Tag Archives: Linkspam

You Can’t Hurry Linkspam (14 December 2014)

  • Margaret Hamilton, lead software engineer, Project Apollo | Medium (December 8): Margaret Hamilton “was all of 31 when the Apollo 11 lunar module landed on the moon, running her code. (Apollo 11 was able to land at all only because she designed the software robustly enough to handle buffer overflows and cycle-stealing.)”
  • Pick Up Artist Simulator Web Game Is Surprisingly the Greatest Thing | The Mary Sue (December 12): “The game is a tongue-in-cheek look at how slimy and transparent these dumb tactics are and that some of them might get you f***ing maced—and you’d deserve it.”
  • On Interviewing as a Junior Dev | Liz Rush (December 8): “I wanted to share my interviewing and job hunting story with you along with what I’ve learned about good hiring. My peers and I have become a de facto curiosity as the first women to graduate Ada. While we all had different experiences interviewing for our first real dev roles, we are also a great subject to reflect on what it’s like to try to get a job as women, as alternative learners, as minorities, and as new talent.”
  • Women In Science Postcards | Etsy: Gift idea
  • Encyclopedia Frown | Slate (December 11): CW: Discussion of harassment “With the Arbitration Committee opting only to ban the one woman in the dispute despite her behavior being no worse than that of the men, it’s hard not to see this as a setback to Wikipedia’s efforts to rectify its massive gender gap.”
  • Walter Lewin, the art of teaching, and physics’ gender problem | Medium (December 10): “I suspect, though I cannot prove, that as soon as you decide that performance in your field is due mostly to some kind of innate ability, you stop respecting diversity in many ways. You stop respecting diversity of thought, because you’ve just picked one learning style and decided that it’s the only one worth teaching to. And I suspect — although, again, I cannot prove — that you stop respecting diversity of gender or race. After all, if success is all about some kind of innate ability, then there must be some reason why everyone who exhibits it looks the same.”
  • Solidarity against online harassment | Tor (December 12): “We do high-profile work, and over the past years, many of us have been the targets of online harassment. The current incidents come at a time when suspicion, slander, and threats are endemic to the online world. They create an environment where the malicious feel safe and the misguided feel justified in striking out online with a thousand blows. Under such attacks, many people have suffered — especially women who speak up online. Women who work on Tor are targeted, degraded, minimized and endure serious, frightening threats.
    This is the status quo for a large part of the internet. We will not accept it.”
  • How to Uphold White Supremacy by Focusing on Diversity and Inclusion | Model View Culture (December 10): “Liberalism as an ideology deems equal rights and equal treatment as a higher priority than  material justice, or as an effective means towards  it. Its presumptions of equality are false, as individualist equality may be written into law and policy while material inequality thrives. It effectively abstracts and obscures power dynamics along lines of race, class, and gender.”
  • Codes of Conduct: When Being Excellent is Not Enough | Model View Culture (December 10): “the most common argument from organizers who opposed codes of conduct ran something like this: since we are all professionals sharing mutual respect for one another, there is no need to add layers of bureaucracy to enforce standards that already exist informally.”
  • You Are What You Wear: The Dangerous Lessons Kids Learn From Sexist T-Shirts | Huff Post Women (December 3): “Even subtle messaging about girls’ and boys’ roles — in the media, in society and on clothing — affects the way kids see themselves.”
  • At a geek feminist meet-up in Ballarat | Elephant Woman (December 12): “the magic of the weekend wasn’t so much in the ideas as it was about the alchemy of the whole experience. Women coming together to talk about problems and coming up with solutions; women who identified as being feminists as well as being geeks of various kinds.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Digital Millenium Linkspam Act (12 December 2014)


We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Linkspam arrived on time, was as described (December 9 2014)

  • Why women are leaving the tech industry in droves | LA Times (December 5): “In 2008, the Harvard Business Review published a landmark report on women in tech, “The Athena Factor,” which found that the mid-career point is the most dangerous time for women. Just as their male colleagues’ careers are taking off, women’s start to stall, with those who’ve reached the beginning ranks of management reporting feeling blocked in moving up because they don’t have a mentor, a sponsor or a road map.”
  • CNN’s Van Jones Speaks on Tech’s Digital “Cotton Pickers” | Re/code (December 4): “you deserve to be more than just digital cotton pickers in the information age. You need to be uploading and not downloading. Your genius should be tapped.”
  • Hacked documents reveal a Hollywood studio’s stunning gender and race gap | Fusion (December 1): According to leaked data, “the upper pay echelon of Sony Pictures is 94 percent male, and 88 percent white.”
  • Does Sex Make Science Fiction “Soft?” | Uncanny Magazine (November/December Issue): “How much kissing and flirting can a story take before it doesn’t deserve to be called science fiction any more? Yes, that was a trick question.”
  • On the 25th Anniversary of École Polytechnique | Julie Pagano (December 6): “This event is notable to me and often thought about because it is a reminder that people do exist who not only intend harm against women, but will actually carry it out. This isn’t an isolated incident — another mass killing targeting women happened this year in California. Many smaller incidents happen all the time. I think about it often. I can’t not.” Content notice: violence, violence against women, mass shooting
  • Programmers: Please don’t ever say this to beginners … | Philip Guo (November): “Haha, psssh, PHP is so dumb. You should learn Ruby on Rails, deploy on Heroku, and code in Vim. TextMate is for n00bs. Oh, then move onto some Node.js, that’s sweeeeet. non-blocking I/O w000000t.” Why expert coders can be crappy teachers.
  • My Career is not about Stopping Gamergate | Space Channel 6 (December 7:) “This is the thankless task I’ve signed up for. If I were being honest – I’m more than a little resentful. The vast majority of our male-dominated games press wrote a single piece condemning Gamergate and has been radio silent ever since. The publishers are silent, the console makers are silent. And so, Anita, Zoe, Randi and myself are out here doing the majority of the work, while everyone whines about wanting it to be over.”
  • Infographic: Gender Gap – Women in Technology | Lucidworks (December 4): “Here’s a snapshot of the gender gap in technology and how it compares to the rest of the workforce – and why we should reprogram the gender balance”

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    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    The Linkspam Jargon File (December 7 2014)

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    Actually, it’s about ethics in linkspam journalism (5 December 2014)


    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    The linkspam will continue until the morale improves (30 November 2014)

     

    • Happy 100th birthday, Hedy Lamarr! And Wikipedia woes | Zara Rahman: On Hedy Lamarr’s Wikipedia page: “Before the fact that she co-invented the thing that allows us to have wireless communications today, comes a comment that some director made about her being “beautiful”, and, even worse, “exotic”.” Multiple edits to alter this have been reverted.
    • Economic warfare in FOSS | Michael Hall: How to destroy a project rather than compete with it, and some steps to take to counteract this.
    • Hey, Kids! Comics! Wonder Woman #36 | Doomrocket: “Wonder Woman is now drawn by someone who shies away from calling her a feminist, and is written by someone with so little grasp of her character they have her carrying around a plush toy on the Justice League jet. Of late, DC has had so many successful relaunches and new titles aimed at us ladies, and it breaks my heart that the Amazonian matriarch of female superhero comics could now be so very, very far off the mark William Moulton Marston made back in 1941.”
    • WW2: Winifred Roberts’ Bletchley Park work cracking Enigma code | BBC: “Winifred Roberts was 25 when she was plunged into the top secret world of Bletchley Park, where mathematician Alan Turing had been carrying out his code-breaking work on the Enigma machine. It was a secret she kept from her family for decades. Now aged 96, she talks about the time her life dramatically changed and the role she played in such an important part of the war effort.”
    • Metafoundry 15: Scribbled Leatherjackets – Homo Fabber | Deb Chachra: “It’s not, of course, that there’s anything wrong with making (although it’s not all that clear that the world needs more stuff). It’s that the alternative to making is usually not doing nothing—it’s nearly always doing things for and with other people, from the barista to the Facebook community moderator to the social worker to the surgeon. Describing oneself as a maker—regardless of what one actually  or mostly does—is a way of accruing to oneself the gendered, capitalist benefits of being a person who makes products.”
    • Why I don’t like hackathons, by Alex Bayley aged 39 1/2: “Here’s what I want instead: Ongoing projects, that are maintained and used over several years. A welcoming environment for people of all skill and confidence levels, with opportunity for mentorship, learning, and working at your own pace. A schedule that makes it possible to participate without having to make heroic efforts to juggle your other responsibilities.”
    • [Trigger warning: graphic death threats, threats of violence] The Supreme Court is about to tackle online threats for the first time | The Verge: “A threat counts as a threat if a “reasonable person” would think the statement is a threat.” “This is the standard with virtually every other crime: whether the defendant intended to cause harm.” “However, when it comes to the Internet, where context or tone may be more difficult to perceive, this objective standard has obvious drawbacks: is the “reasonable person” going to be a teenager who plays League of Legends or a grandfather posting on a fly fishing forum?”

     

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    The Phantom Linkspam

    • Where do programmers work? Help us show the world | The Media Show (November 24): “We want to show as many kinds of people as we can programming. People of color. Queer and trans folks; men and women. Older and younger folks. People with disabilities. People with tiny kids running around them while they code.”
    • The Data on Diversity | Communications of the ACM (November 2014 issue): “Diverse teams are more effective: they produce better financial results and better results in innovation. These results show that having a diverse organization is a business imperative.”
    • Women ‘belittled, underappreciated and underpaid’ in tech industry | The Guardian (November 21): “Beyond structural gender disparities, many respondents complained of a “macho, misogynist culture”, with bosses organising events at strip clubs, and frequent commentary on women’s bodies the norm.”
    • Your groundbreaking is not my groundbreaking | N.K. Jemisin (November 25): “I’m pretty sure nobody in the planning meetings for this game went Muahahaha, now we can really stick it to those curly-haired, dark-skinned people!* I think they just started from a completely different set of assumptions about what is “normal”, than… well, what actually is normal to a lot of people. And those assumptions have skewed the whole bell curve of the game.”
    • My Magical Experience at Geek Girl Con | Black Girl Nerds (November 19): “This is why conventions like this exist.  It is to illustrate in such a magical way that you are not the only Black geek girl or queer geek girl, or fat geek girl, or disabled geek girl.  There is a place for you in this community and you have friends and fellow geekettes out there who are willing to support you and tell you that you need not to fear being a member of geekdom.”
    • “I’m so done with it”: Conservationist speaks out against sexism in science | Retraction Watch (November 24): “I think there’s been a sea change in conservation and conservation science. We’re seeing a shift…a lot of discussion about diversity of culture and diversity of gender in conservation science. It’s up to all of us to speak out and say, this is not ok in our community. We’re just not gonna take it.”
    • Pro Star Craft 2 Player Makes Rape Comment about Female Opponent, Gets Booted from Tournament | The Mary Sue (November 24): “I’ve spent some time in competitive gaming myself, and I can’t count the awkward confrontations I’ve gotten into over other gamers—friends, even—throwing around “rape” and other words that they shouldn’t. Unfortunately, most of the time the comments go unanswered, which leads to impressionable players getting the idea that they’re acceptable and even funny things to say.”
    • It’s Not about that Damn Shirt | Women in Astronomy (November 20): “Women said “Dude, wearing that shirt is not cool”. Men are now spending days telling those women the graphic, specific ways they would like to rape and murder them.”
    • No Title, by Marie Connelly | The Pastry Box Project (November 24): “When we talk about platforms, about social networks, we often focus primarily on the technology. Yet in my time as a community manager, I have found that community is rarely about the technology itself—a platform is nothing without the people who use it. And right now, we are losing people. We are losing people who have wisdom and insight and so much to share, because public participation on the web has become increasingly more dangerous.”
    • #Gamergate as a response to re-engineering: BPC as a conspiracy to change computing | Computing Ed (November 23): “We in the Broadening Participation in Computing (BPC) community are aiming to achieve a similar kind of social engineering that the Gamergate supporters are complaining about.  I am part of a vast, international (though maybe not particularly well-organized) conspiracy to change computing culture and to invade computing with many women and members of under-represented groups. We are “actively plotting to influence” computing.

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    That’s The Way I Linkspam It (26 November 2014)

    • Twine, the Video Game Technology For All | New York Times Magazine: “Although plenty of independent games venture where mainstream games fear to tread, Twine represents something even more radical: the transformation of video games into something that is not only consumed by the masses but also created by them. A result has been one of the most fascinating and diverse scenes in gaming. The very nature of Twine poses a simple but deeply controversial question: Why shouldn’t more people get to be a part of games? Why shouldn’t everybody?”
    • 25 Tips for Diverse Hiring | Model View Culture: “In order to be successful with diverse recruiting, tech companies must invest in analysis and improvement at every stage of the hiring process. In this post, we offer a 101-style guide to top areas of focus, with specific suggestions to improve your hiring process and build more diverse teams.”
    • Ambling Along the Aqueduct: Sexual Harssment and Public Space: “I think that the difference for the second decade of the twenty-first century lies in the stunning, important fact that women are increasingly claiming a place in public space and are consequently transforming public discourse in ways that challenge male entitlement to a serious degree… The implication is that women are in public space on sufferance, as special cases, being given privileges that can be revoked for any one of a number of arbitrary reasons, usually amounting to not in some ways being above rubies.”
    • Casual sexism in scientific journal leads to editor’s note | Retraction Watch: “The Elsevier journal Biological Conservation has put out an apology, but not a retraction, after outcry over a bizarre, misogynistic non sequitur in a book review by Duke conservation biologist Stuart Pimm.”
    • Funding – linux.conf.au 2015 | 12 – 16 Jan | BeAwesome: “Apps close December 9. LCA 2015 and InternetNZ are proud to support diversity. The InternetNZ Diversity Programme is one way we ensure that LCA 2015 continues to be an open and welcoming conference for everyone. Together with InternetNZ this program has been created to assist under-represented delegates who contribute to the Open Source community but, without financial assistance, would not be able to attend LCA 2015.”
    • How Blacks and Latin@s Are Left Out of Tech Hiring by Stephanie Morillo | Model View Culture: “In other words, the qualified CS graduates of color tech claims it cannot find not only exist, but are actually being turned down for jobs in the very industry that says it cannot find them. For Blacks and Latin@s with dreams of going into tech and the social mobility it brings, this means that possessing credentials — and the increased networking opportunities that stem from respected CS programs — are not enough to erase the hidden (and not hidden) biases in tech’s hiring practices. The message that this then sends to younger generations of Blacks and Latin@s is clear: you need not apply.”
    • Barbie Remixed: I Really Can Be a Computer Engineer: “I happen to study remix, so one of my first thoughts upon seeing this was: someone is obviously going to remix this. I figured, why wait? I also have at my disposal my roommate Miranda Parker, a student of Mark Guzdial, who studies computing education and broadening participation in STEM. So with her input, I rewrote the book with a slightly different spin. (I also kept her as a “computer engineer” even though she’s really more of a computer scientist, software developer, etc.)  I hope you like this new narrative better, too!”
    • Engaging With Hateful People in Your Community Lends Legitimacy to Their Presence: “So why do you men get to care about the bigoted arguments and even engage & rebut? Because you’re unlikely to be targeted. They read as ‘abhorrent’ to you, but not as ‘threat to your safety’. Good for you! But for me, the presence of this person is a problem. When I see a male supremacist show up in an online space, the likelihood that I will participate drops to zero.”
    • No Solution | Medium: “If your coworker has chosen to share their story and truth, please respond with empathy and understanding. If empathy isn’t something hard wired into you, here are some tips: Listen as though it’s your only job. Avoid the urge to tune out. Avoid the urge to form counter arguments or move into defensive thinking. Avoid the urge to be “right”. Avoid the urge to critique.”

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    The Desolation of Linkspam

    • Men Explain Technology to Me: On Gender, Ed-Tech, and the Refusal to Be Silent: Hack Education (November 18th): “There’s a problem with the Internet. Largely designed by men from the developed world, it is built for men of the developed world. Men of science. Men of industry. Military men. Venture capitalists. Despite all the hype and hope about revolution and access and opportunity that these new technologies will provide us, they do not negate hierarchy, history, privilege, power. They reflect those. They channel it. They concentrate it, in new ways and in old.”
    • Uber Executive Suggests Digging Up Dirt on Journalists | BuzzFeed (November 17th): “A senior executive at Uber suggested that the company should consider hiring a team of opposition researchers to dig up dirt on its critics in the media — and specifically to spread details of the personal life of a female journalist who has criticized the company.”
    • The moment I learned just how far Uber will go to silence journalists and attack women | PandoDaily (November 17th):  “I have known many of Uber’s key investors and founders personally for six to ten years. Over that time I’ve seen an ever-worsening frat culture where sexist jokes and a blind eye here-or-there have developed into a company where the worst kind of smearing and objectification of women is A-ok.”
    • Gender, Race, and the Supernatural: Appreciating Sleepy Hollow’s Abbie Mills | Ms. Magazine Blog (October 29th): “Still, it’s one of the few shows featuring a black woman character who is not only kicking butt and taking names in her various encounters with demons, sorcerers, ghosts and zombies, but is constantly saving our white male hero and acculturating him into our 21st-century era: including driving automobiles, learning which mobile phone devices are the most up-to-date, and more recently, practicing yoga.”
    • Sweden Considers Special Labels for Sexist Video Games | Time (November 16th): “A government-funded innovation agency in Sweden is considering creating specials label for video games based on whether or not the games’ portrayals of women are sexist.”
    • Update: the following two links criticize Sweet Peach as described by Austen Heinz and Gilad Gome. Founder Audrey Hutchinson says her company, aiming to produce individualised probiotic mixes for vaginal use, was seriously misrepresented (November 23).
      • These Startup Dudes Want to Make Women’s Private Parts Smell Like Fresh Fruit | Inc (November 21): “At the DEMO conference in San Jose, California, on Wednesday afternoon, Heinz and Gome outlined their shared vision and previewed plans for a new probiotic supplement that will enable women to change the way their vaginas smell. Called Sweet Peach, it will be made using Cambrian Genomics’ DNA printing technology and financed through a campaign on the crowdfunding platform Tilt.”
      • How Not to Disrupt Women’s Bodies | Inc (November 21st): “Since time immemorial, beauty and feminine hygiene companies have used the promise of personal empowerment to help sell equally reprehensible, if much more subtle, campaigns based around negging women and then offering the solution to all of their bodily imperfections. Or smells. Especially smells. Poor Sweet Peach, trying to put a “probiotic supplement” gloss on what’s essentially the boring old douche market.”
    • Three Tactics that Block Women from Getting Ahead | Accidentally in Code (November 19th): “There are different kinds of gendered experiences. The outright sexual harassment, versions of “get back in the kitchen” is one, but another is patterns of behaviour that happen over, and over again to women, but much more rarely to men. It’s behaviour that men feel more OK with exhibiting towards women, because subconsciously they know they are much more likely to get away with it.”
    • Meet the Women Challenging the Media and Tech Establishments | Fast Company (November 17): “Not many journalists would leave a high-profile job at one of America’s most storied newspapers to create their own startup. But that’s exactly what former Wall Street Journal reporter Jessica Lessin did last year when she founded the tech news site The Information.”
    • Tech Freedom vs. Feminism | On the Left (November 19): “Several prominent tech freedom organisations choose to align themselves with and refuse to depose these kinds of men, no matter how horrible the shit against them is. The men themselves get away with harassing and abusing women because they are seen as being ‘valuable’ to the movement. Once you’re up on a tech freedom pedestal, it seems like it’s impossible for someone to bring you down.”

     

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    Comfort me with links, for I am sick of spam (18 November 2014)

    • 55 works of iconic Indian writer released on Wikisource under a free licence | Wikimedia blog: “A total of 55 Kannada books by Niranjana are re-licensed. “This is the single largest and most comprehensive individual collection of a writer to be released under CC-BY-SA 4.0 in any of the Indian languages so far,” says Kannada Wikimedian Omshivaprakash.”
    • Over 9000: A game about visibility online when you’re a woman, made by Maddy Myers
    • Job Listings That Don’t Alienate (with images, tweets) · kissane | Storify: “I asked for people from communities that are underrepresented in their fields to talk about language in job descriptions that makes them back away, and the reverse—wording or specification that feel inviting. I got a lot of replies. If you make listings/do hiring, you should probably read them.
    • Barbie book about programming tells girls they need boys to code for them | The Daily Dot: “The latest affront to basic decency in gendered toy marketing comes from a Barbie book that tells girls they can’t be game developers or programmers…  Despite its encouraging title, Marenco’s book actually tells preteen girls that Barbie can only contribute to the design of the game she’s building.”
    • What a Huge Difference Those Little Actions Make | Medium: “I’m looking for more examples of positive stories from women in tech. I want to publish a collection of them — a LOT of them — in the hopes that reading them will make more people take that extra step to be welcoming and encouraging. To take that little step that costs nothing but might mean everything to a new, tired, or discouraged coworker.”
    • Night Witches by Bully Pulpit Games | Kickstarter: “Night Witches is a tabletop RPG about Soviet airwomen during World War Two, flying daring night time bombing missions in biplanes.”
    • How It Feels to Land a Spacecraft on a Comet | New York Times: Physicist, woman, person of color Claudia Alexander on landing a spacecraft on a comet: “Once we started getting the data, we are getting what we expected to get, and we know that the field is going to benefit from having made the effort to get this accomplished. It’s a wonderful feeling.”
    • Not All Nerds | The New Inquiry: “Silicon Valley monopolizes our national ideas about the future, aided by a presumption that the industry is exceptionally progressive when it comes to race. It’s this monopoly that turns the idea of putting iPads in the hands of every child into an urgent need. If we are to challenge Silicon Valley as the shining embodiment and most aggressive promulgator of a neoliberal future, then we need to attack its futurity. We can start by emphasizing how woefully retrograde it is—how 19th century its economics are, certainly, but especially its racial politics.”
    • Weather forecasters predict better services for women | Thomson Reuters Foundation: “Michel Jarraud, secretary-general of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), said progress had been made in improving weather forecasts and climate services to protect lives and livelihoods. ‘But if we are to help communities cope with long-term climate change and the anticipated increase in hazards like floods and heat waves, then we need to do more to reach out to women with gender-sensitive services,’ he said.”
    • Pandora Releases Its Staff Diversity Statistics | Complex: “Are we supposed to believe that there are no black, Asian, or Latino people out there that have expertise in music? This is especially strange if you consider that most of the Pandora consumer base is minorities.”
    • Sartorial Misogyny, Feminist Concern Trolling, and the “Little Things”  | Shakesville: “When feminist concern trolls like Dawkins whine about the misuse of feminism, talking about feminism like it’s meant to be kept under glass, broken only in case of a ‘real’ and ‘serious’ emergency, they’re deliberately ignoring how culture works. The ‘little things’ don’t happen in a vacuum, but are part of a spectrum of expressed misogyny that forms a systemic oppression of women.”

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.