Tag Archives: google summer of code

Google Summer of Code 2012

My goal: inform women’s colleges about Google Summer of Code

Google Summer of Code 2012

Google Summer of Code 2012 - help me publicize this to college women!

If you have contacts at women’s colleges, let’s work to get a GSoC presentation there before March 20th. I’ll help.

Google’s open source team has now announced that Google Summer of Code 2012 will happen. Undergraduate and grad students at accredited colleges/universities around the world can get paid USD 5000 to work on open source projects as a full-time three-month internship.

Upcoming deadlines: 9 March, mentoring organizations need to submit their applications to participate. 6 April, student application deadline.

Open source software development is a rewarding and educational way for students to learn real-world software engineering skills, build portfolios, and network with industry and academe. Women coders especially find GSoC a good entry point because they can work from home with flexible hours, they get guaranteed personal mentorship, and the stipend lets them focus on their project for three solid months.

The best way to get in good applications is for organizers and students to start early, like, now. Students who download source code, learn how to hang out in IRC and submit patches in early March, and apply in late March are way more likely to get in (and to have a good experience) than those who start on April 2nd. So I want students to hear about GSoC (and hopefully about MediaWiki, my project) now. I’m willing to work to publicize GSoC this year and even if my project doesn’t get accepted, the other projects will benefit.

I successfully got multiple good proposals from women for my project last year, and this year I’d like to double that number. To that aim, I want to ensure that every women’s college in North America that has a CS department or a computer club gets informed about GSoC between now and March 20th, preferably with an in-person presentation. I started this effort in February and have already gotten some momentum; I spoke at Wellesley last week to much interest, and Scripps College held an info session today. But I need your help.

If your college isn’t on the list I set up, add it. If you can find contact information for one college listed on the wiki page, send them a note, and update the wiki page, that would be a huge help.

If you want goodies to hand out at a meetup, you can contact Google’s team. Let them know when you decide on a date, time, and location for a meetup so they can put it on the calendar. People have already prepared resources you can use: flyers, sample presentations, an email template, a list of projects that already have mentors listed, and more.

And of course, if you’re interested in applying, feel free to ask questions in the comments!

P.S. I’m only concentrating on North America because I figure that’s a limited and achievable goal; there are only about 50 women’s colleges with STEM curricula.  But GSoC caters to students worldwide. If you know of accredited women’s colleges outside North America that have CS curricula or programming clubs, please inform them and add them to the page. Thanks!

Death before linkspam (3rd April, 2011)

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the geekfeminism tag on delicious or the #geekfeminism tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Google Summer of Code 2011: application tips

Student applications for Google Summer of Code open March 28 and close April 8, but students are expected to begin talking to mentoring organisations now. The mentoring organisations for 2011 have just been announced.

Students who are interested in applying: this is a big process, don’t wait for the official opening to get to work on researching and talking to mentoring organisations, as there are only two weeks between the open and close of applications. Here’s some starting points:

Terri’s post from last year, Showing your awesomeness for Google Summer of Code has many more details.

If anyone wants to discuss experiences with applying to Summer of Code, or evaluating applications, please do so in this post!

Update: this thread is for discussing how best to apply to Summer of Code. So that that isn’t drowned out, use the classifieds post for advertising your project or projects you have worked on, and for general discussion of Google Summer of Code that isn’t on either of those topics, use the latest open thread.

GF classifieds: Google Summer of Code 2011 edition

Google Summer of Code–yes, bad name for anyone in the southern hemisphere, but you are allowed to apply!–is a project sponsoring Open Source development by students (largely university students, you have to be 18+ or turning 18 by April 25 to apply) over the northern summer period. Google pays a stipend for students to work on a contribution to a project over summer. Open Source projects are selected as mentoring organisations, students apply by submitting a project proposal to a project, and some of those proposals are accepted.

The mentoring organisations for 2011 have just been announced. Student applications open March 28 and close April 8, but students are expected to begin talking to mentoring organisations now.

So as with last year, here’s an edition of GF classifieds for mentoring organisations to reach out to readers here. If you are a mentor or part of a mentoring organisation for Google SoC and you’d like to bring your project to the attention of readers here, please post a description in comments at any time before April 2 (comments automatically close then). The more you can say the better:

  • Do you have link to a list of ideas for projects?
  • Can applicants make contact with you or your mentors in order to discuss their application before submitting?
  • Are previous years’ students available to discuss their experiences?
  • What kind of skills are you looking for?

Of course, if your project has made a commitment to diversity in some way, then feel free to tell us about that.

Former Summer of Code participants who worked on a project and liked it and found it welcoming or diverse, feel free to also promote your former project here, if they are mentoring again.

Note: obviously Google SoC projects accept applications from people of any gender. The reason for this post is to level the playing field at the awareness level. By posting here, what you’re doing is hopefully increasing the visibility of your project among interested women, rather than excluding anyone else from applying.

Update: this thread is for mentoring organisations and former mentees to promote themselves and their projects. So that that isn’t drowned out, use the application tips post for discussing how to apply, and for general discussion of Google Summer of Code that isn’t on either of those topics, use the latest open thread.

Linkspam vs. The World

If you have links of interest, please share them in comments here, or if you’re a delicious user, tag them “geekfeminism” to bring them to our attention. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links in comments and on delicious.

If She Can Do It, I Can Too

Leslie Hawthorn has just made another huge career change and will begin life as a consultant shortly after speaking on FOSS mentoring in Turkey and accepting an award from the National Center for Open Source and Education. Oh yes, and some vacation. :)

You can find her on identi.ca and Twitter.

A little over four years ago, I made a huge career change. While I loved talking to geeks all day, recruiting just wasn’t the right role for me. When Chris DiBona asked if I was interested in joining his team to help make Google Summer of Code happen for the second year, I was elated. I knew I had great organizational and project management skills. I knew I got along really well with programmers and loved to talk tech. I knew what the Summer of Code was – an awesome program to give jobs to students by giving them a chance to work on Open Source projects, and a great way for those projects to find new contributors. And I knew what open source software was in a general sense – everyone shares their code with everyone else. Sounded beautiful and idealistic. I was in!

What I didn’t know was, well, everything else. Sure, I used Firefox, but I was running Windows. I’d used GNOME about, oh, four years previously, but never to do anything but play music files and it wasn’t ever running on a computer I owned. I had never been on a mailing list before joining Google, and had never been on a mailing list outside the company. I hadn’t used IRC since high school. And did I mention that I don’t write code?

Now consider that the team I was joining consisted of the dude who used to talk about Linux on TV – oh yeah, and he’s now my boss – the then Chairman of the Apache Software Foundation, two of the lead developers of Subversion – those guys whose Poisonous People talk has more than 120,000 views on YouTube, and a dude who is an IP attorney in addition to being a compiler developer. A few months later, I’d be sharing a cube with the guy who literally wrote the book on Open Source software. No pressure, right?

Needless to say, I was intimated. Really intimidated. But I was also passionately excited about the chance to help people do good in the world, and that pushed me to get out there and get things done. I talked to some lawyers, knocked on the doors of some accounting types, wrote some documentation, kicked mIRC until I could figure out how to connect to Freenode, and created a channel called #gsoc. And the games began.

I spent the first few days hanging out, seeing who was there and trying to answer questions quickly and effectively. There were a lot of people in the channel who had participated in Summer of Code the year before talking about what a great program it was and how it really helped them become better coders, get a good job, and meet great new programmers for their projects. I knew I’d made the right choice in taking on this job. I also knew I had no idea what I was doing and that I was going to be found out for the Impostor I was at any second.

Suddenly, this amazing person burst into the channel, filled with praise for the program. I didn’t know who she was, but I surmised from her handle webchick that she was, well, a chick who worked on web stuff. She was infectiously enthusiastic about her work on Drupal, which I quickly Googled. I still didn’t know a Content Management System from a Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, but I quickly deduced that it was software that helped you make websites. Cool beans. I had played around with DreamWeaver a little bit back in the day. I could understand this stuff.

So I asked webchick if I was right and Drupal helps you create websites, figuring it was a stupid question but that I had to start learning sometime. She replied immediately telling me that I was right and that it was written in PHP – okay, good, I know what PHP is – and that she hadn’t worked on it before Summer of Code. I was astounded. I asked her to tell me more since I could only imagine that doing this kind of work required all kinds of experience, so she must had some really great classes at school or she wouldn’t have been able to learn so much so quickly.

To my surprise, she let all of us know that she had taken a few classes on web design at community college, but nothing that had really prepared her extensively for working on Drupal. She said that she’d been terrified of contributing to open source because it was just for geniuses but since she saw that Summer of Code was a program for students, she thought they’d be OK with someone who was a complete beginner. She’d been sucked in completely by Drupal and now spent morning, noon and night working on it. If I remember correctly, she’d already been hired by a Drupal consulting shop when we had that first fateful interaction.

I know webchick was just telling her story, but I can’t even begin to tell you how much what she said gave me confidence. I too attended community college and after walking through halls filled with Stanford PhDs for three years, I had a little bit of, um, degree shame. Sure, I graduated from Cal at the top of my class, but I only had an English degree and couldn’t possibly be as awesome as all those people around me who had only attended universities and had done advanced studies in Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence. Hrm. Maybe not.

I walked away from that IRC chat feeling so inspired. I knew if webchick had been successful, I could be too. She had passion for her subject, unbridled enthusiasm and the willingness to share her experiences. I had all those things, too. If those were the indicators of success, I could make it work, even if I didn’t know a darn thing yet.

One year later, I was promoted to be manager of the whole Summer of Code program. I started traveling the world to share stories like webchick’s with people so that they would be just as inspired by the wonder that is participating in the FOSS community. I started inviting the public to Google to hear about all the great work being done by famous open source developers who’d joined the company. Two years later, I launched one of the most widely read developer blogs at Google soon after and kept it fed with regular content. With the help of webchick and an awesome team of mentors, I then went on to create and launch the world’s first global initiative to get pre-university students involved in open source development. I might have had zero experience then, but now I was making things happen.

Four years after that chat in IRC, webchick, a.k.a. Angela Byron, is now the maintainer for Drupal 7. Even if you don’t know what a CMS is, you’ll be impressed to know that the software that Angie is currently in charge of is what powers whitehouse.gov. Angie was the recipient of one of five Google O’Reilly Open Source Awards for Best Contibutor in 2008. Being able to share that stage with her and put the award figurine in her hands remains one of the most shining moments of my life.

If you’re intimidated, you’re not alone. Don’t let that stop you. We all have to start somewhere and FOSS people who seem like deities to you were all new at this once, too. If Angie can do it and I can do it, you can too. Cease procrastination and begin your application for Google Summer of Code 2010.

And remember, even if you fall flat on your face, at least you know you’re moving forward.

See you in #gsoc on Freenode.

You’re not gonna reach my linkspam (31st March, 2010)

If you have links of interest, please share them in comments here, or if you’re a delicious user, tag them “geekfeminism†to bring them to our attention. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links in comments and on delicious.

Showing your awesomeness for Google Summer of Code

Some of you may have heard the story: When the GNOME folk looked through their summer of code applicants back in 2006, they had 181 applicants… and not a single woman. They decided to do something about this, and started The GNOME Women’s Outreach project. They soon had 100 talented female applicants. You can read the whole story here. One of the lessons to take away from this is that there may be really talented women out there who just aren’t applying:

Women would contact us saying “oh I don’t know if I’m qualified enough but working with a mentor sounds good etc etc etc and then have REALLY impressive CVs — clearly they’d’ve been accepted to GSoC if they’d applied, but they were clearly not confident enough to do so.

We at geek feminism hate losing talented folk to Impostor Syndrome, which causes totally awesome people to believe that they aren’t good enough. So for those of you who are considering applying this year, I’m hoping we can boost your confidence by reminding you that projects want you, providing some tips on making an application that will get noticed (so you can’t say “oh, I’ll never get it”), and giving you another place to ask questions if you’re too shy to ask them elsewhere. We can also help with applications and maybe even introduce you to people if you’re just too shy to get your foot in the door — just ask!

Lots of readers of and writers for Geek Feminism have been involved in GSoC. I’m one of the mentors for Systers, which might be especially interesting to GF readers since we’re an organization that promotes and supports women in technology (the name “Systers” is a play on women in “systems”). You can read my blurb advertising the incredible awesomeness of my project here and there’s lots of other cool summer of code projects advertising on GF.

The most common question I’m getting from prospective students right now is, “What do you look for in a GSoC applicant, and how can I make my application stand out?.”

There’s lots of things we look for in a GSoC applicant, but we most of all we want someone who’ll get stuff done, and with whom we’ll enjoy working.

Here’s some tips for demonstrating your inner awesomeness:

  1. Get involved with the community early. Join the mailing list(s), hang out on IRC, or wherever the community is. That lets both you and us know if we’ll work well together, and lets you learn more so you can put together an awesome application that we’ll all be excited about. If you participate in discussions, we’re much more likely to remember you when your application comes in! (Hint: if you’re using a nickname, remember to put that name in your application too so we can associate!) The earlier the better when it comes to community involvement — you don’t need to wait ’till the applications open.
  2. Spend some time doing research on your proposed project: Find out if anyone’s tried it, what other approaches are possible and how your idea compares to them. If you’ve done this research in advance, we know you’ll be ready to go when summer hits!
  3. Ask smart questions. If there’s something about the project you don’t understand or you’re trying to do a bit of hacking and run into a snag, the mentors will often be able to help. One of the things I’m looking for in applicants is an ability to communicate, and asking articulate questions that show you’ve done research is one way to impress me. I’m also looking for applicants who can work independently and figure out stuff on your own, so if you do get stuck, remember to explain what you’ve tried, and where you’ve already looked for information so I know you made the effort to solve the problem yourself.
  4. Contribute to the project in advance. One of my prospective students has started writing patches to fix our simple bugs, and it tells me so much about her: that she’s already getting comfortable with our code base, that she’s dedicated enough to find solutions to problems, that she’s really serious about contributing to our project. Another way to contribute would be through helping others such as answering questions on the mailing lists or IRC or contributing to the project wiki. Show off your skills!
  5. Don’t be afraid to apply! Even if you don’t get in, the GSoC application period is a great time to scope out a project because there are mentors who you know are willing to answer questions. You don’t need GSoC: you can always choose to join the project on your own. But don’t forget that lots of really talented folk misjudge their own awesomeness, so don’t pre-reject yourself. You might be exactly what that project needs!

So now I open up the floor to everyone else: If you’re a mentor, what impresses you? If you’re a former student, what tips do you have? If you’re a prospective student, what else would you like to know? Feel free to ask for help with your applications or ask if we can introduce you to someone in your project too!

GF classifieds: Google Summer of Code edition

Student applications for Google Summer of Code are opening March 29.

Google Summer of Code — yes, bad name for anyone in the southern hemisphere, but you are allowed to apply! — is a project sponsoring Open Source development by students (largely university students, students who won’t be 18 by April 26 can’t apply) over the northern summer period. Google pays a stipend for students to work on a contribution to a project over summer. Open Source projects are selected as mentoring organisations, students apply by submitting a project proposal to a project, and some of those proposals are accepted. Applications close April 9.

So I thought I’d do a post in the spirit of Skud’s GF classifieds. If you are a mentor or part of a mentoring organisation for Google SoC and you’d like to bring your project to the attention of readers here, please post a description in comments at any time before April 9. The more you can say the better:

  • Do you have link to a list of ideas for projects?
  • Can applicants make contact with you or your mentors in order to discuss their application before submitting?
  • Are previous years’ students available to discuss their experiences?
  • What kind of skills are you looking for?

Of course, if your project has made a commitment to diversity in some way, then feel free to tell us about that.

Students who are interested in applying: this is a big process, don’t wait for the official opening to get to work on researching and talking to mentoring organisations, as there are only two weeks between the open and close of applications. Here’s some starting points:

Note: obviously Google SoC projects accept applications from people of any gender. The reason for this post is to level the playing field at the awareness level. By posting here, what you’re doing is hopefully increasing the visibility of your project among interested women, rather than excluding anyone else from applying.