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Geek Feminism Linkspams are compiled by the Linkspam team from public submissions. Thanks for your help!

Comfort me with links, for I am sick of spam (18 November 2014)

  • 55 works of iconic Indian writer released on Wikisource under a free licence | Wikimedia blog: “A total of 55 Kannada books by Niranjana are re-licensed. “This is the single largest and most comprehensive individual collection of a writer to be released under CC-BY-SA 4.0 in any of the Indian languages so far,” says Kannada Wikimedian Omshivaprakash.”
  • Over 9000: A game about visibility online when you’re a woman, made by Maddy Myers
  • Job Listings That Don’t Alienate (with images, tweets) · kissane | Storify: “I asked for people from communities that are underrepresented in their fields to talk about language in job descriptions that makes them back away, and the reverse—wording or specification that feel inviting. I got a lot of replies. If you make listings/do hiring, you should probably read them.
  • Barbie book about programming tells girls they need boys to code for them | The Daily Dot: “The latest affront to basic decency in gendered toy marketing comes from a Barbie book that tells girls they can’t be game developers or programmers…  Despite its encouraging title, Marenco’s book actually tells preteen girls that Barbie can only contribute to the design of the game she’s building.”
  • What a Huge Difference Those Little Actions Make | Medium: “I’m looking for more examples of positive stories from women in tech. I want to publish a collection of them — a LOT of them — in the hopes that reading them will make more people take that extra step to be welcoming and encouraging. To take that little step that costs nothing but might mean everything to a new, tired, or discouraged coworker.”
  • Night Witches by Bully Pulpit Games | Kickstarter: “Night Witches is a tabletop RPG about Soviet airwomen during World War Two, flying daring night time bombing missions in biplanes.”
  • How It Feels to Land a Spacecraft on a Comet | New York Times: Physicist, woman, person of color Claudia Alexander on landing a spacecraft on a comet: “Once we started getting the data, we are getting what we expected to get, and we know that the field is going to benefit from having made the effort to get this accomplished. It’s a wonderful feeling.”
  • Not All Nerds | The New Inquiry: “Silicon Valley monopolizes our national ideas about the future, aided by a presumption that the industry is exceptionally progressive when it comes to race. It’s this monopoly that turns the idea of putting iPads in the hands of every child into an urgent need. If we are to challenge Silicon Valley as the shining embodiment and most aggressive promulgator of a neoliberal future, then we need to attack its futurity. We can start by emphasizing how woefully retrograde it is—how 19th century its economics are, certainly, but especially its racial politics.”
  • Weather forecasters predict better services for women | Thomson Reuters Foundation: “Michel Jarraud, secretary-general of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), said progress had been made in improving weather forecasts and climate services to protect lives and livelihoods. ‘But if we are to help communities cope with long-term climate change and the anticipated increase in hazards like floods and heat waves, then we need to do more to reach out to women with gender-sensitive services,’ he said.”
  • Pandora Releases Its Staff Diversity Statistics | Complex: “Are we supposed to believe that there are no black, Asian, or Latino people out there that have expertise in music? This is especially strange if you consider that most of the Pandora consumer base is minorities.”
  • Sartorial Misogyny, Feminist Concern Trolling, and the “Little Things”  | Shakesville: “When feminist concern trolls like Dawkins whine about the misuse of feminism, talking about feminism like it’s meant to be kept under glass, broken only in case of a ‘real’ and ‘serious’ emergency, they’re deliberately ignoring how culture works. The ‘little things’ don’t happen in a vacuum, but are part of a spectrum of expressed misogyny that forms a systemic oppression of women.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The Principle of Least Linkspam (14 November 2014)

 

  •  Questions To Ask An Interviewer To Detect How Female-Friendly A Company or Engineering Team Is | Hackbright Acadamy:  “ “We do a lot of things outside of work together. I actually went surfing with one of my coworkers this morning. But if you wanted to find someone to, I don’t know, go shopping with you, I’m sure you could.” Such gender-based assumptions would cause me to worry about future assumptions that might be made. Not all answers will give such a clear signal, but any answer should still give you a good feel for the personalities of the people you would be working with.”
  • [Content note: descriptions of rape apologism and anti-semitism/nazi and fascist references] How we tried to prevent incidents at a hacker camp, why we expected not to succeed, and how we failed | Milena Popova: “Safer spaces policies are there not to prevent the reproduction of all patriarchal biases, but to prevent their manifestation in violence- verbal, mental or physical. They’re there to lower the cost of participation for people from oppressed groups from “I’m going to get slurs shouted at me all day” to “I’m going to feel slightly out of place”. Of course, they also have a second purpose – they are a form of fliter, a message saying “we’re not actively violent towards oppressed groups and if you are then you’re not welcome”.”
  • The Ladies Vanish | The New Inquiry: “Amazon has built a massive network of casualized internet laborers whose hidden work helps programmers and technological innovators appear brilliant. Their Mechanical Turk program, taking its name from the 18th century curiosity, hires people to do invisible work online—work which makes their client companies’ software look flawless. Amazon’s CEO Jeff Bezos calls it “artificial artificial intelligence.” Ninety percent of human intelligence tasks pay under $0.10 per task.”
  • [Trigger Warning: descriptions of harassment, stalking, sexual assault, and death threats] What US Law Can (and Can’t) Do About Online Harassment | The Atlantic: “Self-taken photos are owned by the photographer, so a website displaying those photos without consent is violating copyright.” “[Federal cyber-stalking] laws specifically stipulate that an “interactive computer service” cannot be used to threaten. Approximately half of the states in the U.S. have also updated their laws to allow authorities to press charges against people engaging in cyber stalking and cyber harassment.”
  • Dear @airsage | Sarah Fine: Airsage have published a sexist graphic depicting women’s participation in the transportation industry.
  • #endGamerGate2014 Linkspam | Bluebec: Another linkspam covering #GamerGate’s bad behaviour.

A few links about Matt Taylor wearing a ‘naked-lady shirt’ while representing the European Space Agency (note: he has since issued a personal apology):


We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Scenes from a linkspam (11 November 2014)

  •  QUEERS DESTROY SCIENCE FICTION! | LIGHTSPEED (31 October): “Submissions for our Queers Destroy Science Fiction! special issue. Anyone who identifies as queer can submit science fiction short stories, up to 7500 words. No fantasy for this special issue, though if our Kickstarter campaign goes well we might unlock Queers Destroy Fantasy! and Queers Destroy Horror! special issues as well. We very much want to see diverse queer representation and queer themes, but we are focused on the identity of the authors and the quality of the story. Submissions open October 31, 2014 and will close at 11:59 p.m. ET on February 15, 2015″
  • Wearables Are Totally Failing the People Who Need Them Most | Wired (6 November): “As the Internet of Things becomes an actual thing, more steps are being counted, more sleep patterns are being logged, more activities are being app-ified. What isn’t appearing in the data is much common sense or ambition. Instead, developers continue flocking to a saturated market filled with hipster pet rocks, devices that gather reams of largely superficial information for young people whose health isn’t in question, or at risk.
    It’s a shame because the people who could most benefit from this technology—the old, the chronically ill, the poor—are being ignored. Indeed, companies seem more interested in helping the affluent and tech-savvy sculpt their abs and run 5Ks than navigating the labyrinthine world of the FDA, HIPAA, and the other alphabet soup bureaucracies. This may be their own undoing, as there is a very real—and potentially lucrative—potential to shake up the healthcare system and frack the $2 trillion annual cost of chronic disease.”
  • [warning for discussion and video of harassment and sexual assault] #TakeDownJulienBlanc | Storify (7 November): A timeline of the #TakeDownJulienBlanc campaign.
  • Quirell | Indie Gogo (31 October): “Quirell is a social network currently in the planning stages being developed by queer/trans collective CollectQT. Quirell differs from traditional social networks in that it aims to be a place for marginalized community members and others to escape the noise and over-saturation of traditional social networks. This project is needed because as users of social media, we are affected by the lack of privacy measures in place on current social networks, ‘real name’ policies, and the way that new features are implemented and security is handled within most social networking sites.”
  • [warning for discussion of harassment] #DudesGreetingDudes Is One Guy’s Takedown Of Catcalling | Buzzfeed (6 November): “Ever since a video of a woman getting catcalled all over New York City went viral, people on the internet have been debating between whether catcalling is really a destructive expression of misogyny or a flattering dialogue between strangers. The dialogue inspired This Week in Blackness CEO Elon James White to question why, if this behavior is so harmless, or “complimentary,” don’t men do it with other men. Thus, the #DudesGreetingDudes hashtag was born, meant to shine a light on the hypocrisy of men saying that they’re just “saying hi” when they talk to women on the street.”
  • Exploiting Impostor Syndrome | this ain’t livin’ (4 November): “Just as women tend to be gaslighted, men are also very aware of impostor syndrome and how it works – even though they may not know that it has a name – and they exploit that knowledge to suppress the women around them. This is an example of how sexism snarls around people of all genders, with men taking advantage of a known phenomenon that affects women, and women thus becoming deeper ensnared in it because there’s reinforcement all around them.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Protector of the Linkspam ( 9 November 2014)


We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Linkspam on My Mind (7 November 2014)

  • The Dads of Tech | The Baffler: “Dad’s simplified Internet is a meritocracy, a place where the best rise to the top and competition makes regulation unnecessary. It is a realm where heroic innovators build on the work of their predecessors, steadily advancing and bettering humankind through the incessant upgrading of algorithms and apps, insistent that they are making the world more democratic and egalitarian even as they hoard wealth and influence for themselves.”
  • Codes of conduct and why my opinion about this doesn’t really matter: “Once a few events had accepted Codes of Conduct I started asking people new in the community, particularly women, how they felt about them. What they said, fairly unanimously, was that the Code of Conduct made them feel a lot better, and safer, about attending their first conference and joining the community. Of course I adopted a CoC after this, not just because they change how I felt about CoC’s, but because my opinion didn’t ever really matter. I’m a white guy, I don’t get to decide what makes non-white non-male people feel safe and accepted. This is even more important to remember during enforcement of the CoC where the goal must be to make those effected by harassment feel safe again.”
  • Handling of Sexual Harassment Case Poses Larger Questions at Yale | New York Times: [CW: Harassment, abuse of power] “A sexual harassment case that has been unfolding without public notice for nearly five years within the Yale School of Medicine has roiled the institution and led to new allegations that the university is insensitive to instances of harassment against women.”
  • Female academics: don’t power dress, forget heels – and no flowing hair allowed | The Guardian: “Essentially, the message is the same: unless women dress modestly and conservatively, they look out of place in academia, because fundamentally, they don’t have the right bodies to be academic authorities. This infuriates me, and I refuse to accept it. My intellectual abilities as an academic should be judged on my work: my research, my publications, and my lectures. This is how I have earned and now own my place in academia, regardless – or in spite of – my “feminine” appearance.”
  • They Call Me Doctor Berry | New York Times: “I was typically one of only two or three female students, and one of only one or two African-American students. I wanted to change the face of engineering by showing that the profession could be cool, interesting, exciting, engaging and, most important, diverse. In that way, insisting that students use my title isn’t just about me — it’s about broadcasting, to any female and black students who might hear it, that I am black, a woman, and an engineer, and that they can be the same.”
  • We’re Sexist Toward Robots | Motherboard: “But what’s weirder than our insistence on assigning gender to non-sentient machines is that we then sometimes treat them differently as a result. We’re sexist to robots. It would be funny in its absurdity, if it didn’t so harshly reflect the prejudices already ingrained in human society, and risk entrenching them even further.”
  • Why is Firefox tweeting Gamergate nonsense? | The Daily Dot: “Whatever strategy of back-and-forth inclusiveness Mozilla may be incorporating in order to warrant this kind of dual-sided approach, the women and other progressive gamers who have had to suffer the effects of Gamergate for the last two months (and counting) have lost all patience for it. Firefox may think it’s just being objective, but the reality is that the encouragement is amplifying the voices of Gamergate members who are already planning to branch out to Tumblr just as the rest of us are trying to declare the whole thing dead.”
  • The Other Side of Diversity — Medium: “I avoided the one place in the Bay Area I could go and feel not so different. It never dawned on me that the people who were telling me not to go there were the people who might go there and feel uncomfortable. It never dawned on me that I’d let other peoples experiences and cultural upbringing completely negate my own. It never dawned on me that I really wasn’t in the set of Us.”
  • For A Culture At War, PAX Australia Was The Perfect Antidote | Kotaku Australia: “Most of all it was reassuring to find that, face-to-face with the people who make up gaming culture, the negative element was absolutely a small group making a nasty unruly noise. It confirmed to me what I had suspected all along: the people who want to tear it all down, the people who want to harass and prod and bully: they are in the minority. And we can all applaud ironically as they finally leave the building.”
  • Gamergate and Academia | ICA Newsletter: “You might feel that these events do not relate to your research area, your position, or your students. You are wrong. The harassment members of our community have experienced is a problem that can have chilling effects on academia – both in and out of the communication field. Already, graduate students (and even some colleagues) have conveyed to us that they are frightened to speak up or study video games. When fear enters academia it is the research that suffers as all of our research becomes suspect and ‘under investigation.’”
  • Let Me Fix That For You, New York Times | Red Ink : “Yesterday, the New York Times dropped an opinion piece by Cornell researchers Wendy Williams and Stephen Ceci, making the bold claim that Academic Science Isn’t Sexist (<– that IS the title of the post, Gentle Readers)…. In order for any persuasive piece to be effective, internal consistency and logic is the rock-solid foundation upon which to pile on your massive heap of shite.  We’ll let the good people of science decipher the treatment of data, and tackle the post for the masses instead.  In the interest of bettering persuasive science writing, New York Times, let me fix that for you…”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The Linkspam and I (3 November 2014)

  • A Teenager Gets Grilled By Her Dad About Why She’s Not That Into Coding | Matter — Medium (29 October).
  • On alcohol and tech culture | beerops (28 October): “I don’t have any problems with alcohol in and of itself, but I do have problems with how I’ve seen it used as a gauge for someone’s value in the tech industry.”
  • Tech companies haven’t gotten past sexism 1.0 | SFGate (27 October): “I wondered whether the point of the gift had more to do with my gender than his company. It seemed as though Blake Francis, the founder, was addressing me as a woman, but not a journalist.”
  • I Hope Twitter Goes Away | Alex Gaynor (30 October): “Every user floats by themselves, interacting with who they please. This denies us the ability to build communities, to set social norms, and to enforce them.”
  • We do what we must because we can | ravishly  (27 October): [CW: harassment, transmisogyny, TERFs]  “I made a casual reference to the most famous, most prolific TERF—my intent was not to indict, but to illustrate that we are individuals in larger, arguably adversarial movements. Well that casual reference proceeded to feature me on her blog, replete with my birth name, home address and links to videos I’d forgotten I’d even made.”
  • Dealing with harassment (and spam) on the Web | BCC (26 October): “It’s not an easy algorithmic problem, it takes a psychological toll on human moderators, it puts online services into the uncomfortable position of arbiter of appropriateness of speech.”
  • The EntitleMen: techno-libertarian right wing sockpuppets of silicon valley | graydon2 (29 October) : “My thesis is that it is not [Neoreaction] per se that’s a “memetic adaptation of conservative thought”, but libertarianism; [Neoreaction] is a natural (hopefully brief) proto-fascist outburst from a long-lived libertarian movement in American politics, one that’s been growing in the tech community for a long time, and is fundamentally running on old-school conservative (rightist) ideological and emotional fuel.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The Silence of the Linkspam

  • My Day Interviewing for the Service Economy Startup from Hell | The Billfold (October 21st):  “I gave a smile and nodded back, as if I was familiar with the difficulties of finding a good cleaner when I was a student. I’d actually worked retail part-time throughout school so I could afford to pay $200/month rent splitting an un-air conditioned house in Atlanta with three other people. Hiring a maid would have been laughable.”
  • Where Are You Really From: Microaggressions and Making Tech Meetups Safe | Model View Culture (October 29): “I have recently decided that I am no longer going to any tech meetups. Yes I want to learn, and yes, I want to meet new people. But there are many times I don’t feel safe being in those spaces. There are times when I don’t want to be the only woman of colour in the room that happens to also wear the hijab proudly. When I would rather not spend my evening being asked ignorant questions or being gawked at.”
  • Surveillance Begins at Home | Forbes (October 28): “As Domestic Violence Awareness Month comes to a close, we ought to have a conversation about how technology aids and abets intimate partner violence. Privacy advocates rarely connect the dots between intimate partner violence and surveillance, and anti-violence advocates often fail to talk about technology in its entirety—and they omit in particular the complicity of law enforcement in the abuse of technology.”
  • What goes around comes around, and bites you from behind | Sorry Watch (October 24): “He doesn’t seem to have said “sorry” or “apologize.” He has certainly said he was wrong. He hasn’t made excuses, claimed to have been misunderstood, or cried sandbag. But his understanding is still flawed. He doesn’t seem to understand how gender discrimination plays out in the workplace. (“Just ask!”) Nor has he addressed the notion of female “superpowers” that involve not asking for money and infant-retrieval.”
  • A Code of Conduct is Not Enough | Model View Culture (October 27): “In spite of all these efforts, there were two reported violations of our code of conduct (CoC) at our tiny two-day conference with 120 attendees. Despite “doing everything right,” we failed to create a safe space for our attendees. How did we screw up?”
  • Meet Arooo, a open source membership management app by DU | Double Union (October 27): “Double Union is tickled to announce the open sourcing of Arooo, our membership management application! We’ve been building it for almost a year now, and have grown our membership from about 20 people to ~150 using it.”
  • New York Comic-Con Diversity Panels – We’re Here, We’ve Been Here, We’ll Be Here | Black Girl Nerds (October 29): “I am so pleased that New York Comic-Con had so many different panels on diversity for so many marginalized groups, people of color being just one such voice. The more a large convention allows our voices to be heard from the smallest of the panel rooms to the Main Stage, the more we will be thought of and heard in both the independent and main stream industries that we are fighting to be represented in.”
  • Unlocking the Invisible Elevator: Accessibility at Tech Conferences | Model View Culture (October 27): “I appreciate all the great opportunities I have had over the years, and I absolutely love that people love my talks! Those things don’t change the fact that my work is co-opted to make organizations feel good about themselves and look good to others. If I’m the only person at your conference who has a visible disability, if I’m the only wheelchair user, guess what, I’m pissed. And you’re most certainly doing something wrong.”
  • How Ada Lovelace Became Famous Again | io9 (October 28): “The problem wasn’t just that she was a woman at a time when women in science were few and far between. She had also devoted herself to a branch of science that wouldn’t blossom until a century after her death. But she was enough of a celebrity that she was never quite forgotten.”
  • Ten Lessons Learned from Organizing Diversity-Focused Events | Model View Culture (October 29): “In order to create an event with diverse speakers and attendees, you need to push outside your comfort zone, ask a lot of questions, and fail a lot of times. Instead of just focusing on ticket sales, we should build events that make people from diverse backgrounds feel safe and confident to attend.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The Fellowship of the Linkspam (26 October 2014)

  • Meet the Awesome League of Female Magic: The Gathering Players | bitchmedia (20 October): “Magic: The Gathering is a collectible trading card game published by Wizards of the Coast, the same company responsible for Dungeons and Dragons. Over the last twenty or so years, Magic has gained significant popularity and become a staple of nerd culture. Magic: The Gathering is played in a competitive tournament setting, casually at kitchen tables, while waiting in line at cons, and everything in between. Magic tournaments are not often a welcoming space for women despite the efforts of many within the community so, naturally, Magic horror stories were a popular topic of discussion at Geek Girl Con.”
  • Disney Princesses Are My (Imperfect) Feminist Role Models | boingboing (24 October): “So why not write off these problematic princesses and find better role models? Part of the power of the Disney princess is that she is inescapable. As a massive conglomerate, Disney is able to give its princess line an almost frightening level of cultural ubiquity. Conventional wisdom holds that girls will watch male-driven stories while boys will simply ignore female-driven ones. But it was impossible to ignore Frozen last year just as it was impossible to ignore Snow White, The Little Mermaid, and Beauty And The Beast when they premiered. Stop a few hundred people on the street and they’ll likely be able to name more Disney princesses than American Girl dolls, Baby-Sitters Club members, or Legend Of Korra characters. It’s important to introduce young girls to well-written female characters in niche properties, but it’s equally important to teach young girls that their stories don’t have to be niche.”
  • [infographic] The Gender Divide in Tech-Intensive Industries | Catalyst (23 October): While the leaky pipe metaphor has its flaws, it is one of the many reasons the tech industry is hostile to women.
  •  Anita Sarkeesian speaking at XOXO Conference | Feminist Frequency (7 October): “In September 2014, I was invited to speak at the XOXO conference & festival in Portland. I used the opportunity to talk about two subtle forms of harassment that are commonly used to try and defame, discredit and ultimately silence women online: conspiracy theories and impersonation. (Note: trigger warning early on for examples of rape and death threats as well as blurred images of weaponized pornography).”
  • [warning for discussion and examples of sexual harassment] A Natural A/B Test of Harassment | Kongregate (23 October): “all the questions made me think more deeply about my experience, particularly the low-level harassment I get that I’d taken as a given, normal for a co-founder of a game site. It occurred to me to check with my brother/co-founder Jim, but he said he almost never gets hassled. Most of the harassment I receive is through Kongregate’s messaging system, and looking at my last 25 public messages mixed in with compliments and requests for help there are several harassing/sexual messages. Jim has none.”

#Gamergate

  • It’s Not Censorship to Ignore You | NYMag (21 October): “women were merely pointing to a threatening, gender-specific kind of speech, and asking for the tools to avoid it. There’s something obviously illogical about free-speech panic among white Americans in 2014. Thanks to online publishing and social media, the barrier to entry for free public speech is lower than ever.  What I suspect truly bothers free-speech reactionaries is that the same, democratized new media that allows them to publish free-speech rants has opened public discourse up to a lot of people they’re not used to hearing from — women, people of color, and those Gamergate calls “social justice warriors,” in particular. Some of the people who historically controlled the media uncontested might not like what these people have to say, but these newcomers are nonetheless very popular. And when a “social justice warrior” chooses to wield the “block” button against a troll, it’s not his freedom of speech that’s in danger, it’s his entitlement to be heard.”
  •  S4E7 – #GamerGate (Base Assumptions) | blip.tv (22 October): Critical discussion of Gamergate in terms of base assumptions. “The use of terror tactics, even if only by a minority, has created an environment of fear that all members [who believe gamergate is solely about ethics in games journalism] enjoy the privilege of. When people are unwilling to engage because of fears that they’ll be next, all members [of gamergate] benefit from that person’s silence, even if they were not responsible for that harassment.”
  • [warning for harassment and threats of violence] GamerGate’s Economy Of Harassment And Violence | ravishly (20 October):”You cannot separate violence, any violence, from the context and circumstances of the society in which that violence transpires. Whoever benefits from violence is culpable for that violence. For this reason, every woman who endures harm in the wake of GamerGate’s expansion – whether it’s being forced into hiding or self-harming in the wake of unrelenting pressure and harassment – is a victim of GamerGate.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Call Me Linkspam

  • It’s Ada Lovelace Day: Get Angry | Garann Means (October 14): “It’s Ada Lovelace Day and we’re supposed to talk about the women in technology who’ve inspired us. The women who inspire me are those who’ve taken the frightening step of lessening their culpability by decreasing their participation. While it’s courageous to remain in tech/on the internet and try to make it a better place, you can’t get around the compromise in doing so.”
  • When Women Stopped Coding | NPR Planet Money (October 21): “These early personal computers weren’t much more than toys. You could play pong or simple shooting games, maybe do some word processing. And these toys were marketed almost entirely to men and boys. This idea that computers are for boys became a narrative. It became the story we told ourselves about the next computing revolution.”
  • Online Harassment | PEWResearch Internet Project (October 22): “In broad trends, the data show that men are more likely to experience name-calling and embarrassment, while young women are particularly vulnerable to sexual harassment and stalking.”
  • Breaking gender and racial barriers in Netrunner | Gamasutra (October 20): “Netrunner is a lovely and beloved experience for all those reasons, but the game is worth championing for other ideas that go beyond its smart design too. It’s also worth celebrating because Netrunner is one of the most progressive games in terms of gender and minority representation today.”
  • Life and Times of a Tech Feminist Killjoy: The Cuts Leave Scars | Julie Pagano (October 6): “After years of pushing yourself and being stretched too thin, you lose the flexibility you once had to bounce back. You snap more easily. The paper cuts are harder to brush off. You are likely to be punished for this. You will be seen simultaneously as too sensitive and too harsh.”
  • Marvel’s Victoria Alonso wants a female superhero movie, calls for more women in VFX | Variety (October 20th): “You’ve got to get the girls in here, boys. It’s better when it’s 50-50,” she continued. “I have been with you beautiful, handsome, talented, creative men in dark rooms for two decades and I can tell you those rooms are better when there are a few of us in them. So as you take this with you, please remember that it’s OK to allow the ladies in. They’re smart, they’re talented. They bring a balance that you need.”

#Gamergate

  • The only thing I have to say about gamer gate | Felicia Day (October 22): “I know it feels good to belong to a group, to feel righteous in belonging to a cause, but causing fear and pushing people away from gaming is not the way to go about doing it. Think through the repercussions of your actions and the people you are aligning yourself with. And think honestly about whether your actions are genuinely going to change gaming life for the better.”
  • Felicia Day’s worst Gamergate fears just came true | The Daily Dot (October 23): “Day wrote of realizing after crossing the street to avoid two gamers she saw in Vancouver that she had allowed Gamergate to enhance her fear of other people within her community. Her post was an attempt to conquer that fear and to urge other women to do the same.But less than an hour after describing her past experiences with stalkers in the post, a commenter showed up to do the one thing she feared would happen.”
  • Why #Gamergate is actually an ed tech issue | Medium (October 20): “It’s not simply the hyper-macho shoot ‘em up games, either. I’ve had girls leave Minecraft because of misogynist threats. Apparently, this isn’t an isolate case. Others have seen the same thing. If we want to talk about integrating games into the classroom, we need to rethink what culture we’re inviting in.”
  • Gamergate goons can scream all they want, but they can’t stop progress | Wired (October 21): “Even more fascinating is how these insecurities have allowed some gamers to consider themselves a downtrodden minority, despite their continued dominance of every meaningful sector of the games industry, from development to publishing to criticism. That demonstrates a strange and seemingly contradictory “overdog” phenomenon: The most powerful members of a culture often perceive an increase in social equality as a form of persecution.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Fish Are Friends, Not Linkspam (21 October 2014)

#Gamergate

  • On Gamergate: a letter from the editor | Polygon (October 17): “Video games are capital “C” Culture now. There won’t be less attention, only more. There won’t be less scrutiny. There certainly won’t be less diversity, in the fiction of games themselves or in the demographics of their players. What we’re in control of is how we respond to that expansion, as journalists, as developers, as consumers. Step one has to be a complete rejection of the tools of harassment and fear — we can’t even begin to talk about the interesting stuff while people are literally scared for their lives. There can be no dialogue with a leaderless organization that both condemns and condones this behavior, depending on who’s using the hashtag.”
  • Gamergate threats: Why it’s so hard to prosecute the people targeting Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian | Slate (October 17): “The light penalties attached to many of these online crimes also deter officials from taking them seriously, because the punishment doesn’t justify the resources required to investigate and prosecute them”
  • Of Gamers, Gates, and Disco Demolition: The Roots of Reactionary Rage | The Daily Beast (October 16): “Our various “culture wars” tend to boil down to one specific culture war, the one about men wanting to feel like Real Men and lashing out at the women who won’t let them.”
  • Gamergate in Posterity | The Awl (October 15): “Maybe there will be some small measure of accountability in the far future, not just for public figures and writers and activists, but for all the people who could not or would not see their “trolling” for what it really was. Maybe, when their kids ask them what they were like when they were young, they will have no choice but to say: I was a piece of shit. I was part of a movement. I marched, in my sad way, against progress. Don’t take my word for it. You can Google it!”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.