Category Archives: Uncategorized

I won’t leave Berlin until investors quit being pigs. Deal?

We’ve seen over the years through conference anti-harassment work that when people who have experienced harassment speak up, others are often empowered to share their own experiences of harassment from the same perpetrator, or other perpetrators in the same community.

Yesterday, a courageous New York-based entrepreneur named Geshe Haas came forward about having been the target of what one Valleywag commenter called an “entitled demand” for sex from an investor named Pavel Curda. Today, Berlin-based Lucie Montel also published a screenshot of a very similar advance from Curda:

Tech industry magazine The Next Web summed up the reports and stated that they will no longer publish Curda’s writing.

While there has been previous discussion of women entrepreneurs being sexually harassed by investors, those who have experienced harassment talk of widespread fear about naming names, even anonymously. The price of speaking up can be very high even without the particular power that investors hold over entrepreneurs, who lack even the bare minimum protection that employment law provides. Much of what we know about the gender climate in the investment and venture capital fields comes from whispered one-on-one conversations between women, as well as some details from lawsuits around such harassment in the VC industry.

To my knowledge, Haas and Montel are the first to come forward about this kind of harassment outside the context of legal action. In a climate where prominent incubators must “remind” their investors not to harass participants, this is a huge step forward. I hope that their brave examples will make it easier for other women to speak up in the future.

Wednesday Geek Woman: Sofia Samatar, Author, Poet, and Editor

Sofia SamatarIn addition to being the poetry and nonfiction editor for the literary journal Interfictions, Sofia Samatar is the winner of this year’s John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer.

Her novel, A Stranger in Olondria, has gotten rave reviews. It won the Crawford Fantasy Award; it was a finalist for the Nebula Award and the Locus Award for Best First Novel; and it’s still a finalist for the British Fantasy Award and the World Fantasy Award. You can read an excerpt over on Tor.com.

Her short story “Selkie Stories Are For Losers” has been appearing on a lot of awards shortlists, too. It was a finalist for the Hugo, Nebula, and the British Science Fiction Awards, and is still a finalist for the World Fantasy Awards. You can find links to more of her short fiction (and her poetry!) on her website.

The Linkspammer’s Guide to the Galaxy (19 August 2014)

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The Hugo Awards!

It was a good year for women in Science Fiction and Fantasy at this year’s Hugo Awards, which were presented this evening in London, at the 2014 WorldCon.

Here are this year’s winners:

I’m thrilled that the Hugo Award for Best Novel went to Ann Leckie’s Ancillary Justice. Leckie has been sweeping the genre’s major awards this year for her compelling tale of vengeance and identity. Ancillary Justice does interesting things with gender, and deftly handles social issues from drug addiction to colonization–wrapping it all up in a richly-detailed galactic epic. I can’t recommend it enough.

She was nominated alongside Charles Stross for Neptune’s Brood, Mira Grant for ParasiteThe Wheel of Time, by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson, and Larry Correia’s Warbound, listed in order of votes received.

The award for Best Novella went to Charles Stross’s “Equoid.” It was nominated alongside Catherynne M. Valente’s Six-Gun Snow White, “Wakulla Springs,” by Andy Duncan and Ellen Klages, Brad Torgersen’s “The Chaplain’s Legacy,” and Dan Wells’s The Butcher of Khardov.

Mary Robinette Kowal’s “The Lady Astronaut of Mars won the Hugo for Best Novelette. It’s available for free at Tor.com if you haven’t had a chance to read it yet, and it’s another one that I can’t recommend highly enough (full disclosure: I’ve been a student in two of Kowal’s writing courses and I think she’s a delightful human being).

“The Lady Astronaut of Mars” was nominated alongside Ted Chiang’s “The Truth of Fact, the Truth of Feeling,” Aliette de Bodard’s “The Waiting Stars,” and Brad Torgersen’s “The Exchange Officers.” The voters decided not to award a fifth-place in the category, voting ‘No Award’ ahead of Theodore Beale’s “Opera Vita Aeterna.”

The award for Best Short Story went to The Water That Falls on You from Nowhere, by John Chu. Chu gave a touching acceptance speech, thanking the many people who have supported and encouraged him as he faced racism and heterosexism to pursue his writing career. His work was nominated alongside “Selkie Stories Are for Losers”, by Sofia Samatar, “If You Were a Dinosaur, My Love” by Rachel Swirsky, and “The Ink Readers of Doi Saket” by Thomas Olde Heuvelt.

We Have Always Fought: Challenging the Women, Cattle and Slaves Narrative, by Kameron Hurley won the Hugo for Best Related Work. This is an excellent and well-deserving essay on the history of women in combat, challenging the common narrative that women can’t be heroes of genre fiction because it’s ahistorical. Definitely worth a read if you haven’t seen it yet.

It was nominated alongside Jeff VanderMeer and Jeremy Zerfoss’s Wonderbook: The Illustrated Guide to Creating Imaginative FictionWriting Excuses Season 8, by Brandon Sanderson, Dan Wells, Mary Robinette Kowal, Howard Tayler, and Jordan Sanderson, Queers Dig Time Lords: A Celebration of Doctor Who by the LGBTQ Fans Who Love It, Edited by Sigrid Ellis and Michael Damian Thomas, and Speculative Fiction 2012: The Best Online Reviews, Essays and Commentary, by Justin Landon and Jared Shurin.

In the Best Graphic Story category, Randall Munroe won for xkcd: Time, a four-month-long comic that was updated at the rate of one frame an hour. He couldn’t make it to London to accept the award, so Cory Doctorow accepted on his behalf–wearing the cape and goggles in which he’s depicted as a character in xkcd.

Also nominated in the category: Saga, Vol 2, by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples, Girl Genius, Volume 13: Agatha Heterodyne & The Sleeping City, by Phil and Kaja Foglio and Cheyenne Wright, “The Girl Who Loved Doctor Who,” by Paul Cornell and Jimmy Broxton, and The Meathouse Man, by George R. R. Martin and Raya Golden.

The award for Best Dramatic Presentation, Long Form went to Gravity, written by Alfonso Cuarón & Jonás Cuarón and directed by Alfonso Cuarón.

Best Dramatic Presentation, Short Form went to Game of Thrones: “The Rains of Castamere”, written by David Benioff and D.B. Weiss and directed by David Nutter.

Ellen Datlow took home the Hugo for Best Editor, Short Form. She was nominated alongside John Joseph Adams, Neil Clarke, Jonathan Strahan, and Sheila Williams.

In the Best Editor, Long Form category, the award went to Ginjer Buchanan, nominated alongside Sheila Gilbert, Liz Gorinsky, Lee Jarris, and Toni Weisskopf.

Julie Dillon won this year’s award for Best Professional Artist, nominated alongside Daniel Dos Santos, John Picacio, John Harris, Fiona Staples, and Galen Dara.

Lightspeed Magazine was this year’s winner for Best Semiprozine, nominated alongside Strange Horizons, Apex Magazine, Interzone, and Beneath Ceaseless Skies.

In the Best Fanzine category, the winner was A Dribble of Ink, nominated alongside The Book Smugglers, PornokitschJourney Planet, and Elitist Book Reviews.

The award for Best Fancast went to SF Signal Podcast, nominated alongside The Coode Street PodcastGalactic Suburbia PodcastTea and Jeopardy, The Skiffy and Fanty Show, Verity!, and The Writer and the Critic.

This year’s award for Best Fan Writer went to Kameron Hurley, author of insightful and incisive feminist commentary on the history and future of SFF as a genre and a community. She was nominated alongside Abigail Nussbaum, Foz Meadows, Liz Bourke, and Mark Oshiro.

The Best Fan Artist award went to Sarah Webb. Also nominated in the category:  Brad W. Foster, Mandie Manzano, Spring Schoenhuth, and Steve Stiles.

Worldcon also presents the  John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, which is not a Hugo, but is administered with the Hugos. This year’s winner was Sofia Samatar.

Samatar was nominated alongside Wesley Chu, Ramez Naam, Benjanun Sriduangkaew, and Max Gladstone. I’m thrilled to see Samatar go home with a Hugo, but I’m also pleased that fandom chose to recognize the talents of so many writers of color this year. If you haven’t checked out their work yet, it comes highly recommended. I’m personally really enjoying Samatar’s A Stranger In Olondria.

For more information on this year’s Hugo voting, check out the LonCon 3 site‘s detailed vote breakdown [PDF link].


I wrote previously about the attempt to stuff the ballot box for political reasons this year. I’m glad that fandom saw fit to reject this politicization of its biggest award, but since I’ve already seen folks trolling about ‘social justice warriors,’ this is your reminder that we have a strictly-enforced comment policy.

A Linkspam in Time (17 August 2014)

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Surely You’re Joking, Mr Linkspam

  • Many Women Leave Engineering, Blame The Work Culture | All Tech Considered, NPR (August 12): “Conventional wisdom says that women in engineering face obstacles such as the glass ceiling, a lack of self-confidence and a lack of mentors. But psychologists who delved deeper into the issue with a new study found that the biggest pushbacks female engineers receive come from the environments they work in.”
  • Survey of Academic Field Experiences (SAFE): Trainees Report Harassment and Assault | PLOS ONE (July 16): “Codes of conduct and sexual harassment policies were not regularly encountered by respondents, while harassment and assault were commonly experienced by respondents during trainee career stages. Women trainees were the primary targets; their perpetrators were predominantly senior to them professionally within the research team.”
  • Harassment in Science, Replicated | New York Times (August 11): “More than half of the female respondents said they weren’t taken seriously because of their gender, one in three had experienced delayed career advancement, and nearly half said they had not received credit for their ideas. Almost half said they had encountered flirtatious or sexual remarks, and one in five had experienced uninvited physical contact.”
  • Guardians of the Galaxy, We Need To Talk | Tor.com (August 13): “Here’s the thing. You can’t give me Gamora then spend the whole movie slut-shaming her and locking her into an unnecessary romance, then expect me to grateful a woman was even allowed a prominent role.”
  • “Guardians of the Galaxy” passes the Bechdel test, still fails women | Salon (August 6): “In this context, it’s pretty easy to imagine what happened with Guardians of the Galaxy: Gunn genuinely went out to create a film with “strong female characters” and was savvy enough to include a basic Bechdel pass. But then secure in the knowledge that he was meeting that goal, he failed to realize that jokes about prostitution and background characters like the Collector’s assistant and Peter Quill’s one-night-stands would serve to undermine those intentions.”
  • A Female Superhero Pitches a Movie | Adventures of Angelfire, YouTube (August 8): A funny take on how movie executives react to the idea of a movie starring a female superhero.
  • Where Are the Superheroines of STEM on the Silver Screen? A Wishlist of Amazing Women | Autostraddle (August 9): “My point is, there are enough lady STEMers to be getting on with, moviemakers and film-shakers. And I have a few suggestions.”
  • I Desire to Be More Sensitive | Satifice (July 16): “After a rocky start to the morning, I can tell you the absolute last thing I had any desire to do during my one hour lunch break was to engage in the emotional and intellectual labour of teaching SWC how to do things better. “
  • We Have a Rape Gif Problem and Gawker Media Won’t Do Anything About It | Jezebel (August 11): “If this were happening at another website, if another workplace was essentially requiring its female employees to manage a malevolent human pornbot, we’d report the hell out of it here and cite it as another example of employers failing to take the safety of its female employees seriously. But it’s happening to us. It’s been happening to us for months. And it feels hypocritical to continue to remain silent about it.”
  • What Gawker Media is Doing About Our Rape Gif Problem | Jezebel (August 13): “But you, Troll, also did this company a favor: you have forced Gawker Media to give the problem — the state of our commenting system and specifically its failures — the attention it deserves. You’ve actually done some good around here, Troll!”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Quick hit: Maryam Mirzakhani wins the Fields Medal

Image of Maryam Mirzakhani

CC-BY-SA 3.0 image by Ehsan Tabari

The Fields Medal is the highest award in the field of mathematics. Some people have called it the math equivalent of the Nobel Prize, though it’s not a perfect analogy since Fields medalists must be younger than 40 years old. Fifty people received the Fields Medal between 1936 and 2010 (the award is given every four years to between two and four mathematicians). All of them were men.

Today, Stanford math professor Maryam Mirzakhani (born in 1977) became the first woman, and the first person of Iranian descent, to win the Fields Medal. (It was also awarded to Artur Avila, Manjul Bhargava, and Martin Hairer.) Her work lies in the intersection of geometry, topology, and dynamical systems.

You can read more about Dr. Mirzakhani in a profile of her by Erica Klarreich:

Mirzakhani likes to describe herself as slow. Unlike some mathematicians who solve problems with quicksilver brilliance, she gravitates toward deep problems that she can chew on for years. “Months or years later, you see very different aspects” of a problem, she said. There are problems she has been thinking about for more than a decade. “And still there’s not much I can do about them,” she said.

Mirzakhani doesn’t feel intimidated by mathematicians who knock down one problem after another. “I don’t get easily disappointed,” she said. “I’m quite confident, in some sense.”

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Linkspam (12th August, 2014)

  • this has been going on a long time | Filling the Well (August 6): “Women have always spoken out against sexism and the injustice done to them for no other reason than their identity as women.” Quotes from outspoken feminists throughout the ages.
  • Twitter Won’t Stop Harassment on Its Platform, So Its Users Are Stepping In (August 6): “The network tells abused individuals to shut up (‘abusive users often lose interest once they realize that you will not respond’), unfollow, block, and—in extreme cases—get off Twitter, pick up the phone, and call the police. Twitter opts to ban abusive users from its network only when they issue ‘direct, specific threats of violence against others.’ That’s a criminal standard stricter than the code you’d encounter at any workplace, school campus, or neighborhood bar.”
  • Why are the media so obsessed with female scientists’ appearance? | theguardian.com (August 10): “Yet another profile of Susan Greenfield feels the need to dwell on her ‘long, youthfully blond hair’. Why are the media so rubbish at covering women in science?”
  • In Science, It Matters That Women Come Last | FiveThirtyEight (August 5): “The news is both good and bad. When a female scientist writes a paper, she is more likely to be first author than the average author on that paper. But she is less likely to be last author, writes far fewer papers and is especially unlikely to publish papers on her own. Because she writes fewer papers, she ends up more isolated in the network of scientists, with additional consequences for her career.”
  • Five Aussie women with apps to their name | the age (August 9): “Apple alone has clocked more than 1.2 million apps and 75 billion user downloads from its App Store worldwide, while Google Play lists 1.3 million apps. Most of those, people assume, were built by men. But for women, who’ve long been a minority group in the tech sector, the apps market is proving fertile, according to Miriam Hochwald, founder of Girl Geek Coffees, a networking group.”
  • Backing diversity lowers the bar? | SC Magazine (August 4): “when we as an industry only make room for “tough” people, people who are willing to put up with sexist, racist, ageist, ableist and LGBTQ-phobic behavior, we pass up brilliant minds and incredible talent. Some of the smartest people I know are not people that would be described as alpha. When you pass them up because they’re not exactly what you had in mind, you’re the one losing out.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The Linkspam Who Rides Like a Man (10th August, 2014)

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

GF classifieds (August and September 2014)

This is another round of Geek feminism classifieds. Sorry we missed July! If you’re looking to hire women, find some people to participate in your study, find female speakers, or just want some like-minded folk to join your open source project, this is the thread for you!

Here’s how it works:

  1. Geeky subjects only. We take a wide view of geekdom, but if your thing isn’t related to an obviously geeky topic, you’ll probably want to give a bit of background on why the readers of Geek Feminism would be interested.
  2. Explain what your project/event/thing is, or link to a webpage that provides clear, informative information about it. Ideally you’ll also explain why geek women might find it particularly awesome.
  3. Explain what you’re looking for. Even if it’s not a job ad, think of it like one: what is the activity/role in question, and what would it involve? What is the profile of people you’re looking for?
  4. GF has international readership, so please be sure to indicate the location if you’re advertising a job position, conference, or other thing where the location matters. Remember that city acronyms aren’t always known world-wide and lots of cities share names, so be as clear as possible! (That is, don’t say “SF[O]” or “NYC” or “Melb”, say “San Francisco, USA”, “New York City, USA” or “Melbourne, Australia”.) And if you can provide travel/relocation assistance, we’d love to know about it.
  5. Keep it legal. Most jurisdictions do not allow you to (eg.) advertise jobs for only people of a given gender. So don’t do that. If you are advertising for something that falls into this category, think of this as an opportunity to boost the signal to women who might be interested.
  6. If you’re asking for participants in a study, please note Mary’s helpful guide to soliciting research participation on the ‘net, especially the “bare minimum” section.
  7. Provide a way for people to contact you, such as your email address or a link to apply in the case of job advertisements. (The email addresses entered in the comment form here are not public, so readers won’t see them.)
  8. Keep an eye on comments here, in case people ask for clarification or more details. (You can subscribe to comments via email or RSS.)

If you’d like some more background/tips on how to reach out to women for your project/event/whatever, take a look at Recruiting women on the Geek Feminism Wiki.)

Good luck!