Tag Archives: Linkspam

Linkspam Directory Access Protocol (25 August 2015)

 

  • TechFestNW: Zoe Quinn on turning her body into a cyborg lab | Malia Spencer at Portland Techflash (21 August): “Quinn, an independent video game reviewer (many know her as one of those harassed in the Gamergate debacle) has two elective implants. One is an NFC chip in her hand, a procedure she did herself. The other is a magnet implanted into her left ring finger.”
  • Women in Tech: It’s Complicated | Natalie at The Bias (18 August): “Now, despite the fact that most of my work does involve writing some sort of code to manipulate and display or transform information, I usually don’t feel like I’m a “”woman in tech.”
  • Nerd Culture Has a Problem | Justin Denis at Everyday Feminism (20 August):”Because nerd women have been around for as long as nerd men have been around. They’ve just been shoved to the sideline and not included in anything as the result of some very systematic misogyny. The gaming industry and other parts of nerd culture have, by and large, been run by and for men. And when you act surprised that a woman is into something nerdy, you’re insinuating, whether intentional or not, that it’s unusual or weird.”
  • On Queer Deadpool and Bisexual Erasure in Comics | Megan Purdy at Women Write about Comics (20 August): “What we talk about when we talk about a queer Deadpool, queer Storm, or queer Hercules, is the pattern of bisexual erasure in comics; the foreclosure on the possibility of inclusion. For all the on page proof-of-queer that readers and even other creators assemble, there is always a counter-narrative working against it. Sometimes it takes the form of a straight-wash side-step in the form of a sudden and definitive heterosexual romance, designed to crowd queer romance off the stage. Sometimes it takes the form of a speech from on high, a reminder from creators or editors that they decide who lives and dies.”
  • Interstellar Cinderella | Meg Hunt (2015): “Interstellar Cinderella is a galactic riff on the classic fairy tale in which the magenta-haired heroine dreams of being a space mechanic who fixes robots all day. Inspired by classic sci-fi and couture fashion, the world of Interstellar Cinderella is filled with rich details. There’s a fairy god-bot, cute aliens, a dashing prince, and stars and galaxies swirling around. Throughout it all Cinderella zips throughout the story with a can-do spirit, a DIY attitude, and loads of charm.”
  • Women In History | craftykryptonitealpaca: “I grew up believing that women had contributed nothing to the world until the 1960′s. So once I became a feminist I started collecting information on women in history, and here’s my collection so far, in no particular order.”
  • Exquisite Corpse | New Criticals (30 April): “Nonetheless the potential of the Internet, as a past proposition or future projection, is still very much up for grabs. Online, women are still subjected to many of the inequalities that exist ‘in real life’. In fact the Internet may not ‘leveled the field’ but in many ways intensified, accelerated, and extended material embodied inequalities into a so-called immaterial disembodied Internet.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Linkspam Green is People!! (21 August 2015)

 

  • SF Women of the 20th Century: Introduction | tansyrr.com (18 August): “[W]hile 20th century science fiction is so often framed as a masculine genre, as a sexist genre, as a boys club, and as a hub of male geekery, male childhood, male second childhood and a world peopled by old white men, it was always a place where women existed, and worked, and played, and created wonderful things.”
  • No, I don’t trust your conference without a Code of Conduct | Perpendicular Angel Design (14 August): “A clear, transparent, well-written code of conduct is step 1 of winning my trust. Enforcing that code of conduct *with the biggest burden affecting those who do wrong* is step 2. If there is a step 3, it’s that you communicate to the industry what you did, why, and what you might do differently in the future.”
  • Signal Boost: GG attacks SXSW panels on online safety, harassment, and VR. | Jacqueline Wernimont (18 August): “[T]he South by Southwest (SXSW) festival in Austin uses a crowdsourced approval method for its panels, taking into account online voting to see which proposed panels get approved. Three panels proposed for SXSW Interactive — about gaming and interactive media — are being attacked by GamerGate right now. One of them, a panel about VR, isn’t even related to feminism or social justice issues but is being targeted anyway because Brianna Wu is on it.”
  • [Trigger Warning: Examples of harassment discussed in detail] Almost No One Sided with #GamerGate: A Research Paper on the Internet’s Reaction to Last Year’s Mob | Superheroes in Racecars (17 August): “The results of this project suggest that the vast majority of people do in fact equate GamerGate with online harassment, sexism, and/or misogyny. More people see GamerGate as a toxic mob rather than a legitimate movement worthy of respect.”
  • Teen girls play video games, but they minimize their contact with other players. Boys, on the other hand, use games to socialize. | Slate (18 August): “No one should blame women and girls for choosing to play games in a way that renders them invisible to the larger gaming community, but an unfortunate side effect of this is that many guys who play are under the impression that it’s therefore a male hobby.”
  • [Trigger Warning: Brief description of harassment]How To (Accidentally) Build A More Female-Friendly Game | Medium (18 August): “In Ingress, by the time you learn someone’s gender, you’ve already seen how they play. Eventually as you get into hangouts and communities, people are going to learn you are female — but they are also going to be meeting you in real life at the same time and also see you as a valuable contributor. It humanizes that interaction. So the would-be trolls don’t have that time period where the only piece of information they have about you is that you are a woman, which makes it harder to troll. ”
  • [Trigger Warning: Brief description of harassment]Why Stack Overflow is a Good Workplace for Women | Medium (11 August): “Be careful with “Cultural Fit”. This is often a catch-all for a vague sense of “would not fit in”, which can come to mean “is like me”. If you feel someone is a good or bad cultural fit, you must explain what you mean.
    Valid “Cultural Fit” things: self-motivated, passionate, gets stuff done, cares about open source / giving back to the community, likes “default open”, hates office politics / meetings, pragmatic attitude towards tools / best practices, etc.
    Invalid “Cultural Fit” things: obvious stuff like race, gender, sexual orientation, religion but also softer things like age, personality or hobbies (does not have to like Magic the Gathering to be a good dev). Assume that your bias is to hire people you “like” and be very careful of that.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Rolling On the Floor Linkspamming (18 August 2015)

 

  • Gayme Corner: “Videogames for Humans” and the Intimate, Playful Engagement of Twine | Robin on Autostraddle (12 August): “A lot of the most well-known Twine games are written by trans women, which is pretty rad, though Merritt Kopas points out that, “Few of these authors are accorded the respect, attention, or monetary success of their white male counterparts,” and within the community, it’s mostly white trans women whose work is recognized. Even so, Twine has great potential. “Authors are doing things with Twine that aren’t possible with traditional text. And at the same time, they’re using interactive media to tell stories that mainstream videogames couldn’t dream of telling,” Kopas said.”
  • The CW’s Female Executive Producers Talk Telling Women’s Stories | Teresa Jusino on The Masy Sue (12 August): “The CW’s session at the Television Critics Association summer tour earlier this week gives us so much reason to hope. After their main presentation, where they debuted their upcoming show from Aline Brosh McKenna called Crazy Ex-Girlfriend, eight female executive producers from The CW took to the stage in a panel called Running the Show: The Women Executive Producers of The CW and spoke honestly and optimistically about being women in the television industry and what they’re doing to help other women thrive in the business.”
  • ReThink | Trisha Prabhu: “Passionate to stop cyberbullying in adolescents, I created the patented product “ReThink” that stops cyberbullying at the source, before the bullying occurs, before the damage is done! My research has found that with “Rethink”, adolescents change their mind 93% of the time and decide not to post an offensive message. I was selected as Google Global Science Fair Finalists 2014 for my work on “ReThink”.”
  • I spent a weekend at Google talking with nerds about charity. I came away … worried. | Dylan Matthews on Vox (10 August): “Effective altruists think that past attempts to do good — by giving to charity, or working for nonprofits or government agencies — have been largely ineffective, in part because they’ve been driven too much by the desire to feel good and too little by the cold, hard data necessary to prove what actually does good. […] Effective altruism is […] a movement, and like any movement, it has begun to develop a culture, and a set of powerful stakeholders, and a certain range of worrying pathologies. At the moment, EA is very white, very male, and dominated by tech industry workers. […] Effective altruism is a useful framework for thinking through how to do good through one’s career, or through political advocacy, or through charitable giving. It is not a replacement for movements through which marginalized peoples seek their own liberation. If EA is to have any hope of getting more buy-in from women and people of color, it has to at least acknowledge that.”
  • We Still Let Harassers Participate In Our Community | Katie Kovalcin (12 August) [warning for sexual harassment]: “So, I reported an incident. I detailed someone who harassed me, provided receipts of the sexual harassment, and you want to then tell him I reported him and stick us in the same hotel? While effectively punishing me and not allowing me to participate in part of the conference because I was on the receiving end of harassment?”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

50 simple ways to spam the links (13 August 2015)

  •  More data on gender and literary prizes | Nicola Griffith at Goodreads (6 August): “[…] here are two new pie charts, following on from my previous post about what kind of book wins awards, this time on the most recent 15 years of the IMPAC Dublin Award and the Costa Novel Award. IMPAC CostaAs you can see, the IMPAC, one of the richest book prizes in the world, given for “excellence in world literature,” gives zero out of the last 15 prizes to stories by women about women—but 11 to stories by men about men.”
  • Uncomfortable conversations about money | Accidentally in Code (5 August): “When it comes to speaking at a conference which involves some travel costs, there are four main options: 1. The conference pays. 2. The company you work for pays. 3. You pay. 4. You don’t go.”
  • Why BioWare’s games inspire a unique kind of fandom | Sam Maggs at PCGamer (23 July): “the knowledge that we all feel the same passionately intense emotions for these lumps of pixels, no matter how well-written and complex they may be, gives us an instant connection—and isn’t that the best part of belonging to any fandom? We’re all in on the joke, all on the same level, and that’s what brings us together. But not all fan-created content is made completely in celebration of BioWare’s games; part of being a responsible and engaged fan is also writing constructive criticism of media we know could do better. And though not always perfect, BioWare is one of the few companies with a readily-accessible creative team that really takes note of and utilizes thoughtful, fan-written criticism. And being listened to is paramount to a fandom who dedicate so much time and emotional energy to these characters.”
  • Frances Oldham Kelsey, Who Saved U.S. Babies From Thalidomide, Dies at 101 | Robert McFadden at The New York Times (7 August): “[…] some data on the drug’s safety troubled Dr. Frances Oldham Kelsey, a former family doctor and teacher in South Dakota who had just taken the F.D.A. job in Washington, reviewing requests to license new drugs. She asked the manufacturer, the William S. Merrell Company of Cincinnati, for more information. […] Dr. Kelsey, who died on Friday at the age of 101, became a 20th-century American heroine for her role in the thalidomide case, celebrated not only for her vigilance, which spared the United States from widespread birth deformities, but also for giving rise to modern laws regulating pharmaceuticals.”
  • Lost in Transition: ‘Rat Queens Special #1: Braga’ | Charlotte Finn at Comics Alliance (6 August): “Hi, I’m Charlotte Finn. I’m a lifelong comics fan and last year, I admitted to myself that I was transgender. Coming out as transgender means reassessing a lot about your life, your place in the world, and what that world’s been telling you about yourself before you even realized who you really were. In this occasional series, I’m going to be applying that reassessment to comics that feature people like me, or close to being like me, and look them over with a fresh set of eyes. Are they good? Are they bad? Are they somehow both, at the same time? In this regular series, I’ll offer my thoughts.”
  • How to Ensure You Don’t Hire Anyone | Morgane Santos at Medium (7 August): “A while ago I was looking for a new job, and as such, I interviewed at hella companies, from Big Names™ to tiny start-ups no one’s ever heard of, looking for the ~perfect place to trade my labor for wages~. Throughout this process, I had some hilarious interactions with companies who clearly aren’t actually trying to hire anyone. Let’s examine some of their fumbles and mishaps, and learn how to really turn people off from ever joining your company!”
  • Play Your Way: Women and Magic the Gathering (part 1) (part 2) | Nicole Jekich at Across the Board Games (13 July): “in April there was some internet hubbub over recent articles written by male Magic the Gathering players and their advice on how to get more women into the hobby. I have no qualms with men looking to help diversify the MTG fan base and to make official events and tournaments more welcoming. I do feel that what these articles lacked is input and experiences from women gamers. I wanted to learn more about how other women enjoy MTG – to understand, through reading their experiences, preferences, and suggestions how we as a community could help make women feel more welcome and how to bring more women into the MTG game and community. So I created a survey for women participants who used to or currently play Magic the Gathering. I asked women to answer questions about their history with MtG, the hows and whys. The survey was shared via social media and within 2 weeks, I collected 97 responses.”
  • Call for submissions: Instar books finction Anthology #000001 Almost Void | Instar Books (15 June): “For fiction that involves some or all of the following qualities: Privileging imaginative transformation of experience over experience directly (i.e., not necessarily memoir by other means); Concerned with atypical subject matter; Concerned with atypical emotional states (trauma, isolation, Zen acceptance, etc.); Concerned with sex; Written by people who haven’t necessarily had access to traditional means of publication by the literary establishment; and/or Funny, yet about something terrible.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Say Hello To My Little Linkspam (8 August 2015)


We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The seven links of highly effective spammers (4 August 2015)

  • Erykah Badu and a new generation of activist artists focuses on self-care | Washington Post: “It would’ve been just as easy to compile a track list designed to keep protesters righteously and justifiably indignant. But Badu is exercising her instincts here, and they’re telling her that everyone fighting for freedom and justice in the streets, behind screens and at pianos need sounds meant to soothe, music that compels us to heal, and lyrics that remind us how imperative it is for love and inner peace to temper our rage.”
  • Code Studio rocks; diversity does, too | Catherine: pyOraGeek: “But if you partner with groups that already have connections in diverse communities – like the YWCA, which makes anti-racism one of its keystones – getting some fresh faces can be pretty easy! … Another benefit of Code Studio is that it’s entirely web-based, so you don’t need to restrict your demographics to ‘kids whose parents can afford to get them laptops’.”
  • Nóirín, go lonraí solas suthain orthu | Medium: Beautiful tribute to Nóirín Plunkett. “Nóirín delighted in discovering others’ superpowers. Nóirín delighted in finding our collective superpowers. They worked to help us design our communities to be more welcoming, to accept the contributions everyone had to offer no matter how small, to build the doors and to build the walls.”
  • Futurism Needs More Women | The Atlantic: “Why can’t people imagine a future without falling into the sexist past? Why does the road ahead keep leading us back to a place that looks like the Tomorrowland of the 1950s? Well, when it comes to Moneypenny, here’s a relevant datapoint: More than two thirds of Facebook employees are men. That’s a ratio reflected among another key group: futurists.”
  • It’s Weird How People Correct Me When They Think I’m a Woman | Houston Press : “What I found the most interesting about the negative responses I got from the article was how many of them assumed I was a woman and in that vein how many of them turned a special kind of condescending based on that assumption.”
  • The White House’s Alpha Geeks | Backchannel — Medium: “Smith and Macgillivray are taking advantage of the gov-tech moment to involve the White House in a number of projects, including the Police Data Initiative (compiling information from cooperating local departments on things like who gets detained, and what happens with bodycams) and TechHire (to open up technical jobs to a diverse population). Smith has been at the President’s side at a number of events familiar to Californians but previously rare on Pennsylvania Avenue, like meetups, tech fairs and demo days.”
  • On Wyatt Cenac, ‘Key & Peele,’ And Being The Only One In The Room | NPR codeswitch: : “The tricky thing here, of course, is the soft skill of “navigating the terrain of white people” often translates to not upsetting the apple cart, and yet upsetting the apple cart is exactly what advocates for diversity say they want. The tension between those two motivations eventually prompts so many of The Only Ones to throw up their hands and bounce, like Cenac did.”
  • Dissenting Opinions May Occur: Some Thoughts on Yesterday’s Troubling “Writing Women Friendly Comics” Panel | The Mary Sue: Amazing description of (originally all-male) panel on how to write comics for women readers. Panel moderator interrupted all the women speaking: “Claiming that success in the industry is merit-based and gender-irrelevant while simultaneously using your position as an established male creator to literally shout down women’s voices is willful ignorance. It isn’t eccentric; it isn’t cute, and it isn’t excused by the generation you’re from or the comic world you came up in. Unfortunately, it’s also not uncommon.”
  • Comic Book Women Will Save the World (From All-Male Comic Convention Panels)! | The Mary Sue: “Comic Book Women, an advocacy and networking group for women in the industry, began as a small group of peers and has now grown into a 200-member organization.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The Tendency of the Rate of Linkspam to Fall (1 August 2015)

Workplace Culture

Pop Culture

  • Why Do People Hate Fangirls? | Laci Green (July 17): “Confession: All the practice I got before my first kiss happened with a giant backstreet boys poster taped to the back of my door in 1999. And I regret nothing!” Laci Green explains what’s wrong with hating fangirls.
  • Black Girls Rock: A look at Fierce, Feminist Women in Film | The Mary Sue (July 27): “It’s not enough to be the token friend, or the one Halle Berry in a sea of Regina Kings, or the sassy comic relief like Leslie Jones’s brief appearance in Trainwreck. We are beautiful and unique, and we deserve to be heard. That’s why I put together a list of amazing women in film roles that showcase black women as more than just the limited caricatures we are constantly bombarded with in mainstream media. This is your friendly reminder that black girls rock.”
  • Waiting for Captain Marvel is getting old | Feministing (July 28): “When Marvel announced the Black Panther and Captain Marvel movies, I was among those cheering. Finally, a superhero film that centered a person of color and a woman. The reality, however, is that those films aren’t coming until 2018. In the meantime, we have to wait and watch films like Ant-Man invoke some sort of pseudo-feminist-women-are-badass-but-still-need-protecting message. Frankly, I may not make it until 2018.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The Lean Linkspam (28 July 2015)

  • TODO Group And Open Source Codes of Conduct | Model View Culture: “We’ve come up with some pretty great resources and tools, put them into practice, tested and iterated, and built community consensus. Yet TODO swoops in to erase and replace all of this work: without our consent or input, a group of massive companies with practically unlimited funds are branding and pushing a code of conduct that suits their needs, not ours.”
  • That time the Internet sent a SWAT team to my mom’s house | Boing Boing: “As the reporter recounted all of this to me, I was living my research in real time. I was well-versed in the mechanics of a prank like this, but that didn’t abate the anxiety attacks I was having.”
  • Managers beware of gender faultlines | EurekAlert! Science News: “In addition to gender divisions, the authors looked at a more benign kind of faultline: Those created by cliques centered on job types (that is, when people with similar job duties share not only that trait but other demographic qualities such as gender, age and time served.) When the diversity environment was positive, that kind of group identity actually led to stronger feelings of loyalty toward the firm. But the positive effect of job-function cliques disappeared when the diversity climate was unsatisfactory.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Et tu, linkspam? (24 July 2015)

  • 25 Ways To Dress Like A Tech Employee | Buzzfeed: “There’s a persistent stereotype that people who work with technology are all dudes in hoodies or free company t-shirts, with zero interest in personal style or fashion. We see it in everything from Microsoft ad campaigns to the way tech companies are shown in television and movies. In my experience, I’ve worked with many people who are just as interested in style as they are technology. So I decided to ask my coworkers on BuzzFeed’s tech team to show me how to dress like a tech employee, and this is what happened…”
  • The kick-ass women of ‘Sense8′ make it best new show on TV | Reel Girl: “Last night, after my husband and I finished watching the last episode of ‘Sense 8,’ I rushed to the computer, Googling the show to see when to expect season 2. Maybe never! Wait, what? According to Think Progress and other sources, the diverse show featuring eight characters from different countries around the world may not be appealing enough to white males. Main characters also include a trans woman and a gay man.”
  • This Ruling Could Change Online “Free Speech” Forever | The Daily Beast: [CW: online harassment] “The spirit of “free speech” is put above freedom from harassment, bullying, or shaming. And it’s having horrific results—leaving jobs, avoiding careers, even contemplating suicide. The response from abusers and apologists is to “grow a thicker skin.” That “this is the Internet.” But it’s not. It’s the Internet as abusers want it. We should change that.”
  • The World’s Most Popular Video Game Fights Racist Harassment With Artificial Intelligence | Tech.mic: “They built a system called the Tribunal, a public case log of files where players could review reported instances of racism, sexism and homophobia, then vote on whether or not they warranted action. After 100 million votes were cast, the team had a usable database of what their community considers an abusive behavior. Then, they turned over that knowledge to their machine-learning algorithm and set it to work dealing with instances of abuse.”
  • At Comic-Con, It Feels Like the Year of the Woman | NYTimes.com: “Quite a few panels reflected this variety and grappled with its implications. Nobody is suggesting that a utopian age of sexual and racial equality has dawned in San Diego or anywhere else. The default Comic-Con panelist is still a white man, but it does seem that more of an effort has been made to correct this lazy lopsidedness here than in, say, the Hollywood studios a few hours up the freeway. If the entertainment business is still dominated by interlocking old-boy networks — in the movie studios, the bigger comic-book publishers, the television networks and among the writers, artists and directors those entities employ — the audience is challenging that status quo.”
  • The Women Who Rule Pluto | The Atlantic: “For all the firsts coming out of the New Horizons mission—color footage of Pluto, photos of all five of its moons, and flowing datastreams about Pluto’s composition and atmosphere—there’s one milestone worth noting on Earth: This may be the mission with the most women in NASA history.”
  • Listening, Being Heard | E. Catherine Tobler: “Writers like Weir — male, white, on top of the NYT Bestseller lists, movie deals, a break out book — are in an amazing position to boost voices that are not like their own. They have the ability to lift others up. And time after time, they mention work that is exactly like their own. Authors who mirror their own selves”
  • The trouble with jokes about girls | Times Higher Education: “There are many aspects to this story, but I want here to focus on just one of them: whether construing a sexist comment as a joke changes how we evaluate it. I am not so much concerned with the specifics of this case but rather by a more general issue: the division between those, like me, who think that the “joke” status of a disparaging comment is irrelevant, and those who think that whether someone is joking or not is a game-changer.”
  • ‘A national hero’: psychologist who warned of torture collusion gets her due | Law | The Guardian: “Jean Maria Arrigo’s inbox is filling up with apologies. For a decade, colleagues of the 71-year-old psychologist ignored, derided and in some cases attacked Arrigo for sounding alarms that the American Psychological Association was implicated in US torture. But now that a devastating report has exposed deep APA complicity with brutal CIA and US military interrogations – and a smear campaign against Arrigo herself – her colleagues are expressing contrition.”
  • @EricaJoy’s salary transparency experiment at Google (with tweets) |_danilo · Storify: “The world didn’t end. Everything didn’t go up in flames because salaries got shared. But shit got better for some people.”
  • How to Deter Doxxing | Nieman Reports: “If I learned one thing from my ordeal it’s that doxxing can happen to anyone, at any time, for nearly any reason. But awareness of the risks—and effective strategies to mitigate them—too often come from bad experiences rather than preparation. When I was doxxed, the person who understood the most about what happened was the Domino’s delivery guy. As soon as Twitter was mentioned, he knew exactly what I was experiencing. Now it’s time for reporters and editors to know just as much.”
  • Read This Letter From Scientists Accusing Top Publisher Of Sexism | BuzzFeed News: “More than 600 scientists and their supporters have signed an open letter to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), criticizing four recent events that “hinder the advancement of underrepresented groups” in science, technology, engineering, and math. The letter asks AAAS to “work more diligently” to avoid “harmful stereotypes” when publishing content about minorities, and recommends that its editorial staff undergo diversity training.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Code release: Spam All the Links

This is a guest post by former Geek Feminism blogger Mary Gardiner. It originally appeared on puzzling.org.

The Geek Feminism blog’s Linkspam tradition started back in August 2009, in the very early days of the blog and by September it had occurred to us to take submissions through bookmarking services. From shortly after that point there were a sequence of scripts that pulled links out of RSS feeds. Last year, I began cleaning up my script and turning it into the one link-hoovering script to rule them all. It sucks links out of bookmarking sites, Twitter and WordPress sites and bundles them all up into an email that is sent to the linkspamming team there for curation, pre-formatted in HTML and with title and suggestion descriptions for each link. It even attempts to filter out links already posted in previous linkspams.

The Geek Feminism linkspammers aren’t the only link compilers in town, and it’s possible we’re not the only group who would find my script useful. I’ve therefore finished generalising it, and I’ve released it as Spam All the Links on Gitlab. It’s a Python 3 script that should run on most standard Python environments.

Spam All the Links

Spam All the Links is a command line script that fetches URL suggestions from
several sources and assembles them into one email. That email can in turn be
pasted into a blog entry or otherwise used to share the list of links.

Use case

Spam All the Links was written to assist in producing the Geek Feminism linkspam posts. It was developed to check WordPress comments, bookmarking websites such as Pinboard, and Twitter, for links tagged “geekfeminism”, assemble them into one email, and email them to an editor who could use the email as the basis for a blog post.

The script has been generalised to allow searches of RSS/Atom feeds, Twitter, and WordPress blog comments as specified by a configuration file.

Email output

The email output of the script has three components:

  1. a plain text email with the list of links
  2. a HTML email with the list of links
  3. an attachment with the HTML formatted links but no surrounding text so as to be easily copy and pasted

All three parts of the email can be templated with Jinja2.

Sources of links

Spam All the Links currently can be configured to check multiple sources of links, in these forms:

  1. RSS/Atom feeds, such as those produced by the bookmarking sites Pinboard or Diigo, where the link, title and description of the link can be derived from the equivalent fields in the RSS/Atom. (bookmarkfeed in the configuration file)
  2. RSS/Atom feeds where links can be found in the ‘body’ of a post (postfeed in the configuration file)
  3. Twitter searches (twitter in the configuration file)
  4. comments on WordPress blog entries (wpcommentsfeed in the configuration file)

More info, and the code, is available at the Spam All the Links repository at Gitlab. It is available under the MIT free software licence.