Tag Archives: classifieds

GF classifieds (October 2010)

I was just going to stick this in a linkspam:

  • The Anita Borg Institute for Women in in Technology is hiring! There are currently three positions available: Development Director, Marketing Manager and Manager, Research and Executive Programs. ABI does some pretty high-profile stuff for women in technology, including organizing the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. They’re located in Palo Alto, CA (USA).

But it reminded me that I often hear complaints from people who’d like to hire women but just don’t know where to advertise. ABI likely won’t have much trouble getting their message out to interested women since they’re at the centre of a huge network of technical women, but we’ve had a couple of discussions here on how hiring women can help with gender imbalance in open source, and how hiring women can be challenging and it’s clear that other organizations would like some help.

So I think that calls for another round of Geek feminism classifieds. If you’re looking to hire women, find some people to participate in your study, find female speakers, or just want some like-minded folk to join your open source project, this is the thread for you!

Here’s how it works:

  1. Geeky subjects only. We take a wide view of geekdom, but if your thing isn’t related to an obviously geeky topic, you’ll probably want to give a bit of background on why the readers of Geek Feminism would be interested.
  2. Explain what your project/event/thing is, or link to a webpage that provides clear, informative information about it. Ideally you’ll also explain why geek women might find it particularly awesome.
  3. Explain what you’re looking for. Even if it’s not a job ad, think of it like one: what is the activity/role in question, and what would it involve? What is the profile of people you’re looking for?
  4. GF has international readership, so please be sure to indicate the location if you’re advertising a job position, conference, or other thing where the location matters. Remember that city acronyms aren’t always known world-wide and lots of cities share names, so be as clear as possible! And if you can provide travel/relocation assistance, we’d love to know about it.
  5. Keep it legal. Most jurisdictions do not allow you to (eg.) advertise jobs for only people of a given gender. So don’t do that. If you are advertising for something that falls into this category, think of this as an opportunity to boost the signal to women who might be interested.
  6. If you’re asking for participants in a study, please note Mary’s additional suggestions regarding studies with human research subjects.
  7. Provide a way for people to contact you, such as your email address or a link to apply in the case of job advertisements. (The email addresses entered in the comment form here are not public, so readers won’t see them.)
  8. Keep an eye on comments here, in case people ask for clarification or more details. (You can subscribe to comments via email or RSS.)

Good luck!

GF classifieds: Google Summer of Code edition

Student applications for Google Summer of Code are opening March 29.

Google Summer of Code — yes, bad name for anyone in the southern hemisphere, but you are allowed to apply! — is a project sponsoring Open Source development by students (largely university students, students who won’t be 18 by April 26 can’t apply) over the northern summer period. Google pays a stipend for students to work on a contribution to a project over summer. Open Source projects are selected as mentoring organisations, students apply by submitting a project proposal to a project, and some of those proposals are accepted. Applications close April 9.

So I thought I’d do a post in the spirit of Skud’s GF classifieds. If you are a mentor or part of a mentoring organisation for Google SoC and you’d like to bring your project to the attention of readers here, please post a description in comments at any time before April 9. The more you can say the better:

  • Do you have link to a list of ideas for projects?
  • Can applicants make contact with you or your mentors in order to discuss their application before submitting?
  • Are previous years’ students available to discuss their experiences?
  • What kind of skills are you looking for?

Of course, if your project has made a commitment to diversity in some way, then feel free to tell us about that.

Students who are interested in applying: this is a big process, don’t wait for the official opening to get to work on researching and talking to mentoring organisations, as there are only two weeks between the open and close of applications. Here’s some starting points:

Note: obviously Google SoC projects accept applications from people of any gender. The reason for this post is to level the playing field at the awareness level. By posting here, what you’re doing is hopefully increasing the visibility of your project among interested women, rather than excluding anyone else from applying.

GF Classifieds

We’ve been saying for a while that we ought to do something like this, so here’s a first attempt.

I frequently get email from people who say that they’re trying to recruit women for events, projects, speaking gigs, research studies, or whatever. I sometimes wonder… what am I meant to do with these emails? I’m not just going to post them here every time. For one thing, it would be spamalicious, and for another, I quite often don’t know the event/project/etc in question and don’t have time to research it before implicitly endorsing it by posting the want ad.

So, this is going to be a semi-regular (I hope) place for people who are looking to reach out to women to post their information.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Geeky subjects only. We take a wide view of geekdom, but if your thing isn’t related to an obviously geeky topic, you’ll probably want to give a bit of background on why the readers of Geek Feminism would be interested.
  2. Explain what your project/event/thing is, or link to a webpage that provides clear, informative information about it. Ideally you’ll also explain why geek women might find it particularly awesome.
  3. Explain what you’re looking for. Think of it like a job ad: what is the activity/role in question, and what would it involve? What is the profile of people you’re looking for?
  4. Keep it legal. Most jurisdictions do not allow you to (eg.) advertise jobs for only people of a given gender. So don’t do that. If you are advertising for something that falls into this category, think of this as an opportunity to boost the signal to women who might be interested.
  5. Provide a way for people to contact you, such as your email address. The email address you enter in the comment form is not public, so don’t assume that readers can see it.
  6. Keep an eye on comments here, in case people ask for clarification or more details. (You can subscribe to comments via email or RSS.)

If you’d like some more background/tips on how to reach out to women for your project/event/whatever, take a look at Recruiting women on the Geek Feminism Wiki.

And, because this is the first time we’ve had this sort of thing, here are some examples of things that would be suitable to post:

  • If your workplace is hiring, and you’d like to see more women applying, you could post job ads here and tell us why geek women would love working there.
  • If you are an event organiser, you could use this to recruit speakers or attendees (be sure to mention any efforts you have taken to make your event women-friendly).
  • You could advertise for guest-bloggers or writers for geeky publications.

You get the idea. Good luck!