Tag Archives: Linkspam

Everything that linkspams must converge (13 June 2014)

Warning for discussion of sexual assault. Predatory behaviour and sexual assault at International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), and in ed-tech:

  • The original post at Medium, entitled “What is this, church camp?”, by Ariel Norling, is now deleted, Norling has since published Setting a Few Things Straight | Medium (June 5): “Both men’s actions were aggressive and symptomatic of larger systemic issues of sexism and rape culture. This topic has been too often avoided (because it is simply too intimidating for women to confess), ignored, and silenced. My sole objective was to bring attention to the fact that educational technology is a sector that still suffers from these issues, despite being comprised primarily of women.”
  • #YesAllWomen and Ed-Tech Conferences, or Why ISTE is Unsafe | Audrey Watters at Hack Education (June 4): “As I’ve explained on this blog before — or actually, in retrospect, maybe I’ve just hinted — I have received an incredible amount of misogynistic and violent feedback to my work in education technology.”

New movies! Reviews of Maleficent and X-Men: Days of Future Past abound! But it seems our spam submissions have a preference…

Spam!

  • Kim Moir of Releng of the Nerds recommends (June 9) Brianna Wu’s talk Nine ways to stop hurting and start helping women in tech (video, June 4) [no known transcript or subtitles, you can start subtitling at Amara to help make it accessible]
  • Online Harassment, Defamation, and Hateful Speech: A Primer of the Legal Landscape | Alice E. Marwick and Ross W. Miller at Fordham Center on Law and Information Policy: “This interdisciplinary project focused on online speech directed at women and seeks to provide a primer on (i) what legal remedies, if any, are available for victims of sexist, misogynist, or harassing online speech, and (ii) if such legal remedies and procedures exist, whether practical hurdles stand in the way of victims’ abilities to stop harassing or defamatory behavior… The study concluded that… there are few legal remedies for victims.”
  • How Perks Can Divide Us | Melissa Santos and Rafe Colburn at Model View Culture (June 9): “As managers, our goal should be to build the strongest and most effective teams possible. That starts with being able to draw from the broadest pool of candidates possible. When we exclude people because they don’t drink beer, can’t hang out after work, are remote employees or don’t like video games, we’re driving away people who could make our teams great for irrelevant reasons.”
  • Bigotry, Cognitive Dissonance, and Submission Guidelines | Charles Tan at Bibliophile Stalker (May 28): “On the very same day [N. K.] Jemisin made her [WisCon Guest of Honor] speech, a call for submissions for an anthology titled World Encounters went up… from the same editor who called Jemisin a [racial and gendered insult] and [gendered insult].”
  • Hospitality, Jerks, and What I Learned | Sumana Harihareswara at WikiConference USA (May 30) [transcript, video and audio are also available]: “When someone is criticized for doing something inhospitable, the first response needs to not be ‘Oh, but remember their edit count. Remember he’s done X or she’s done Y for this community.’ We need to start treating hospitality as a first class virtue, and see that it is the seed of everything else. Alberto Brandolini said ‘The amount of energy necessary to refute bullshit is an order of magnitude bigger than to produce it.’ It has a big cost when someone treats others badly.”
  • Black girls take on tech’s diversity woes | Contessa Gayles at CNN (June 10): “This past weekend, Black Girls CODE, a nonprofit that teaches coding to girls from underserved communities, hosted its first ever hackathon. “
  • The Newest Frontier | Lesli-Ann Lewis at Model View Culture (June 9): “There’s a persistent lie that there is a new industry of equality in the West. There’s a belief that in this industry, there are new playing fields, even ones, where ingenuity, inventiveness and good ole gumption result in success for anyone worthy. That industry is tech.”
  • Some thoughts on handling harassment and toxic behavior privately | Selena Deckelmann (June 9): “I believe in proportionate response. However, when the interactions are online and there is no physical public space, just ‘public media’, there’s a serious problem with the idea that a private response, particularly from the harassed, works at all.”
  • Lean Out: The Dangers for Women Who Negotiate | Maria Konnikova at The New Yorker (June 11): “Hannah Riley Bowles… has been studying gender effects on negotiation through laboratory studies, case studies, and extensive interviews with executives and employees in diverse fields. She’s repeatedly found evidence that our implicit gender perceptions mean that the advice that women stand up for themselves and assert their position strongly in negotiations may not have the intended effect. It may even backfire. “
  • How Not To Review Women’s Writing | Mallory Ortberg at The Toast (June 2): “I have gone back and forth several times over the last few days on whether or not it would be worth addressing Adam Plunkett’s New Yorker.com review of poet Patricia Lockwood’s latest book here… Also, if I am being perfectly honest, I didn’t want to seem mean by criticizing a man twice in public. I have since overcome this reluctance… It is such a perfect illustration of Joanna Russ’ How To Suppress Women’s Writing that I think it merits mentioning, if only as a cautionary example for all you future New Yorker (dot com) reviewers out there.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Safety requires avoiding unnecessary linkspam (10 June 2014)

  • Psychologists find that entitlement predicts sexism, in both men and women | Case Western University (June 4): “The researchers found that, for men, entitlement was associated with hostile views of women. Entitled men were more likely to endorse views of women as manipulative, deceptive, and untrustworthy—attitudes, which past research has shown are predictors of violence toward women.” (Original study is paywalled: Grubbs, Exline and Twenge, 2014. Psychological entitlement and ambivalent sexism: understanding the role of entitlement in predicting two forms of sexism, Sex Roles, 70(5-6):209-220, doi:10.1007/s11199-014-0360-1)
  • The Fanciest Genderqueer You’ll Ever Meet | H. Kapp-Klote at The Toast (June 5): “This is part of a narrative of queerness as linked exclusively to oppression. The popular narrative of both sexual and gender nonconformity is based on norms of rigid, compulsive sacrifice: ‘born this way,’ ‘I can’t change,’ or ‘trapped in the closet.’ Even as we celebrate gender and sexual diversity, we demand proof that deviation is compulsive, uncontrollable, and that one has suffered innumerable tribulations as consequence.”
  • Changing the Face of Women in Anime: The Importance of Ugliness | Morgana Santilli at The Mary Sue (June 6): “I am grateful for the beautiful women in media who are strong and smart and complex but I am also grateful for female characters who don’t need beauty to have strength and smarts and complexity. There are many things more important than beauty, and Senritsu is one example of paving the way toward real diversity in the representation of women in media.”
  • On Self Care and Why I Limit the Time I Spend With Dominant Culture Groups | Kronda Adair at Life as I Know It (June 6): “I really don’t care if the other person ends up liking me, joining my cause, or if their feelings are hurt because they said something they shouldn’t have and got called out. I have zero room in my person circle for white people who think ‘reverse racism’ is a thing, for men who think ‘reverse sexism’ is a thing or anyone else who hasn’t gotten past the 101 level in issues of power and privilege. It’s too exhausting and harmful to my well being.”
  • On Fighting for Marginalized People in Tech | Julie Pagano (June 8): “Let’s get this out of the way first. There is no ONE TRUE WAY to fight for marginalized people in tech. This isn’t a religion. Nobody is in charge. There are no gods or prophets providing us with a golden path that will surely lead us all to a safe and better future for diversity in tech.”
  • Ice Ice Baby: Are Librarian Stereotypes Freezing Us out of Instruction? | Nicole Pagowsky and Erica DeFrain at In the Library with the Lead Pipe (June 3): The role of service provider being of a lower status ties in to the feminized profession of librarianship: “Why do librarians struggle so much with instruction?… In this article, we look at theories of impression formation, the historical feminization of librarianship, and suggestions for next steps that we should take in order to take charge of our image and our instruction.”
  • Yes, All Geek Men | Shawn Taylor at thenerdsofcolor (June 5): “It is about time that we geek/nerd men step up to and embody the promise SF presents to us. It is about time we stop only reading about fighting crime or defending others and start doing so.”
  • A History of Women in Animation: Mothers of a Medium | Carrie Tupper at The Mary Sue (June 4): “The lack of notable female animation professionals within history only reinforces this assumption that it is ‘boys club’ industry. As a result, the names of women who have moved the industry forward have faded. This is my attempt to bring them back into the spotlight.”
  • 10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn | Soraya Chemaly at Role Reboot (May 5): “Men interrupt women, speak over them, and discount their contributions to a discussion with surprising regularity. Here’s how women should respond.”
  • Loud Bossy Feminists | Amy Stephen (May 23): “I can see, now, that I suffered badly from the ‘Fuck you, I got mine.’ attitude, so I’m leaving it here today. It should be easier for women and other underrepresented populations in our field. There should be more of us in leadership positions in our open source projects. It should not be unusual to see a woman as a developer on a big community based open source projects. And trust me when I tell you, being patient and nice doesn’t work.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Cold the Wind doth Blow (or The Unquiet Linkspam) (6 June 2014)

Announcements etc:

  • Peep Game Comix: “Attention All African American comic book creators and publishers, we are looking for original titles to add to Peep Game Comix. We are looking for current projects and even back catalogs of books.”

Several submissions on the “hurricanes with female names” thing:

  • The study is Jung, Shavitt, Viswanathana & Hilbed. 2014. Female hurricanes are deadlier than male hurricanes. PNAS http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1402786111.
  • Hurricanes with women’s names more deadly: study | Joan Cary at Chicago Tribune (June 2): “According to a recent study by University of Illinois researchers, hurricanes with women’s names are likely to cause significantly more deaths than those with masculine names — not because the feminine-named storms are stronger, but because they are perceived as less threatening and so people are less prepared.”
  • Why Have Female Hurricanes Killed More People Than Male Ones? | Ed Yong at National Geographic (June 2): “Jung team thinks that the effect he found is due to unfortunate stereotypes that link men with strength and aggression, and women with warmth and passivity… But Jeff Lazo from the National Centre for Atmospheric Research disagrees. He’s a social scientist and economist who has looked into the public communication of hurricane risk, and he thinks the pattern is most likely a statistical fluke, which arose because of the ways in which the team analysed their data.” (Study authors respond at comment #7.)
  • Do Female-Named Hurricanes Need To Lean In? | Beth Novey at NPR (June 3): “We’re also worried about what this trend means for the career advancement of female storms. We’ve seen this before. We know where this is going. So to get ahead of the curve, we’d like to offer some advice to all the girls out there hoping to become fearsome natural disasters when they grow up.”

Everything else!

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

O brave new world that has such linkspam in it (3 June 2014)

  • The Media Lab “Make the Breast Pump Not Suck” Hackathon | Medium: “The goals for the hackathon were to educate ourselves and our colleagues about the mechanics of breast pumping, discuss design challenges posed by current technologies and societal norms, and generate ideas for how we could change our machines and our society to make breastfeeding and breast pumping a normal, painless, and not-degrading experience for moms. We want to bring the breast pump out of the lactation closet, so to speak. Our larger goal is to help fuel a culture of innovation in the space of maternal and neonatal health, a space that typically lags behind other fields in technological innovation.”
  • We Have Work to Do: #yesallwomen and the Web | An A List Apart Blog Post: “So we, the staff of A List Apart, are putting a stake in the ground: we will be part of this conversation, too. Sexism and discrimination and diversity are not fringe issues—not problems that should be relegated only to niche sites or individuals’ blogs. They’re mainstream issues that have found far too comfortable a home in our industry. An industry we’ve worked too damn hard to grow, guide, and collaborate with to watch it falter and flail now.”
  • Reframing the Trigger Warnings Debate – satifice: “The reason why I’m highlighting the accommodation/disability aspect of this is because it is the important and salient point being lost in the panic about academic freedom. Academic freedom isn’t a human right. However, accommodations for disability are a human right. What you say, when you say academic freedom matters more than disability accommodations, is that your privilege matters more than someone else’s human rights. In so doing, you really are the embodiment of institutional oppression. Because this is the message that society at large tells disabled people.”
  • GenCon’s GoH are “diverse as the industry itself”? NOT GOOD ENOUGH. | Go Make Me a Sandwich: “We are here, women and gamers of color and queer people and non-binary people. WE ARE HERE. And we deserve to be reflected. IT’S TIME TO STOP ERASING US.”
  • These Tween Girls Created An Android App For The Blind | TechCrunch: “A group of six grade school girls in Los Fresnos, Texas took it upon themselves to solve a problem for blind kids. They built an app for them. The app, Hello Navi, first came from the imagination of a particular girl in the group, Grecia Cano. She says her heart went out to the blind students in her school who had a hard time figuring out how to get around.”
  • kankedort: long hidden dialect roundup: “It’s not all a fun conversation; some of it’s been difficult. But to me it’s still really exciting, because people are writing about their experiences transferring spoken words into writing. Writers who do this in their fiction are blogging about it for the first time. Personal writing histories are coming out, tentatively and with pain, because language is so closely tied to identity. Identity has language (whether that language is verbal or not) the way skin has nerves. Language is how identity interacts with the world and, in a weird way, how it feels. That’s why a negative comment about someone’s language hurts so much, especially if their identity is already bruised.”
  • My mistake of silence | Star Stryder: [TW: Sexual assault, harassment] “My mistake was being silent and pretending nothing ever happened. My mistake is not earning enough money to not be afraid of going head-to-head with a famous person who I know can afford lawyers. To every woman who has spoken to me since then … I’m sorry.”
  • Notes From A Queer Engineer: Can Inanimate Objects Be Sexist? | Autostraddle: “Cisgender men dominate the field of engineering, and they also hold most control over who receives funding and how said funds will be allocated. Is it any surprise that this system produces results prioritizing the wants and needs of cisgender men? Even so, does the fact that the logic is somewhat understandable make it okay? Does the fact that male privilege is ubiquitous also mean that it is right?”
  • Your next conference should have real-time captioning | composition.al: “We’re so glad we did this. If you’re a conference organizer, your next conference should have real-time transcription. It’s a small investment that will make your conference better for everyone.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

GF classifieds: become a linkspammer to the stars!

Hi everyone,

For two years linkspam have been emerging from our anonymous Linkspamming team like clockwork. But a few are on hiatus right now and it’s again time to refresh the roster. We’d love to bring a few more linkspammers on board.

If you’re interested, read on.

What a Linkspammer does

A Linkspammer gathers together links submitted by readers (and optionally links they found themselves) and puts them on our blog in a linkspam post.

How the process works:

  1. when you join the linkspamming team, you are subscribed to an email list where suggestions are sent and where you and other linkspammers can discuss things when needed
  2. you sign up in advance to do linkspams in a schedule we maintain in Google Docs. Right now, you sign up to do either two Tuesdays or two Fridays in a row (eg, you might sign up to do Tues June 3 and Tue June 10), but this varies depending on how many spammers we have
  3. in the 24 hours before your scheduled post, an email arrives which has gathered together link suggestions from comments here, from the bookmarking sites, and from Twitter
  4. you paste that email into a WordPress post and start editing it, eliminating less good links entirely, and improving summaries, adding trigger warnings and such for the remaining links. You might optionally add links you’ve found yourself or sourced from somewhere else, but this isn’t needed.
  5. you make the post live.

Most of the work of the linkspammer is now at step 4, where you exercise editorial judgement in including and order links and making sure all links have a representative quote or summary.

A Linkspammer needs:

  • to identify as a geek feminist or a geek feminist ally, and to generally like this blog
  • to be able to read and compose English similar to that in existing linkspams
  • ability to at least skim through links and summarise their content in a sentence or two, and warn for common triggers
  • familiarity with the WordPress posting interface (you don’t need to have adminned a WordPress blog, but you should have posted to one before, or otherwise have reasonable previous exposure to blog posting)
  • familiarity with simple HTML: lists, links and emphasis markup (the strong and em tags)
  • some editorial judgement: being able to decide if a link is worth sharing or not, and to select 6-12 links for the spam
  • able to plan a few weeks in advance and commit to producing linkspams when you said you would (with reasonable allowances for unplanned things, of course, we all have other things going on!)
  • ability to keep an eye on all the linkspams, just so that yours has new links in it
  • ability to put up with occasional public criticism, and apologise if you agree you made a mistake: sometimes our readers criticise linkspams, although not very often, and unless they violate the comments policy we will generally let the criticisms remain publicly visible.
  • willingness to read a moderate amount of email, as you’ll be part of discussions between Geek Feminism bloggers, and while our normal volume is 0–10 emails a week, in busy weeks it could rise to up to 40.
  • willingness to use Google Docs for scheduling and documentation

We’d like it if the Linkspammer(s) could commit to at least six months as a spammer, and can give at least a couple of weeks notice if they need to move on, so that their replacement can be found and work handed over.

The time commitment is around about one to two hours every time you sign up to do a linkspam post, perhaps a bit longer your first couple of times. You’ll do around two posts in every four to six weeks.

Please note: we cannot pay Linkspammers (or any other contributor), you will be working as an unpaid volunteer.

How to join us

Let us know in comments if you’re interested in helping out as a Linkspammer: make sure to leave an email address in the email address field.

Privacy note: because WordPress.com doesn’t allow a single post to have moderated comments, comments may be briefly made public if you’ve commented here before. We will make your volunteering offer private as soon as we can. Emails left in the email address box will not be publicly visible at any time.

We don’t need a whole resume, but a sentence about your previous involvement in geek feminism would be good, eg “I’ve been commenting here for months” or “I write about geek feminism stuff sometimes on my blog” or etc.

I just want to contribute links, not do entire linkspam posts!

We welcome your help! You can contribute links without having access to the blog or needing to tell us you’re interested. The best way to do this is to sign up for a Pinboard account and begin saving links there tagged “geekfeminism“.

If that doesn’t work for you, our automated link-gathering system now also checks the “geekfeminism” tag on the competing bookmarking sites Delicious and Diigo; the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter; and comments on existing linkspam posts. If it works better for you, make suggestions through any of those, they’re just slightly less well-tested than our Pinboard support.

She who controls linkspam controls the universe (30 May 2014)

  • Esther Dyson: Breaking through tech’s glass ceiling | BBC News (May 27): “Esther Dyson has been called “the most influential woman in all the computer world”. After fostering some of the biggest names in technology – and growing wealthy in the process – she is now trying to help people live better with a new health initiative.”
  • on claiming feminist identity (May 28): “but more fundamentally, i disagree with jean and scott that making feminism more acceptable for more people to claim is inherently a step forward. it’s similar to how i don’t believe that making a programming language gain popularity makes it a better programming language. yes, there is work to be done in dispelling myths and disseminating good information. but in the process of “selling” something you believe in, you become protective of it, and then suddenly defensive in the face of valid criticism. you also wind up needing to water down and compromise the ideals you’re selling until it’s palatable to the people who really fundamentally are not on your side. (in shanley’s words: “at last, a feminism the patriarchy can get behind!”)”
  • New STEM Education Initiative Inspires Girls To Earn Less Than Men In Scientific Career | The Onion (May 27): ““Today’s girls have the potential to become the physicists and chemists of tomorrow, powerlessly watching as their male counterparts are promoted over them, their intellects are ignored, and their research is underrepresented in scientific journals. Our mission is to let every young woman know that such a future isn’t a fantasy; it’s a reality they can most certainly achieve.””
  • #22667 replaced occurrences of master/slave terminology with leader/follower by fcurella · Pull Request #2692 · django/django (May 20): “The docs and some tests contain references to a master/slave db configuration. While this terminology has been used for a long time, those terms may carry racially charged meanings to users. This patch replaces all occurrences of master and slave with ‘leader’ and ‘follower’”
  • Sexual Predators: The Imagined and the Real | Psychology Today (May 5): “What makes our national obsession with sexual predation destructive is that it is used to justify systematically excluding young people from public life, both online and off.”
  • Twitter to Release All Tweets to Scientists: A Trove of Billions of Tweets Will Be a Research Boon and An Ethical Dilemma | Scientific American (June 1): “Until now, most interested scientists have been working with a limited number of tweets. Although a majority of tweets are public, if scientists want to freely search the lot, they do it through Twitter’s application programming interface, which currently scours only 1 percent of the archive. But that is about to change: in February the company announced that it will make all its tweets, dating back to 2006, freely available to researchers.”
  • The Whiteness of Apple | Random House Canada (May 27): “Like whiteness itself, Apple goes about becoming “normal” by never actually calling itself that, but insisting that it is nonetheless.”
  • Your Mother Calls Bullshit on Silicon Valley | AnnMaria’s Blog (May 29): “By focusing on a narrow demographic, products are made that don’t reflect the needs and interests of a large swath of the population, like mothers of school children, and teachers. Educational products made by people who have never been in a classroom often begin with the assumption that teachers are the problem and technology is the solution. Funding people over 30, and women, to make products THEY would want to use is a missed opportunity.”

She-Hulk

At the John August/ Craig Maison Scriptntoes live podcast last week, screenwriter David S. Goyer who is writing the first film that She-Hulk will appear in called her “a green porn star that only Hulk could fuck”.

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Linkspam special edition: #YesAllWomen (May 29 2014)

Warning: many of these links discuss misogyny and violence against women in general, some specific incidents of violence, particularly the Isla Vista killings. Graphic content will have additional warnings.

Due to our editorial process for linkspams, we’re sometimes not right on top of breaking news. Usually at least 12 and often 24 hours passes between the email that gathers up all the suggestions and emails the spam team doing its thing and the assigned spammer having time to check them all and post the linkspam, and that’s when there’s no holidays and such. Thus, yesterday’s spam didn’t include discussion of the Isla Vista killings and #YesAllWomen and other discussions. Welcome, sadly, to a special edition.

  • Warning: recounting of rape in geek culture. Your Princess Is in Another Castle: Misogyny, Entitlement, and Nerds | Arthur Chu at The Daily Beast (May 27): “[L]isten up, fellow self-pitying nerd boys—we are not the victims here. We are not the underdogs. We are not the ones who have our ownership over our bodies and our emotions stepped on constantly by other people’s entitlement. We’re not the ones where one out of six of us will have someone violently attempt to take control of our bodies in our lifetimes.”
  • [Isla Vista Killer] And Men Who Hate Women | The Belle Jar (May 24): “We have no evidence yet that he suffered from any kind of mental illness or was seeking any sort of treatment. Immediately claiming that with no proof to back that fact up leads to the further stigmatization of the mentally ill, and contributes to the (incorrect) assumption that mental illness equals violence, and vice versa. We don’t know whether [killer] was mentally ill. What we do know is that he was a Men’s Rights Activist, or MRA.”
  • Men’s Work by Paul Kivel | Lis at staranise (May 24): “I want to remind everyone to practice self-care and remember the people who are doing real good in the world. The more progress we make, the more individual events stand out. We actually live in a time of unprecedented safety and peace, whether you’re comparing us to 200 years ago or 20 years ago. Gendered violence specifically has gone down a lot in the last 20 years. There are reasons to be hopeful. It’s just easier to forget that because as the forest thins out, the trees loom so much bigger.”
  • A hashtag activism guide for men | Jess Zimmerman at The Daily Dot (May 26): “Women on Twitter were appalled and frightened by this virulent misogynist rhetoric, but we were not especially surprised, and then we were kind of appalled and frightened that we weren’t especially surprised. So we came together to share stories of the harassment, aggression, dismissal, and dehumanization that women—#YesAllWomen—face every day… And boy, did this piss off some dudes!”

While we’re here, we’re using a tool developed and perfected by women of color activists:

See also Suey Park’s Hashtags as Decolonial Projects with Radical Origins.

Hashtag credits: we believe that #YesAllWomen‘s creator has asked not to be credited at this time. Please let us know if this is incorrect. Readers will also want to read the #YesAllWhiteWomen tweets; we haven’t seen a definitive statement of the founder of #YesAllWhiteWomen, but it may be @JennMJack on May 26. If further credits are needed, we welcome corrections.

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs. If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Comment note: general discussion of misogyny and violence welcome, as well as specific responses to the Isla Vista killings and discussion in recent days. However, please do not name the Isla Vista killer in comments here. Remember Katherine Cooper, Veronika Weiss, Christopher Michael-Martinez, Cheng Yuan Hong, George Chen and Weihan Wang instead.

How soon is Linkspam? (28 May 2014)

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The linkspam instinct (24 May 2014)

Announcements etc:

  • Long Hidden, a Kickstarter-funded anthology of spec fic centering marginalised characters, is now available for purchase.
  • Registration for Solutions Summit 2014: Women in Science Writing (June 13–15 at MIT) is open.
  • Model View Culture’s Queer issue is out! Individual articles will be scattered over the spam over the next week, but check out the whole thing.
  • FOSS4G — a conference for open source geospatial software, to be held in Portland Oregon in September — is dedicating 50% of their travel grants funding for women and minority attendees. Applications close May 30. They’re also looking for donations to the travel fund; you can donate when you register for the event.

Gender diversity data and tech companies:

Spam!

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Not All Linkspams (20 May 2014)

Calls to action (writing/$)

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on PinboardDelicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.