforced by Claire Cain Miller’s New York Times interviews about the verdict with venture capitalists. When asked what they learned from the whole experience, they told Miller the case had taught them to:be less overtly sexist in work emails; formalize human resources standards; and be less hasty about declining to fund female entrepreneurs so quickly. Big progress, right? I mean, those are all good things, but shouldn’t they pretty much be table stakes at this point?”
  • Ellen Pao and the Sexism You Can’t Quite Prove — NYMag: “It is a form of soft discrimination that I fear might be all too familiar to all too many women — and often I find it hard to explain to my male friends and colleagues. Occasionally, I even find myself struggling to convince them that it is discrimination, and that it has consequences. It is pervasive. It is persistent. And it is so, so exhausting, all those subtle hints that you are a little different and that your behavior is being interpreted a little differently. On top of that, it does have profound consequences, if made through a million tiny cuts. The idea is to force covert sexism to be made overt where you can, around the conference table if not at the ski lodge or the cocktail party. Only then can you stamp it out.”
  • Ellen Pao, Kleiner Perkins and foiled champions — Medium: “We have gotten carried away with our own fabulousness to the degree that we don’t even see newcomers or people who choose to labor in the background. It’s a kind of power and influence that is exclusionary — making it less possible, month by month, for people outside power circles to enter the halls of influence, partake of its bounty and contribute to our industry and the world. This isn’t right, kind or productive.”

Other links:

  • Wonder Woman’s Invisible Jet Now on Display | AirSpace: Love this April Fool’s joke from the Smithsonian!
  • Call for proposals: !!Con 2015 | composition.al: “This year, for the second year in a row, my friends and I are organizing !!Con (pronounced bang bang con), a conference about the joy, excitement, and surprise of programming. !!Con is a conference with “a mission of radical inclusivity” where all the talks are ten minutes long1 and cover a bewilderingly wide range of topics.”
  • tim | “Call-out culture is very problematic,” said the naked emperor frantically | tim: “The general principles of skepticism, evidence-based decision-making, and even civility can be useful tools, but don’t obligate us to entertain those who use them in a way that sets off our bullshit detectors. And anti-call-out-culture crusaders are obviously insincere — if they were sincere, wouldn’t they spend some time doing something other than the activity they claim to detest (namely, calling people out)?”
  • Your Brief And Wondrous Guide To Contemporary Queer Comics | Huffington Post: “The following artists and creatives identify as queer, among other labels, like, for example, comic, illustrator, storyteller and writer. They defy rigid categorization in both life and work, weaving wonderfully unique and sex-positive tales about everything from college parties and intergalactic adventures to a criminal potato. If the following artists show us anything, it’s that there’s no one way to be queer. And why would you want to, when each individual perspective looks oh-so beautiful?”
  • Galactic Suburbia » Episode 116: 18 March 2015: “It’s our special 2014 Galactic Suburbia Award episode! Listen to find out our winner and shortlist for our award to honour activism and/or communication that advances the feminist conversation in the field of speculative fiction.”
  • How to defeat Internet bullies – CSMonitor.com: [CW: examples of online harassment and abuse] “Danielle Citron, a leading expert on privacy and online harassment, says it’ll take enforcing existing state laws as well as as broader societal acknowledgement that what happens online has real world effects, too. I recently spoke about these issues with Ms. Citron, the Lois K. Macht Research Professor of Law at the University of Maryland.
  • We Need More Badass Women: TV Bosses Tell Us Why The Bechdel Test Isn’t Enough | MTV News: “Some male writers might be absolutely fantastic at writing well-rounded, complex female characters (and vice-versa), but when it comes down to it, the consensus amongst the showrunners we interviewed seems to be that diversifying a writing staff leads to more complex characters. And since most TV writers look more like Rick Grimes than Carol Peletier — more like Michael Scott than Leslie Knope — it’s shows dominated by white men, with female characters existing as extensions of those men, that you’ll continue to see. (Minus, of course, the several standouts we’ve already mentioned.)”
  • Why This Disabled Woman No Longer Identifies as a Feminist | Disability and Representation | Changing the Cultural Conversation: “But what really, really drives me to bitter tears and raging inside my head is when people are all INTERSECTIONALITY FOREVER and WE’RE NOT SINGLE ISSUE FEMINISTS and WE’RE INCLUSIVE OF EVERYBODY and they chronically leave out disability from the analysis. And then when I mention the omission, I am met with silence (on a good day) and hostility (on a needlessly crappy one). The result is only more bitter tears and more raging inside my head.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

GF classifieds (April, May, and June 2015)

This is another round of Geek feminism classifieds. If you’re looking to hire women, find some people to participate in your study, find female speakers, or just want some like-minded folk to join your open source project, this is the thread for you!

Here’s how it works:

  1. Geeky subjects only. We take a wide view of geekdom, but if your thing isn’t related to an obviously geeky topic, you’ll probably want to give a bit of background on why the readers of Geek Feminism would be interested.
  2. Explain what your project/event/thing is, or link to a webpage that provides clear, informative information about it. Ideally you’ll also explain why geek women might find it particularly awesome.
  3. Explain what you’re looking for. Even if it’s not a job ad, think of it like one: what is the activity/role in question, and what would it involve? What is the profile of people you’re looking for?
  4. GF has international readership, so please be sure to indicate the location if you’re advertising a job position, conference, or other thing where the location matters. Remember that city acronyms aren’t always known world-wide and lots of cities share names, so be as clear as possible! (That is, don’t say “SF[O]” or “NYC” or “Melb”, say “San Francisco, USA”, “New York City, USA” or “Melbourne, Australia”.) And if you can provide travel/relocation assistance, we’d love to know about it.
  5. Keep it legal. Most jurisdictions do not allow you to (eg.) advertise jobs for only people of a given gender. So don’t do that. If you are advertising for something that falls into this category, think of this as an opportunity to boost the signal to women who might be interested.
  6. If you’re asking for participants in a study, please note Mary’s helpful guide to soliciting research participation on the ‘net, especially the “bare minimum” section.
  7. Provide a way for people to contact you, such as your email address or a link to apply in the case of job advertisements. (The email addresses entered in the comment form here are not public, so readers won’t see them.)
  8. Keep an eye on comments here, in case people ask for clarification or more details. (You can subscribe to comments via email or RSS.)

If you’d like some more background/tips on how to reach out to women for your project/event/whatever, take a look at Recruiting women on the Geek Feminism Wiki.)

Good luck!

Linkspam for people who hate links (31 March 2015)


We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Take the Linkspam and Run (29 March 2015)

  • On Being a Badass | New York Magazine – The Cut (March 1): “It strikes me that as women continue to break into traditionally masculine professions and defend their right to exist in unsafe spaces, the rest of us have a responsibility to do more than cheer them from the sidelines. We should also make clear that we understand this work is hard, that it often takes an emotional toll, that there are no easy answers, and that, when they acknowledge their feelings and admit their struggles, they’re all the more badass for it.”
  • Robot-Building 6-Year-Old Girls Talking Tech With Obama Is the Best Thing You’ll See All Week | Mother Jones (March 24): “The 6-year-olds from Tulsa’s Girl Scout Troup 411 were the youngest inventors selected to present at this year’s fair. Inspired by conversations with a librarian and one of the girls’ grandmas, they built a mechanical Lego contraption that can turn pages, to help patients with mobility issues read books.”
  • A Comics Creator Harassed Me On Twitter and I Don’t Want to Say His Name | Women Write About Comics (March 21): “I have a history with stalking, or rather, stalking has a history with me. He couldn’t have known that, our unnamed comic creator, when he decided to make my Twitter life as miserable as his own pathetic heart. He couldn’t have known much about me, or what hurts me, besides the obvious things that hurt all of us. But equally, he couldn’t have known that I DIDN’T have a stalker, a past that, like so many women, includes abuse. He did know, you know, that I am human. That every. Last. Person. You interact with on the internet, is human too.”
  • The divine witches of cyberspace | Boing Boing Offworld (March 24): “There is also a uniquely feminist layer to the digital fortunetelling space—it can offer a safe haven in the technology world, where smooth futures are far less certain for some as for others. Stone suggests that astrology and witchcraft have always, throughout history, offered ways for marginalized people to understand the world, even while white patriarchy, capitalism and their associated religious movements rutted up alongside and over them.”
  • Content warning: descriptions of sexual assault and harassment Sexism in Tech: Don’t Ask Me Unless You’re Ready To Call Somebody a Whistleblower | @katylevinson on Medium (March 8): “You’re tired of hearing about this “women in tech” stuff, and we’re tired of living it, but there are some big issues here, and we’re not going to solve them by pretending they don’t exist because we’re bored or afraid of them. We need serious discussions, and we have to have educated opinions about what’s wrong and how to fix it. We need to mull these ideas around until we come to some combination of hard data and cultural consensus before we can get meaningful change.”
  • The 5 Biases Pushing Women Out of STEM | Harvard Business Review (March 24): “We conducted in-depth interviews with 60 female scientists and surveyed 557 female scientists, both with help from the Association for Women in Science. These studies provide an important picture of how gender bias plays out in everyday workplace interactions. My previous research has shown that there are four major patterns of bias women face at work. This new study emphasizes that women of color experience these to different degrees, and in different ways. Black women also face a fifth type of bias.”
  • How Silicon Valley Can Change Its Culture to Attract More Women | The New Yorker (March 26): “She also sees value in talking about her own experiences as a woman engineer who presents in a “feminine” manner—not to suggest that all female engineers should wear floral dresses and speak softly, like she does, but to promote it as no less valid than turning up at work in a hoodie and jeans and using a loud voice.”
  • A Note on Call-Out Culture | Briarpatch Magazine (March 2): “There are ways of calling people out that are compassionate and creative, and that recognize the whole individual instead of viewing them simply as representations of the systems from which they benefit. Paying attention to these other contexts will mean refusing to unleash all of our very real trauma onto the psyches of those we imagine to only represent the systems that oppress us. Given the nature of online social networks, call-outs are not going away any time soon. But reminding ourselves of what a call-out is meant to accomplish will go a long way toward creating the kinds of substantial, material changes in people’s behaviour – and in community dynamics – that we envision and need.”
  • Salesforce CEO Says Company Is ‘Canceling All Programs’ In Indiana Over LGBT Discrimination Fears | CBS San Francisco (March 26): “Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff says he doesn’t want his employees subjected to discrimination as part of their work for the San Francisco-based company, and he is cancelling all required travel to the state of Indiana following the signing of a religious freedom law that some say allows business to exclude gay customers.”
  • A Fish Is the Last to Discover Water: Impressions From the Ellen Pao Trial | Re/code (March 26): “I can imagine that as the little injustices built up, she compartmentalized and moved on. That’s the easier path. It might not have occurred to her in real time that there should be a policy in place, for example. I know many women in high-powered positions who have not reported incidents or didn’t want to rock the boat. It can be the benefit of reflection on the totality of the situation that provides clarity.”
  • CASSIUS – Issue #1 | Kickstarter “Inspired by Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar and the events of history, Cassius is set in a Roman-esque universe centered around the collection of states know as Latium. The story follows our heroine Junia, who belongs to the Latium state of Cyrentha, and believes herself to be no more than ordinary. But one single act of violence suddenly thrusts Junia into a world of politics, betrayal, greed, bloodshed, and fate – and Junia must overcome it all if she is to survive.”
  • Philosophy has to be about more than white men | The Guardian (March 23): “Imagine a future where a student interested in, say, humanism, encounters a global range of thinking on the topic and not a narrow, regional one. Such a creative, fertile environment is not only possible but it is the only one that can return philosophy to its worthy purpose, namely the investigation of all human existence.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

A Big Ball of Wibbly-Wobbly Timey-Wimey Linkspam

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The vessel with the pestle has the Linkspam that is true (24 March 2015)

  • Every woman in every Disney/Pixar movie in the past decade has the same face: “Apparently every Disney woman is a clone/direct descendant of some primordial creature with huge round cheeks and a disturbingly small nose, because there is no other explanation (yes there is(it’s lazy sexism)) for the incredible lack of diversity among these female faces.”
  • Beyond: An anthology of queer SFF comics, coming in spring 2015. Currently fundraising.
  • Former Facebook Employee, Chia Hong, Sues for Sex Discrimination | Re/code: “A former Facebook employee is suing the company for a number of claims, including sex discrimination, harassment and race/national origin discrimination, according to a lawsuit filed with the San Mateo County Superior Court Monday.”
  • Robyn Launches Festival Promoting Women in Technology | News | Pitchfork: “In a press release, Robyn said she wanted to use the platform to inspire girls aged 11-to-18 who might be intrigued about technology—a historically male-dominated industry. ‘Tekla is a festival for girls, in which they get to sample different areas of future technology in what I believe will be a fun and imaginative environment,’ she wrote.”
  • New feminist Thor is selling way more comic books than the old Thor | Fusion: “While the audience breakdown is not available and there’s no way to know if the new Thor is bringing in more female readers, it is clear that she’s outselling the last series by A LOT. The first five new Thor books are currently selling more copies than the last five Thor books from 2012 by close to 20,000 copies per month, not including digital copies.”
  • Lighten Up — The Nib | Medium: Powerful comic about skin tone in comics coloring.
  • Chapter Three | Follow the Geeks: Profile of Lifehacker founder Gina Trapani. “Her skills as a programmer, leader, and writer are often overlooked, because she works so quietly. She flies under the radar, outshined by ideas shouted from the rooftops by Silicon Valley braggadocios. But Gina did something no other tech entrepreneur did, though most of them became big fans of it. She founded Lifehacker, the standard by which all productivity-enhancing web publications—now a dime a dozen—are judged. “
  • You can choose who submits talks to your conference | Julia Evans: “If you ask someone specifically to consider speaking at your conference, they’re WAY more likely to consider submitting a talk than if you don’t. If you then actively work with some talk submitters to help them focus and improve the talk they submit, their proposals will get better! And if you choose to focus your energies to work with (for instance) non-white people more than white people, then you’ll get more and better proposals from people who aren’t white.”
  • Doxxing to Defend Student Privacy | Hack Education: “If doxxing is the tactic – and “a primer” sure might indicate that it’s a-okay – then we have much more to do to prepare students about the implications of their online profiles, safety, surveillance, and discipline. Seriously, we have to think about what it means when political groups decide to use social media mechanisms not just to observe and monitor but to stifle dissent and quite literally to destroy their opposition.”
  • How This Young, Female and Latina Investor Broke Into a Middle-Aged, Male and White Industry | Hunter Walk: An interview with Ana Diaz-Hernandez of Kapor Capital. “I take my relationships very seriously: I believe deep, systemic issues require multi-disciplinary minds coming together. I work hard to bring together people who are taking radically different paths to address similar problems. It’s in those unconventional settings that amazing innovation happens. If you’re a driver of meaningful connections, people will want to work with you and you’ll be sure to have a place at the venture table.”
  • Art+Feminism Events on International Women’s Day « Wikimedia blog: “The Art+Feminism Campaign organized a global drive to host edit-a-thons on the weekend of International Women’s Day, to improve Wikipedia articles about women in the arts, feminism, and gender — as well as to raise awareness of the Wikipedia gender gap. Over 75 events took place around the world, bringing together about 1,500 participants — ranging from small gatherings of friends to large groups at significant cultural institutions like LACMA, the Walker Art Center, and the Stedelijk Museum. As a result, at least 400 new articles were created, and another 500 articles were significantly improved.”
  • Lawsuit: The 10 ways Twitter denies equal job opportunities for women | Mashable: “A software engineer suing Twitter for sex discrimination says the company’s mysterious promotions policy denies equal job opportunities for qualified women, according to court papers obtained Friday by Mashable — a document that handily alleges 10 personnel problems and five ways to fix them.”
  • Why I Don’t Want to Talk About ‘Women in Tech’ | Life as I Know It: “This week, I got an email from a local journalist asking if I wanted to participate in a focus group on writing about women in tech… here is the reply I sent.”
  • 24 Thoughts on Sexism, Feminism, YA, Reading, and The Publishing Industry | Stacked: A good summary for many situations. Women don’t get points for experimenting. They have to get it right the whole way through. Men are right when they try, even if they fail.

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.