Tag Archives: Linkspam

Damn, I Wish I Was Your Linkspam (22 March 2015)

  • Greg Pak Is Making Book Diversity Into A Reality | Black Girl Nerds (March 18): “with The Princess Who Saved Herself, I was initially attracted to the story because Jonathan’s song so beautifully explodes the passive princess myth and creates this amazing, non-stereotypical hero princess. I kind of imagined parents and caregivers reading this book to girls and boys alike, and those kids getting a kick out of it and imagining themselves as the proactive heroes of their own stories.”
  • Beyond Bossy or Brilliant: Gender Bias in Student Evaluations | The Society Pages (March 18): “Men are sexualized when they teach in fields culturally associated with “femininity” and women are sexualized when they teach in fields culturally associated with “masculinity.””
  • The Woman Speaker Slot | Accidentally in Code (March 11): “It is frankly amazing how many organisers think I will be willing to come and be a token women at their event for the sake of “exposure”. It is appalling how many of them think that I will cover my own travel costs to do so. It is particularly jarring when these organisers are large, profitable, tech companies.”
  • Making it easier to report threats to law enforcement | Twitter (March 17): “While we take threats of violence seriously and will suspend responsible accounts when appropriate, we strongly recommend contacting your local law enforcement if you’re concerned about your physical safety. We hope that providing you with a summary of your report will make that process easier for you.”
  • The Most Dangerous Meme in the Pao/Kleiner Trial: ‘Now, No One Will Hire Women’ | re/code (March 16): “No matter which side wins, what would be a positive outcome of this trial? If it were to help crack open a discourse that leads to more diversity, not less.”
  • Criticism and Ineffective Feedback | Kate Heddleston “Critical feedback is an aspect of engineering cultures (and work-​cultures, in general) that is damaging to both employee performance and diversity efforts. Critical feedback is bad for a myriad of reasons. First, people have strong, negative reactions to criticism regardless of their gender, race, or age. Additionally, people’s performance worsens when they are given critical feedback. They also end up resenting the person criticising them, even if the criticism is technically corre…, “Critical feedback is an aspect of engineering cultures (and work-​cultures, in general) that is damaging to both employee performance and diversity efforts. Critical feedback is bad for a myriad of reasons. First, people have strong, negative reactions to criticism regardless of their gender, race, or age. Additionally, people’s performance worsens when they are given critical feedback. They also end up resenting the person criticising them, even if the criticism is technically correct or kindly meant. Finally, criticism is disproportionately given to women and minorities during performance reviews, resulting in an uneven distribution of critical feedback in the workplace that harms diversity. “
  • This Democratic Congresswoman Wants the FBI to Take on Gamergate | Mother Jones (March 12): “On Tuesday Rep. Katherine Clark (D-Mass.), backed by the National Organization for Women and the Human Rights Campaign, asked her House colleagues to join her in demanding tighter enforcement of cyber-stalking and online harassment laws.”
  • The church of the hacker, or, fake geek girls and outside agitators | Tim’s journal (March 15): “To say, “It doesn’t have to be this way” is to expose yourself and your reputation and credibility to every kind of attack possible, because “it doesn’t have to be this way” are dangerous words. They inspire fear in those who find it more comfortable to believe that it does have to be this way, that all women should stay indoors at night (instead of men learning not to rape), that people who don’t like being verbally abused should “just grow a thicker skin” (instead of everyone learning not to be abusive), that children should patiently wait until they’re big enough to hurt smaller people (instead of parents respecting their children’s boundaries). What those using the “outside agitator” / “fake geek girl” defense wish for is making “it does have to be this way” a self-fulfilling prophecy by scaring everyone who can imagine a different reality into silence and submission. But as long as we recognize that, they won’t get their wish.”
  • How Our Small Startup Affords to Offer Paid Maternity Leave | Fast Company Magazine (March 18): “we mapped out a budget for how we would cover her time away, including an increased allowance for outsourcing some tasks to freelancers. We determined that we could comfortably provide her with seven weeks of fully paid maternity leave, plus several weeks of part-time work at her full salary before and after her leave.
    This exercise also confirmed our hunch that the cost of paying for Lee’s maternity leave was much more cost-effective than losing and trying to replace a vital employee.”
  • This App Makes Your Phone Buzz When You Approach Places Where Women Made History | Good Magazine (March 13): “Now, when app users log into Field Trip and switch on the history notifications, they are alerted when they are approaching the exact location where a woman made history at one point in time, and can then read a bit about her and her achievements.”
  • We are not colonists | Boing Boing (March 20): “When marginalized voices come to take their seat at the table, there will always be an outcry that they are invaders, colonists, inferior versions of their straight, white male counterparts. But rather than killing artforms, the addition of marginalized voices often helps ensure that they stay alive.”
  • Man Hands | Motherboard (March 17): “When a woman puts on a foot or a knee or an arm, she often finds that it’s not quite right. Knees are too tall and too stiff, feet don’t fit into shoes, hands are big, ankles don’t bend to accommodate heels. Every step a female amputee takes puts them face to face with the fact that prosthetics is still a male dominated industry.”

 

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Give Me A Linkspam, Ginger Ale On The Side (17 March 2015)

  • What Women Want in Women Characters | Muddy Colors: “For now, I’m going to give you a flood of examples of women characters in fantasy art — many infamous for being depictions unwelcoming to women — that have been redesigned by the professional artists in the Women in Fantasy Illustration group.”
  • How our Engineering Departments are Killing Diversity: Introduction | Kate Heddleston: “Women in tech are the canary in the coal mine. Normally when the canary in the coal mine starts dying you know the environment is toxic and you should get the hell out. Instead, the tech industry is looking at the canary, wondering why it can’t breathe, saying “Lean in, canary. Lean in!” When one canary dies they get a new one because getting more canaries is how you fix the lack of canaries, right? Except the problem is that there isn’t enough oxygen in the coal mine, not that there are too few canaries.”
  • ▶ Anita Sarkeesian: ‘What I Couldn’t Say’ (All About Women 2015) – YouTube: “What I couldn’t say is: ‘fuck you’.” Video of Anita Sarkeesian speaking at All About Women 2015. Warnings for recounting of death threats and harassment, and response to those.
  • ASU project combats online threats toward women, girls | ASU News: “The ASU project responds by creating an open, accessible set of tools for combating harassment. Additionally, the group will connect industry, policymakers, academics and community activists to facilitate communal response to abuse. The group will publish tools and tips in a digital format, and will host in-person and virtual events to produce and share the resources.”
  • After 25 Years at Dark Horse, Retiring Schutz Explains Why She’s Done Chasing Deadlines | Comic Book Resources: “Announcing her retirement in our exclusive interview, Schutz spoke with CBR about the decision and her career, from her comic shop beginnings to joining Dark Horse and helping grow the company into the publisher it is today. While there is much to be said, we’ll let Schutz explain it in her own words as we look back on her work, her decision to retire, and her hopes for Dark Horse and the industry as a whole.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

School’s Out For Linkspam (15 March 2015)

  • Every day, we read about another woman who has thrown in the towel. | Paul Cowan | Google+ (March 8): “I want to make one thing perfectly clear, especially to my fellow white straight cis-males: I’m not OK with this. Not by a very long way. As a manager, I want to make it quite clear that any team under my management will have zero tolerance for sexism, racism and transphobia, in whatever form they come. If I see it, I will call it out. If you want to do it, move elsewhere (ideally out of my company, or even better out of CS altogether).”
  • This Fake App Just Summed Up Everything That’s Wrong With Silicon Valley | Mother Jones (March 12): “WellDeserved is an app that helps you “monetize” your privilege—be it racial, gender-based, or socioeconomic—by sharing it (temporarily, of course) with other people. The fictional app was the winning entry at last month’s Comedy Hack Dayin San Francisco, where creative agency Cultivated Wit challenged contestants to come up with a comedic app idea and pitch it to judges, all in 48 hours.”
  • DIY Feminist Cybersecurity | Safe Hub Collective “We’ll walk through common areas of digital life such as web browsing, private data, and smartphones to show you different ways that you can implement as much or little security as you’re comfortable with. You have power to set boundaries and protections in your digital spaces as you see fit: we hope that this guide will help you to make informed, personal decisions on what is right for you.”
  • The Ladies of my Women in STEM Jewelry Series | Auberg Designs (March 5): “I started this line of jewelry to bring attention to some of history’s fascinating women of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) who often go unnoticed. As a huge history nerd, part of my motivation for this series was so I could have an excuse to read about these fascinating ladies. “
  • reddit CEO Ellen Pao: Harassment complaints fell on deaf ears at Kleiner Perkins | Ars Technica (March 9): [CW: Descriptions of harassment] “It’s the first opportunity that Pao has taken to elaborate on the gender discrimination claims she made in 2012. And the questioning started by going all the way back to the day Pao was hired at Kleiner Perkins.”
  • Why Ellen Pao’s Gender Discrimination Suit Matters | Motherboard (March 10): “But the fact that in 2015—after so much public outcry from women and people of color about harassment, discrimination, power and abuse—we still look to a court trial as the only yardstick to provide legitimacy to the lived experience of millions is downright shameful,” [Saadia Muzaffar, the founder of TechGirls Canada] said.
  • Kleiner Accuser Testifies on Sexism | Wall Street Journal (March 9): [paywall] “Ms. Pao also testified Monday she wasn’t offered a board seat at RPX Corp., which helps companies avoid patent litigation, because she was preparing to go on maternity leave. She said she was moved to a smaller, back office when she said she would be uncomfortable if Mr. Nazre took an office directly facing hers.”
  • Men (Still) Explain Technology to Me: Gender and Education Technology | Hack Education (March 11): ‘What we can do to make sure that when we say “your assignment involves the Internet” that we haven’t triggered half the class with fears of abuse, harassment, exposure, rape, death?’
  • Gender Avenger Wants You to Report All-Male SXSW Panels With Its Simple App | GOOD (March 13): “If you’re headed to SXSW and armed with a badge, make sure to take notes on the genders of the panelists you encounter, because it could make a difference. The female representation advocates at Gender Avenger are inviting all festival goers to report the female-to -male ratio of panelists using their Gender Tally app. The goal is to turn the data into sharable and embeddable charts, the charts into conversation, the conversation into action and the action into progress.”
  • Dear Marissa | Model View Culture (March 10): “With all of this data — presented both anecdotally and via rigorous research — how much longer can we explain away (or in your case, dismiss) the glaring institutional gender inequities that plague the tech field? What have you to say about race, physical ability, age, and a myriad other attributes that cause people to remain on the sidelines of tech? How much talent are you willing to overlook in an effort to hold on to your myths?”
  • Engineering: the first run experience | never a straight line (March 10): [CW for sexual harassment] “A new developer’s (especially a junior dev’s) first run experience within a job are the ones they’re going to remember for the years to come. The gravity of that responsibility should be treated with respect. Given that women in tech leave the field in droves, it’s clear that as a whole, the industry doesn’t give enough thought to the first impression that it has on developers entering the field.”
  • A Metaphor to Retire | Inside Higher Ed (March 3): “Many leaks in the pipeline continue using their technical skills in important ways. For instance, my team’s data science skills helped improve our partner’s warning system, doubling performance in some cases. Let’s abandon this inaccurate and pejorative metaphor. It unfairly stigmatizes women and perpetuates outdated assumptions.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Rule 34: if you can think of it, there’s linkspam of it (10 March 2015)

BONUS GAMING AND COMICS LINKSPAM


We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Wake me up before you linkspam (10 March 2015)


We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The five linkspam languages (6 March 2015)

  • Fat Chicks in SFF | Alis Franklin: “I don’t have any answers here, no uplifting mortal. Only anger, and a rallying cry. I want more fat women in genre fiction. I want fat women whose narratives don’t revolve around their being fat, and whose fatness is not used as a lazy shorthand for mothers or for monsters.”
  • how to write a sexist character without being sexist | We are book punks.: “You may have complex feelings about where sexism comes from and how it works.  Think about them.  Think about them some more. Writing on autopilot and then falling asleep at the wheel have real and painful consequences off the page.  It is your responsibility to stay the fuck awake.”
  • The Queen of Code | FiveThirtyEight: A short and lovely documentary of the great computing pioneer Grace Hopper
  • Why we offer childcare | Write/Speak/Code: “At Write/Speak/Code we know that if we really want to empower existing women engineers, we need to acknowledge the reality of our lives. The fact is that the time when women have the greatest opportunity for visibility and leadership, they are also most likely to be starting a family. Women (and marginalized groups in general) are more likely to be caregivers — for children or other adult family members. Ignoring these facts would directly contradict the mission of Write/Speak/Code – we cannot increase the visibility and leadership of woman software developers without accomodating the needs of mothers and caregivers.”
  • 2015 Leadership Awards Finalists | Women In Technology: Women in Technology Announces Finalists for 16th Annual Leadership Awards: “The awards program honors outstanding women working in the Greater Washington, D.C. region who have exemplified unique vision, leadership and profound success in the technology industry.”
  • Starting your own feminist backchannel | Valerie Aurora: “I’ve started or been part of many feminist backchannels in years past, and lately I’ve been surprised by being invited to several new feminist backchannels by people I don’t even know. I thought it was time for a step-by-step guide to starting and maintaining your own feminist backchannel, in the style of “Start your own b(r)and: Everything I know about starting collaborative, feminist publications” which I had fun co-writing with Amelia Greenhall.”
  • Remembering Octavia Butler & Examining Diversity in Science Fiction | The Marc Steiner Show: Podcast episode discussing diversity in science fiction; guests include “Ytasha L. Womack, author, filmmaker, and dancer, whose latest book is Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci Fi and Fantasy; adrienne maree brownco-editor of  Octavia’s Brood, sci-fi writer, and Emergent Strategy facilitator; K Tempest Bradford, speculative fiction writer, media critic, gadget head, and board member of the Carl Brandon Society, an organization dedicated to supporting and highlighting people of color in science fiction, fantasy, and horror media; and Jason T. Harrisauthor and editor of REDLINES: Baltimore 2028.”
  • Stuck in the Middle On Being Neither an Abused, Nor Ultra-elite, Woman in Tech | Medium: “From my perspective, what’s missing are the stories of women in tech who had a more varied path to the c-suite (or to whatever more senior role was their goal, understanding that goals can and do change) — those who haven’t had the editorial-friendly ultra-rapid rise to the top, who weren’t profiled in Wired, who didn’t have a book tour, and who can help bring others up behind them along the way. There’s nothing wrong or inauthentic about those who did have that experience, but it’s not reflective of those who started off as worker bees and continue to keep the hive humming.”
  • Inclusiveness Towards Non-Drinkers: FAQ (Google Doc): Lists ways to de-emphasize alcohol as primary purpose of team gatherings, and gives multiple reasons people might not be comfortable at drinking events.
  • Advice for women looking to get into game design: Part 1 | Go Make Me a Sandwich: “So I’m going to write a 2-part series here about getting started as a woman in indie publishing… Part 1 is going to handle what I’m calling “thinky stuff” – pros and cons of publishing your own content, as well as common cognitive pitfalls that women face in game publishing. Part 2 is going to deal in more practical matters. I’ll talk about my experiences as a self-publisher: how I got started, what goes into making a finished game, and the many different avenues available to self-publishers.”
  • This Month (And Every Month), Black Sci-Fi Writers Look To The Future | Code Switch : NPR: “But what’s happening now? There are more black writers of science fiction than there have ever been. Every year more of us debut to wider acclaim, find ourselves regularly on genre awards lists for the first time, and experience the pleasure of seeing more and more diverse faces at conventions. The black community has always embraced science fiction — the famous Dark Matter anthologies, edited by Sheree R. Thomas, included a work of speculative fiction from W.E.B. Du Bois. And now science fiction has, I think, finally been forced to recognize us.”
  • One Big Reason the Ellen Pao Case Matters | Nilofer Merchant | LinkedIn: “As the trial continues, the question is whether Silicon Valley and the tech industry as a whole will get a much-needed wake up call to acknowledge sexism exists. That’s why this case matters.”
  • Queer Quest 8: Trans characters in speculative fiction – GLBT News: “Sometimes, critiques of stereotypes and problematic representations can make creators hesitant to try to represent minority characters at all, but I’d argue that’s the exact opposite of the right response. The rarer it is to see a member of a given group in fiction, the greater the burden of representation is that falls on each individual character. Under those kinds of circumstances, the slightest imperfection can become seriously problematic. On the other hand, the more a group is represented in general, and the more a group is represented within a given work, the less of an issue it becomes if this character falls into slightly stereotypical behavior or if that one ends in tragic circumstances. It’s my firm belief that the way to address problematic representation is not necessarily with different representation so much as more representation.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Spam links. Ones you like. As many as you want. (3 March 2015)


We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

You’re The Linkspam That I Want (1 March 2015)

  • The Hand on the Knee: A Guide to Twitter DM Etiquette for Men | Amelia Greenhall (February 24): “The “Hand on the Knee” metaphor makes an important point: getting DMs from unknown men does feel… well, here’s how it feels for me: even though 1 in 10 of my unsolicited-DMs-from-men interactions feel ok, usually they feel gross, creepy or patronizing.”
  • Not a “Good Guy” | Anil Dash (February 24): “But I’m a regular guy, just like most of the people who read this site are regular folks. I am dedicated to improving the deep and pervasive sexism in our industry. I am also a man who doesn’t do his share of work around the house. I disproportionately foist the burden of childcare on to my wife, despite the fact that she is, in addition to the best person I’ve ever met, an actual Woman In Technology.”
  • There’s No Morality in Exercise: I’m a Fat Person and Made a Successful Fitness App | Matter | Medium (February 12): “the story I got told about what it meant to have a fat body, that it must mean that I sat around all day eating deep-fried stuffed-crust pizza and watching TV—that story just wasn’t true. The story about how people who look like me hate to exercise just isn’t true. It’s so easy to let the media you see or the discourse you hear define who you are before you’ve even learned about yourself. And I bought into it for too long.”
  • Revenge porn boss wants Google to remove his “identity related” info | Ars Technica (February 24): “What do you do if you’re a revenge porn site operator and the Federal Trade Commission has barred you from publishing nude images of people without their consent? You demand that Google remove from its search engine links to news accounts about the FTC’s action and other related stories, citing “unauthorized use of photos of me and other related information.””
  • How one lawyer is making a dent in the tech world’s gender imbalance | Fortune (February 24): “More people have expressed support than criticized or quietly protested. He’s noticed more women showing up to his events because they know they won’t be the only females in the room. He’s had event organizers reach out to him for suggestions of qualified women speakers. “
  • The Time Everyone “Corrected” the World’s Smartest Woman | Pricenomics (February 19): “The outcry was so tremendous that vos Savant was forced to devote three subsequent columns to explaining why her logic was correct. Even in the wake of her well-stated, clear responses, she continued to be berated. “I still think you’re wrong,” wrote one man, nearly a year later. “There is such a thing as female logic.””
  • I Spoke About Feminism to a Buncha Dudes at a Tech Conf & it Was Actually Pretty Good | Puppet Labs (February 11): “Being inclusive is tough, especially if you are trying to include people who are so used to being on the outside that they keep themselves there. For example, I’m offered the chance of a lifetime to fly to Barcelona to talk about feminism, and my response is to feel microscopic. Shouldn’t an opportunity like that make me feel big, or at least not-bad? And there’s the fact that I didn’t feel technical enough to give a talk about the work that I do every day, and I still don’t”
  • The Hidden Story of Harley Quinn and How She Became the Superhero World’s Most Successful Woman | Vulture (February 17): “”Feminism is about showing women as fully fleshed out human beings, and that’s what Harley is,” Strand said. “She doesn’t make choices that are smart or good for a woman, but she gets to make those choices. Men are allowed to be fuck-ups in all kinds of characters, and women aren’t. We have to be idealized. She gets to not be.””
  • Why the ‘Women in Tech’ Problem May Actually Be a Silicon Valley Problem | Inc (February 25): “But some new research from SmartAsset, which draws on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, shows that if you’re a woman working in tech, Silicon Valley really isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. For women, the hotbed of tech innovation is more likely to be New York, where the sheer of women working in tech is three times that of Silicon Valley. And while women face a substantial pay gap compared to men in Silicon Valley, there are two other major metro areas where women working in tech actually get paid more, on average, then their male colleagues.”
  • Institutional Barriers for Women of Color at Code Schools | Model View Culture (February 24): “Unfortunately, for many of the same reasons that WoC don’t make it into the interview rooms of tech companies, we often don’t make it into the interview rooms of these tuition-free or scholarship-providing code schools. We can trace this back to the pipeline problem, imposter syndrome, and the reality that many of us are caretakers who have people that rely on our time and our income.”
  • Silicon Valley Could Learn a Lot From Skater Culture. Just Not How to Be a Meritocracy | Wired (February 23): “If we’re going to talk about skate culture as a positive influence, we must take lessons from the good and the bad. Especially the bad. To ignore skate culture’s utter disrespect for women while celebrating it as cool and innovative is tacit acceptance of its sexism. We can do better. We must do better. We are better. And way deep down, I still hold out hope that skate culture might get better too.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Great links, less spamming (27 February 2015)

  •  You’re Excluding Stories By Straight, White, Cis Men? J’accuse! J’accuse! | K Tempest Bradford (February 22): “Reading only women for a year takes some thought and effort. And if you do that, people hardly ever assume that it happened Just Because or On Accident or because you were Just Reading The Best Books Regardless Of The Identity Of The Author. […] A reviewer who makes the choice to focus exclusively on marginalized voices is making a good choice. There are plenty of places for the privileged to get and gain attention. Making a space for everyone else is not bias, it’s a step towards balance.”
  • Teachers’ gender bias in maths affects girls later | Sue Wilson at The Conversation (February 25): “The researchers followed nearly 3000 students from 6th grade to the end of high school. As a measure of teacher bias, they compared school 6th grade test marks given by teachers who knew the students’ sex, with external test marks for the same students, but with no identifying characteristics provided. The researchers identified that a worrying number of teachers gave boys higher maths test results than girls of the same ability. They also studied the long-term effects of this bias. The study found that the effects of teacher bias (measured by giving lower marks in mathematics for the same standard of work as boys) persisted for girls, leading to poorer results through their high school years. However, many boys whose teachers over-assessed their performance in the early years went on to be successful in mathematics and science.”
  • JamForLeelah: Trans Positive Game Jam | Matthew Boucher and Kara Jayne (February 22): [warning for discussion of abuse and suicide] “JamForLeelah is a month long trans positive game jam to raise awareness on LGBTIQ issues, specifically trans youth issues and Leelah’s Law as well as an attempt to raise money for trans specific charities such as the Transgender Law Center, Camp Aranu’tiq, and the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. […] Leelah expressed an intense interest in not only gaming, but game development as well. She made this clear on both her Tumblr and Reddit accounts, so an indie game jam felt like a possible way to raise awareness for Leelah’s plea for social change, in a method she may not have only approved of, but also taken part in.”
  • The Future’s Been Here Since 1939: Female Fans, Cosplay, and Conventions | Uncanny Magazine (Jan/Feb): [warning for descriptions of violence] “Cosplay has been around since the very first science fiction fan conventions in the 1930s and before the word “cosplay” was invented. The first recorded cosplayers, Myrtle R. Jones and Forrest J. Ackerman, wore what they called “futuristicostume” during the first Worldcon in 1939.”
  • I tried tracking my period and it was even worse than I could have imagined | Maggie Delano at Medium (February 23): “yet another example of technology telling queer, unpartnered, infertile, and/or women uninterested in procreating that they aren’t even women. It’s telling women that the only women worth designing technology for are those women who are capable of conceiving and who are not only in a relationship, but in a sexual relationship, and in a sexual relationship with someone who can potentially get them pregnant. Read: straight, sexually active, partnered, cis women with enough money for a smartphone to run the app.”
  • Man Who Terrorized Brianna Wu For Months Says He Was Just Kiddin Around | Jezebel (February 24): [warning for discussion of threats and harassment] “The problem with Gamergate is you can’t satirize these people. I can’t stress this enough: the wider point here is the gamification of the harassment of women.” It’s already hard enough to get law enforcement to take threats against women online seriously. Wu worries that Rankowski’s hilarious joke will give police yet another excuse not to investigate violent threats online.”
  • The Harassment Game | Mikki Kendall at Model View Culture (February 23): [warning for discussion of threats and harassment] “And it dawned on me, there is no life after being harassed if you’re a marginalized person speaking up on the internet. Whether my harassment comes from talking about race in 2009, abortion in 2011, feminism in 2013, or some brand new topic in 2015, it’s clearly a part of my life. My choices are never speak, or be harassed for speaking. The topics really don’t matter. Because none of this is about ethics in game journalism, protecting the unborn, or defending feminism, comics, or science fiction from the perceived threat of people wanting them to be more inclusive.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

These links are made for spamming (22 February 2015)

  • DiversityMediocrityIllusion | Martin Fowler (January 13): “A common argument against pushing for greater diversity is that it will lower standards, raising the spectre of a diverse but mediocre group.” Martin Fowler explains why that’s nonsense.
  • On the Wadhwa Within, and Leaving | Medium (February): “That’s why I’m wary of the villainization of Vivek Wadhwa. For all that he is cartoonishly bad, going after him full force has the effect of drawing a bright line between Good People who see and crow over the error of Wadhwa’s ways and Bad People like Vivek. “
  • Q&A: Gillian Jacobs On Directing Her First Film And The Myth Of The Male Computer Geek | FiveThirtyEight (January 30): “This week, FiveThirtyEight launched its documentary film about Grace Hopper, a rear admiral in the U.S. Navy and the driving force behind the first compiled programming language.”
  • Video Games’ Blackness Problem | Evan Narcisse on Kotaku (February 19): “I decided to email with several prominent black critics and game developers to start a conversation. What is the source of video gaming’s blackness problem? What is to be done? I enlisted games researcher and critic Austin Walker, Treachery in Beatdown City developer Shawn Alexander Allen, Joylancer developer TJ Thomas and SoulForm developer and Brooklyn Gamery co-founder Catt Small to talk about what we all thought.”
  • I Pretended to Be a Male Gamer to Avoid Harassment | Daily Life (December 11): “Things went along smoothly until I started playing at the top level of WoW (World of Warcraft). To participate, you have to join a ‘guild’ — a large group of people who can commit to playing for long sessions. Being allowed into a guild is like a job interview, and as part of that process (like proving I had access to voice chat) I had to reveal that I was a girl.”
  • “Lean the f*** away from me”: Jessica Williams, “impostor syndrome” and the many ways we serially doubt women | Salon.com (February 18): “After a week of intense speculation about who would be taking over “The Daily Show,” Jessica Williams addressed the rumors that she was (or at least should be) the heir apparent for host. In a series of tweets, Williams thanked people for the support, but said she wouldn’t be sitting behind the anchor desk any time soon. (…) A little while later, a writer for the Billfold responded to Williams’ announcement with a piece that claimed she was a “victim” of impostor syndrome, and that she needed to “lean in.” “
  • Feminist writers are so besieged by online abuse that some have begun to retire | The Washington Post (February 20): “Jessica Valenti is one of the most successful and visible feminists of her generation. As a columnist for the Guardian, her face regularly appears on the site’s front page. She has written five books, one of which was adapted into a documentary, since founding the blog Feministing.com. She gives speeches all over the country. And she tells me that, because of the nonstop harassment that feminist writers face online, if she could start over, she might prefer to be completely anonymous.”
  • Research suggests that the pipeline of science talent may leak for men and women at the same rate | Inside Higher Ed (February 18): “For years, experts on the academic and scientific workforce have talked about a “leaky pipeline” in which women with talent in science and technology fields are less likely than men to pursue doctorates and potentially become faculty members. A study published Tuesday in the journal Frontiers in Psychology says that the pipeline may no longer be leaking more women than men.”
  • Life Hacks for the Marginalized | Medium (February 16): “Being human is hard! It’s even harder when your humanity is brought into question on a daily basis. But don’t let that get you down! So you’re not white/straight/male/abled/cisgendered/thin/rich — that doesn’t mean your life is over! It just means it’s much, much, much, much, much, much harder.
    Luckily, we have some time-saving tips that can help! By “help,” we mean “mildly mitigate your problems.” To solve them completely, try building a time machine and either engineering a whole new history that gives your people more power, or fast-forwarding to a post-patriarchy utopia.”
  • Like it or not, Supanova, popular culture is political | The Drum (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) (February 18): “Online protesters have urged Supanova to reconsider Baldwin’s attendance given the inflammatory and offensive comments he regularly makes on social media, particularly about women, transgender people and gay people. But when the expo released a statement saying it would be proceeding as planned, it showed it didn’t care about creating a safe and inclusive environment for attendees.”
  • The War for the Soul of Geek Culture | moviepilot.com (February 16): “The irony is that while externally, geeks are being accepted as a whole, internally, the story is much different. There’s an ugly core of nastiness coming from a very vocal minority, and as geek culture continues to expand, they only grow louder. And while the nastier moments of that ugly minority are starting to be recognized and picked up by mainstream media, it’s still largely our problem. Simply put, there is a war being waged right now for the soul of geek culture. And it’s a hell of a lot uglier than you realize.”
  • Binary Coeds | BackStory with the American History Guys (February 6): “The idea [of] the male programmer may be a stereotype, but having a male-heavy workforce is a real issue for the industry. Companies see a big gender disparity when they look at their technical workforce, and many are asking themselves how to get more women into computer science. But when you look at the history of computer programming, the question actually looks a little different. It’s less about how to get women into computer science than about how to get women back into computing.”
  • How To Talk To Girls On Twitter Without Coming Off Like A Creepy Rando | Adequate Man (February 17): “So, here you are, my friend, following a lot of brilliant women on Twitter (I hope). It’s so fun, and the best part of Twitter is connecting with people, so you want to reply to some of her great tweets with your own great opinions and jokes! Cool, cool, but here are some things to keep in mind.”
  • Art+Feminism Is Hosting Its Second Ever Wikipedia Edit-a-thon To Promote Gender Equality | The Mary Sue (February 18): ” In 2011, a survey conducted by the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10% of Wikipedia editors identified as female, to say nothing of recent clashes between editors in the Gamergate article that resulted in several women being banned from writing about gender at all. But just talking about the problem isn’t going to create more female editors—training women who are interested will.”
  • #ScienceWoman Special Project | Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls (February 16): “Amy Poehler’s Smart Girls is teaming up with the hit PBS Digital Studios science YouTube show It’s Okay To Be Smart to celebrate amazing women in science. We’ve got a special project planned for the beginning of March, but we can’t do it without YOU!”

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Thanks to everyone who suggested links.