Tag Archives: Linkspam

Where in the world is Linkspam Sandiego? (23 January 2015)

  • Hacker Mythologies and Mismanagement | Betsy Haibel at Model View Culture (20 January): “There’s nothing wrong with recognizing that some software engineers conform to nerd and/or hacker stereotypes. There’s also nothing wrong with recognizing that engineering is a discipline that requires concentration, or a creative profession in which work may sometimes come in difficult fits and starts. But the idea that engineering culture should map one-to-one to the existing and coherent nerd subculture is dangerous. Our myths about engineering become excuses for why someone is struggling. They discourage teamwork as a drag on productivity, rather than seeing it as a multiplier. They encourage coders to Other disfavored employees as “not real engineers,” creating clearly defined in- and out-groups. They encourage everyone to view coding ability as an innate orientation rather than as a trained capacity, which corrupts both hiring and professional development practices.”
  • Infamous | Mark Bernstein (15 January): [I found this site’s colours and text difficult to read, and it gave me a headache.] “GamerGate set out to writes its own story in Wikipedia – and to spread the dirt about the women who were its targets. These efforts were blocked by established editors under established Wikipedia policy. In retaliation, GamerGate planned an operation to get rid of its opponents – the “Five Horsemen” active in preserving objectivity and in keeping scurrilous sexual innuendo out of the encyclopedia.”
  • Gaming while black: Casual racism to cautious optimism | Jessica Conditt at joystiq (16 January): “”Gaming culture is a direct reflection of our society,” [Dr. Kishonna Gray] said. “The only reason racism and sexism run rampant in gaming is because racism and sexism run rampant in society. But in physical spaces, mostly, it’s not overt. It’s subtle. It’s covert. So, yes, these issues manifest in a similar manner in gaming, but I contend that they present themselves worse. It’s not subtle. It’s in-your-face racism. A black person may not be called a nigger to their face, but they can almost guarantee it will happen in virtuality.””
  • Male Allies Bingo Card | Karen Catlin, Cate Huston, Kathryn Rotondo (15 January): “As we look ahead to 2015, we’re hopeful that more men will show up as allies for women in the tech industry. That you will take a stand. That you will leverage your voices and your power to make real change to improve diversity. The tech industry desperately needs it. And here’s what we hope to hear from you.”
  • Call for Donations and Nominations to Wiscon Member Assistance Fund | Chris W at WisCon (2 December): “Every year, we try to help as many people as we can come to WisCon. It’s the time of year when we ask you to please consider contributing to the member assistance fund. […] All nominations need to be made by midnight, PST, February 15, 2015.”
  • C is Manly, Python is for “n00bs”: How False Stereotypes Turn Into Technical “Truths” | Jean Yang at Model View Culture (20 January): “Judgments about language use, despite being far from “objective” or “technical,” set up a hierarchy among programmers that systematically privileges certain groups. Software engineers sometimes deride statistical analysis languages like R or SAS as “not real programming.” R and SAS programmers, in turn, look down at spreadsheet developers. Software engineers also distinguish between front-end (client-facing) and back-end (server) code, perceiving writing server code to be more “real.””
  • Brutal Optimization | Rachel Shadoan at Storify (20 January): “When you have to wade through an ocean of horror to participate in our communities, what are our communities optimizing for? […] Let’s examine our ideals, FOSS folks. Do we want to be a community where you can only participate if you can survive the brutal terrorizing?”
  • The Elephant in the Keynote (LCA 2015) | Project Gus (19 January): “In all three of these questions I see a common thread – people (particularly younger people) not wanting to engage with kernel development or the Linux community in general. It’s not even necessarily a diversity issue – Matthew Garrett & Thomi Richards are both younger white men, demographics traditionally over-represented in open source ranks. I’m in that same demographic, and with a background in systems programming and writing hardware-level code I’d be naturally interested in learning to contribute to the kernel. The major detractor for me is the community’s demeanor. […] I don’t mean to play down the importance of diversity in open source. I think these issues are also extremely important and I think Thomi and Matthew do as well. It’s just that even if you leave the (traditionally polarising) issue of diversity completely aside, the answers we heard on Friday are still problematic. Considering the diversity angle just compounds the problem with additional layers of alienation. […] And while younger white male software developers are having their opinions panned by the respected older generation on stage, what does this mean for actual marginalised groups? If FOSS is ever going to achieve broad adoption, it has to appeal to more than a privileged few.”

 


 

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Linkspams on a plane (20 January 2015)

  • Gamergate Target Zoe Quinn Launches Anti-Harassment Support Network | Wired: “Co-founded by Quinn and fellow game developer Alex Lifschitz, the Crash Override network provides advice, resources, and support from survivors with personal experience to those facing harassment. The network, which officially launched Friday, also offers access to “experts in information security, whitehat hacking, PR, law enforcement, legal, threat monitoring and counseling.””
  • Beautiful Illustrations Empowering All Women Part 2 | GeekXGirls: “Artist Carol Rossetti created these beautiful reminders for all women, and now we’ve even got some geek specific ones relating to cosplay harassment and the “fake gamer girl” witchhunt.”
  • Belief that some fields require ‘brilliance’ may keep women out | Science/AAAS | News: “The authors suggest that faculty members and graduate student instructors convey their attitudes to undergraduates, who internalize them before making career decisions. Given the prevailing societal view that fewer women than men have special intellectual abilities, they speculate, female students may feel discouraged from pursuing advanced degrees in fields that consider brilliance crucial. Male students, on the other hand, will not experience this same feedback, leading to a gender disparity in the discipline.”
  • Representation of women and the genius myth | mathbabe: “If you think about it, it’s actually a pretty reasonable roadmap for how to attract a more diverse group of people to mathematics or other subjects. You just need to create an environment of learning that emphasizes practice over genius. Actively dispel the genius myth.”
  • On Tone Policing Linus Torvalds, or…| Many machines on Ix. : “What Linus undoubtedly sees as some sort of confident swagger in the way he writes, he comes across as acting like a child.  ”I care about the technology,” he told Ars Technica. But when he talks about other people’s work, the technical details are buried under a thick layer of lazy rhetorical flourishes that just Linus trying to show off… It’s the bluster of a bully, someone who can’t or won’t discuss a disagreement on equal terms, because he think he doesn’t have to.”
  • My boyfriend in Dragon Age: Inquisition broke my heart when he told me he was gay | Technology | The Guardian: “Consent is sexy. Consent is cool. Consent is a very important thing, for women and men, and now it’s in big blockbuster video games. Dragon Age: Inquisition is easily the most personal, well-designed relationship system I’ve ever seen – and if we learn anything at all from the media we consume, then our awkward, virtual sexual encounters in games like this could maybe shape us all into better, more respectful people.”
  • How crowdfunding helps haters profit from harassment | Boing Boing: [CW: misogynist speech highlighted in header image, harassment] “Crowdfunding services have the duty not only to be aware of who they are doing business with, but also to care when their rules are flaunted. If they don’t, ruining a woman’s life will remain gainful self-employment for these professional victimizers.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Every Little Thing She Does Is Linkspam (18 January 2015)

  • What Happened to All of the Women in Computer Science? | Pacific Standard (January 12): “having a personal computer as a kid was a strong predictor of choosing the major, and that parents were much more likely to buy a PC for their sons than they were for their daughters.”
  • On Sexism and Awards | Justine Larbalestier (January 13): “If you’re a man and you write a realist YA novel you’re more likely to win an award for it than a woman is.” YA fiction is more diverse in stories and authors than awards reveal.
  • An Old Fogey’s Analysis of a Teenager’s View on Social Media | The Message | Medium (January 12): “teens’ use of social media is significantly shaped by race and class, geography and cultural background.” “The fact that professionals prefer anecdotes from people like us over concerted efforts to understand a demographic as a whole is shameful. More importantly, it’s downright dangerous. It shapes what the tech industry builds and invests in, what gets promoted by journalists, and what gets legitimized by institutions of power. This is precisely why and how the tech industry is complicit in the increasing structural inequality that is plaguing our society.”
  • How to Edit Wikipedia: Lessons from a Female Contributor | Anita Borg Institute (January 13): “Beware editors who only want to talk about content; who feel that civility is not a problem on Wikipedia; who dismiss other editors or tell others to ignore problems; and who constantly derail discussions.”
  • And now, a guest performance by the Bogglemen | Rosemary For Remembrance (January 15): In reaction to the Anita Borg link above: “I am bitter and tired, I admit this, but I genuinely don’t see why women should invest their scarce time and resources in contributing to a public resource, no matter how valuable, that tolerates the behavior described.”
  • The ‘strong female character’ is dead. All hail the complicated woman. | The Washington Post (January 13): “What was best in film and television last year was the stripping away of the requirement that female characters have to be “strong” to be interesting or admirable.”
  • Agent Carter’s ‘Feminism’ Is More About Making Money Than Gender Equality | In These Times (January 13): “Given Marvel’s influence, yes, it’s good that Agent Carter has feminist ambitions, a strong female lead, even some understanding of women’s history. And that should be the standard for all Marvel movies, because, like it or not, they’re one of the most powerful cultural forces in the world. This is what the “representation” part of feminist analysis is good at demanding: If these entertainments are going to be ubiquitous, they had better not be harmful.
    But let us not confuse a corporation adjusting its marketing strategy with “feminism.” Let us not assume Marvel wishes to do anything but acquire a new revenue stream, and let us not, dear Lord, commit the sin of gratitude for the bare minimum.”
  • “It’s [Not] Okay”: How Women Die In Comic Book Movies | The Mary Sue (January 12): “Comic books and their adaptations, which we are thankfully getting a whole lot more of, can be a powerful tool in shaping our culture’s perception of women, and it’s time that script writers quit relying on the deaths of women to make their stories appear more interesting.”
  • YC Demographics | YCombinator (January 14): “Based on analyzing a random sample of 5% of YC winter 2015 applicants, 11.8% of the founders who applied were women and around 3% percent of the founders were either Black or Hispanic.
    Of the founders we funded in our most recent batch, 11.1% of the founders are women (about 23% of the startups have one or more female founders), 3.7% of the founders are Hispanic, and 4% of the founders are Black.”
  • Announcing AdaCamp Montreal: apply now to join us in Montreal in April! | Ada Initiative (January 14): “AdaCamp Montreal, our seventh AdaCamp, will be held in downtown Montreal, Quebec, Canada. on April 13th–14th, 2015, just after PyCon. The event will involve an unconference held over the two days, along with evening social events.” “Deadline for applications requesting travel assistance is Friday, February 13 2015; all other applications are due February 27th or earlier depending on demand. (we recommend you apply ASAP)”
  • Corporate social responsibility and open source volunteering | Growstuff (January 15): “Does your company have a corporate social responsibility (CSR) program? Do your staff volunteer on community projects as part of it? Do your software engineers or other technical staff offer their skills to community organisations or other good causes? If you run an open source project, especially one related to a social cause, have you ever invited companies to participate in your project as part of their CSR efforts? How do you make it easy for CSR volunteers to help out?…Here are some of my tips for successfully matching corporate volunteers with open source projects, and working productively together.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

What to expect when you’re linkspamming (16 January 2015)

  • The Top 10 (%) Tech Rules by Leslie Miley | Model View Culture: “This process is so biased it’s amazing it still exists. Every step along the way, exclusionary hurdles are introduced to limit the candidate pool. Sourcers are directed to specific companies and instructed to focus on certain schools. Recruiters are told by hiring managers that they prefer certain companies and schools over others. By the time candidates are in the on-site interview it’s clear they went to the right school, worked at the right companies and in the case of employee referrals, know the right people. They are shepherded through the process much like a child is taken to their first day at preschool.”
  • “Misogyny in the Valley”| Consulting Adult: “Women need space to be themselves at work. Until people who have created their success by worshipping at the temple of male behavior, like Sheryl Sandberg, learn to value alternate behaviors, the working world will remain a foreign and hostile culture to women. And if we do not continuously work to build corporate cultures where there is room for other behaviors, women will be cast from or abandoned in a world not of our making, where we continuously ‘just do not fit in,’ but where we still must go to earn our livings.”
  • Adam Grant and Sheryl Sandberg on Why Women Stay Quiet at Work | NYTimes.com: “Suspecting that powerful women stayed quiet because they feared a backlash, Professor Brescoll looked deeper. She asked professional men and women to evaluate the competence of chief executives who voiced their opinions more or less frequently. Male executives who spoke more often than their peers were rewarded with 10 percent higher ratings of competence. When female executives spoke more than their peers, both men and women punished them with 14 percent lower ratings. As this and other research shows, women who worry that talking “too much” will cause them to be disliked are not paranoid; they are often right.”
  • Preliminary Results From WIGI, The Wikipedia Gender Inequality Index | notconfusing: “WIGI is the Wikipedia Gender Inequality Index, a project whose purpose is to attempt to gain insight into the gender gap through understanding which humans are represented in Wikipedia. Professor Piotr Konieczny, and myself thought that, whereas some gender gap research focuses on the editors of Wikipedia directly, we would view the content and metadata of articles as a proxy measure for those editing.”
  • Quinnspiracy Blog – 2015: Zoe Quinn checks in at the start of 2015.
  • Stop Centering the Majority in Minority Space | Julie Pagano: “Underrepresented groups get so few spaces where they are the focus. Spaces where they get to see people like themselves on stage and learn from them. Spaces where people like them are prioritized. Seeing someone from the majority in a position of prominence in that space is demoralizing. It means that yet again the majority is given priority, even in a space that isn’t supposed to be about them. It’s especially a punch to the gut when someone you actually want to hear from is on the stage as a glorified prop — an interviewer to ask questions.”
  • She Makes Comics: A New Documentary Explores the History of Women in Comics | Bitch Magazine: “Marisa Stotter is the director of She Makes Comics, a self-described feminist and geek who moved to Los Angeles to work in the film industry in 2013. After She Makes Comics was released last month, we talked on the phone about her experience directing a film for the first time, her hope that more people begin to participate in comic culture, and the importance of celebrating women’s achievements in the comics scene. Watch the trailer below.”
  • Is ‘SimCity’ Homelessness a Bug or a Feature? | Motherboard: “For Bittanti, it’s impossible not to see the connections between the homeless problem in the Bay Area and the way it’s portrayed in SimCity. ‘That is, can we fix homelessness in SimCity, or because we haven’t fixed homelessness as a problem in real life, therefore we are bound to lose?’ Bittanti asked. ‘Is SimCity a reflection of what’s happening in reality, and therefore is very realistic, or is it a programming issue?'”
  • Dalhousie turns down formal faculty complaint against Facebook ‘Gentlemen’: [CW: rape; use of drugs to facilitate rape; medical abuse] Apparently, half the male students at the Dalhousie dental school made jokes on Facebook about raping sedated women. The university administration, unsurprisingly, isn’t handling it well.
  • “scott aaronson has dug himself into a bit of a hole”: “scott aaronson has dug himself into a bit of a hole, and it’s picking at scabs of mine, so i’m going to try to do a bit of a response from the perspective of a woman in STEM who has for a long time admired aaronson’s work… i haven’t yet seen a response from someone who a) is within STEM, who knows exactly what it’s like to have people like scott as colleagues and mentors, and b) has commented on the mental illness/neuro-atypicality aspect of things that scott describes as an affliction unique to male nerds.”
  • How People You’ve Never Heard of Got To Be the Most Powerful Users on Pinterest | Backchannel — Medium: “The story of how these (mostly) women won a jackpot they never entered is one that reveals how conference room strategizing in a social media startup’s early years can have lasting and meaningful consequences for its members’ lives. What might have been for Pinterest a temporary experiment — a way of recommending accounts to solve an onboarding headache or high bounce rate — has, for some Pinterest users, persisted for years as a source of income, bewildering attention and uncertainty.”
  • “To anthology editors”, a corollary | Epiphany 2.0: “Anthology editors, if you really don’t understand why reading a diverse range of authors for your anthology is a good idea, don’t try to fake it. Don’t try to do it anyway just to avoid controversy. Do some reading — starting with her essay — have difficult conversations with your friends, push the boundaries of your comfort zones, do whatever you have to do to get it. Then? Then we can talk.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

I spammed a link in Reno just to watch it die (13 January 2015)

  • Facing the Challenge of Online Harassment | Electronic Frontier Foundation (January 8): “This post explains our thinking about combating online harassment, and what we hope EFF’s role can be in that effort given the scope of our work.”
  • Accidental Ass-Kicker Hayley Atwell Talks Starring in Marvel’s First Female-Fronted Property | The Mary Sue (January 6): “In anticipation of tonight’s two-hour Agent Carter premiere, The Hollywood Reporter has released an in-depth interview in which Hayley Atwell talks Peggy’s evolution, fronting Marvel’s first female-led property, and as always, punching.”
  • To anthology editors | Nalo Hopkinson (January 5): “[S]uggestions for how editors can go about creating anthologies that contain a diversity of voices. Here they are.”
  • Men (on the Internet) don’t believe sexism is a problem in science, even when they see evidence | The Washington Post (January 6): “As a follow-up to recent studies on sexism and harassment in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), researchers studied the Internet’s reaction to the evidence those studies provided — and it turned out the way you’d expect, if you’ve ever been on the Internet.”
  • The plight of the bitter nerd: Why so many awkward, shy guys end up hating feminism | Salon (January 10): “No one actually said men have it easy. But men are the ones who by and large get to deal with this as an internal matter. Women are the ones who have to deal with internal hang-ups and, as Laurie Penny points out in her piece, external threats from other people. Guys deal with Women in the abstract, as a category; women deal with specific men who physically threaten them.”
  • Research about Gender in the STEM Workplace | Slow Searching (October 3, 2014): An excellent bibliography on gender in the STEM workplace.
  • “Code and Cupcakes” Teaches Moms and Daughters How to Code, Aims to Improve Diversity in Tech | The Mary Sue (January 8): “When Jen Myers first learned how to code over a decade ago, she was often the only woman in her computer science classes. Now a successful web designer, Myers is dedicating herself to making coding accessible to women of all ages–and she’s got cupcakes on her side!”

  •  

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    I Just Love Finding New Places To Wear Linkspam (9 January 2015)

    • The hard slog of diversity — Medium: “Even if you work in an organization that’s supportive, and which would love to make changes and celebrate them, dealing with these concerns is SO MUCH WORK. You can spend weeks trying to get a small measure in place. And if it didn’t work, did you waste your time? If your job at the company is not to fix this problem, do you get tired after your first idea? your third idea? How do you decide if an idea is even worth tackling, especially if it’s controversial?”
    • In STEM Courses, a Gender Gap in Online Class Discussions – Wired Campus – Blogs – The Chronicle of Higher Education: “Women and men behave differently in online class discussions, at least in science, engineering, and computer-science courses, according to a new study conducted by Piazza Technologies, a company that makes a digital class-participation tool. The company found that women use its program, called Piazza, to ask more questions than do their male peers, but that they answer fewer questions. When women do answer, they are more likely to answer anonymously.”
    • 31c3: inclusivity, bias and awareness – Zara Rahman: “Essentially, all of the observations that we’d been hearing about students’ access to technology, the differences between postgrads and undergrads, were all true for men only, not for any women at all. Call me picky, but for me at least, gender segregation in the university being discussed is a major fact that affects how I interpret most of the observations mentioned, and one I hope would be given more importance than being brought up by an audience member.”
    • Intel Budgets $300 Million for Diversity – NYTimes.com: “In addition, Intel said it has established a $300 million fund to be used in the next three years to improve the diversity of the company’s work force, attract more women and minorities to the technology field and make the industry more hospitable to them once they get there. The money will be used to fund engineering scholarships and to support historically black colleges and universities.”
    • What Happened When The New York Times Tried To Profile Marissa Mayer — Medium: “Sunday’s New York Times Magazine has a long profile of Marissa Mayer’s turnaround efforts at Yahoo called “What Happened When Marissa Mayer Tried to Be Steve Jobs.” And I’m furious. Because this is tech journalism at its sexist worst.”
    • ‘Agent Carter’ Star Reveals Wild Hopes for Decades of Stories to Come: “It’s a great time to be able to say to audiences and to Hollywood alike: Women are bankable. They want to be at the forefront. They are watchable, and audiences want them, and Hollywood should want to make female-centered projects. I feel like the last 10 years of TV has created really strong and fascinating women. Women who aren’t the damsel in distress or the ingenue or the bitch or the mother-in-law. They are a lot more interesting and complex. I hope that Peggy is seen in that category of leading a show, but also showing her flaws and showing much more relatable qualities.”
    • ‘Philosophy is for posh, white boys with trust funds’ – why are there so few women? | Higher Education Network | The Guardian: Interviews with female philosophers. “Although male and female students take philosophy undergraduate courses in almost equal numbers, the number of women who pursue a career in philosophy is much lower. A recent report by the Equality Challenge Unit found that, among non-Stem (science, technology, engineering and maths) subjects, philosophy is one of the most male-dominated, with men accounting for 71.2% of the profession.”

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    I’ll Linkspam What She’s Linkspamming (7 January 2015)

  • It’s Not an Asshole Problem—It’s a Bystander Problem | Accidentally in Code “I read Lean In and looked around at the women I knew, and I noticed how, for most of us, it “just so happened” that a guy was promoted over them. It “just so happened” that he was the tech/team lead, or the manager. It “just so happened” that we hadn’t been promoted before our projects were killed.”
  • Mediocrity and Unfair Expectations, or, Gender Bias in Judging Women | Medium (December 31): “I wish there were more mediocre women developers. When women are as mediocre as men, well, then we are in a post-sexist world.”
  • What leading feminists want to accomplish this year | The Washington Post (January 2): “From the creators of #BlackLivesMatter to a MacArthur genius fighting for women’s labor rights, we asked 16 of the year’s most influential voices for what they hope to accomplish in 2015.”
  • Fixing Broken Things | This View of Life (December 29): QA analyst’s analogy for social justice – it’s all about fixing things, but we’re still arguing about who’s to blame.
  • Pinterest Engineer Tracy Chou is Breaking the Silicon Ceiling | Vogue (November 21): “At only 27, Chou has emerged as a star problem-solver, a programmer who, having started out as an intern at Facebook and Google before taking on a foundational role at Quora, can now do with a line of code what a master brain surgeon can do with a rongeur. More recently, though, she’s led an effort to solve one of the tech industry’s most nagging problems: a striking dearth of women, especially within its engineering ranks.”
  •  


     

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    Segmentation fault, links spammed (4 Janurary 2015)

    • See How She Runs: Feminists Rethink Fitness | International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics (January): Submissions due 1st April, 2015. “Some of the issues discussed show that there are significant impediments to women’s flourishing associated with fitness talk: fat shaming, body image, the tyranny of dieting, the narrow aesthetic ideal of femininity and how antithetical it is to athleticism, the sexualization of female athletes, women and competition, issues about entitlement, inclusion, and exclusion, the way expectations about achievement are gender variable, the harms of stereotyping. Feminists have begun to interrogate the very assumptions about what constitutes “fitness” in the first place. How is fitness connected to ableism and non-disabled privilege? Sport and fitness provide us with microcosms of more general feminist concerns about power, privilege, entitlement, and socialization.”
    • Harassed by Algorithms | Joanne McNeil on Medium (31 December): “accidental algorithmic run-ins happen more frequently, often with startling insensitivity, and with greater potential for emotional distress. […] there is no way to amplify marginalized voices if structural inequality is reflected in our algorithms and reinforced in user pageviews”
    • 365 Days of Feminism | mariemeierwilderart (2 January): “The goal of 365 DAYS OF FEMINISM is to present a feminist figure per day during a year from all backgrounds and eras without distinction or ranking. The idea is to show how many women, have worked and are still working for the women rights worldwide and to arouse curiosity about them.”
    • Why Do You Fight Accessibility? | this ain’t livin (2 January): “when I see people being resistant to accessibility, I point out the benefits of universal design and the fact that modifications to an environment benefit everyone, not ‘just’ disabled people (though even if it’s a disability-specific modification, it’s still appropriate, worthy, and should be implemented). […] you have situations like city councillors signing off on plans for public buildings with no ramped access, because it doesn’t occur to them that some people in the community (including current and future city employees!) might use wheelchairs, walkers, canes, or other mobility aids that are hard to impossible to maneuver up stairs. You have web designers making pretty, pretty things that look gorgeous and are totally not functional because they’re focused entirely on a specific school of aesthetics, not on the execution and user side of things; they step back and are pleased with their work as an artistic creation, but don’t realise it’s a struggle for users (whether or not they have impairments that could interfere with their ability to navigate the site).”
    • Sacagawea (c. 1788-1812) | Awesome Ladies of History (2 January): “Putting some of the most badass women of history in the spotlight. […] Sacagawea was a Lemhi Shoshone woman who was part of the Lewis and Clark Expedition as a guide and interpreter, traveling from North Dakota all the way to the Pacific Ocean between 1804 and 1806.”
    • ‘We Are the Future ****': CyberFeminism in the 90s | Motherboard (20 November): Part 1 of Motherboard’s CyberFeminism series. Part 2 is here. “CyberFeminism: A wave of thought, criticism, and art that emerged in the early 1990s, galvanizing a generation of feminists, before bursting along with the dot-com bubble.”

     

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    Guardians of the Linkspam

    • A Brand New World In Which Men Ruled | New York Times (December 23rd): “Yet instead of narrowing gender gaps, the technology industry created vast new ones, according to interviews with dozens of members of the class and a broad array of Silicon Valley and Stanford figures. “We were sitting on an oil boom, and the fact is that the women played a support role instead of walking away with billion-dollar businesses,” said Kamy Wicoff, who founded a website for female writers.”
    • On Nerd Entitlement | New Statemen (December 29th): “White male nerds need to recognise that other people had traumatic upbringings, too – and that’s different from structural oppression.”
    • Brief Critique of Paul Graham’s Essay “Let the Other 95% of Great Programmers In” | Shanley on Storify (December 27): “You look at underrepresentation and say this is explained by “inherent skills” = genetic/biological justification for racism and sexism.”
    • Why 2014 was actually a positive year for women in tech | The Kernel (December 21st): “At first glance, it’s just another year full of a number of very high-profile events highlighting how toxic the tech industry can be towards women. But look again: 2014 was actually a great year. Not because of the things that happened, but because women are finally talking about their experiences. Perhaps more importantly, people are listening.”
    • Hello, Quotas: The 2015 Diversity Imperative | Medium (December 19th): “Ergo, quotas. Not out of generosity or an earnest commitment to changing the ratio — please, nothing hates change more than the status quo — but out of urgency. Organizations are realizing that actual diversity results takes effort and commitment, and can’t be waved away with an obligatory seminar and vague promises to do better. It comes down to making it a priority.”
    • An illustrated guide to superhero movies that pass the Bechdel Test | The Daily Dot (December 30th): “For films like Spider-Man, Batman, and The Avengers, all of which have extensive supporting casts, there’s really no excuse for having so few women in speaking roles.”
    • Concern for Equality Linked to Logic, not Emotion | Sociological Images (December 26th): “A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person. Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.”
    • Meet the most famous woman in computing you’ve probably never heard of | PRI (December 23rd): “Famous computer scientist Alan Turing was the first person in the modern computer age to reference Lovelace in his own writings. She was later hailed as the world’s first programmer and a visionary who saw the potential of modern computers 100 years before they were built. In 1980, the US Defense Department named a programming language after her.  And then in the mid-80s, the backlash started, says computer scientist Valerie Aurora.”

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

    I’ve Got a Bad Feeling About Linkspam (28 December 2014)

    • Diversity != Inclusion: Expanding the “diversity in tech” conversation | Tiffany Mikell at Medium (26 December): “Diversity in tech conversations have become stagnant and narrow. Missing in these conversations is the relevance of culturally specific learning, methods of curating inclusive work spaces, practical ways to navigate the psychological toll of being an under-represented person, and attention to the value of supporting economic ecosystems that financially and structurally support POC communities.”
    • Why You Have To Fix Governance To Improve Hospitality | Cogito, Ergo Sumana (21 December): “if you want a hospitable community, it’s not enough to set up a code of conduct; a CoC can’t substitute for culture. Assuming you’re working with a pre-existing condition, you have to assess the existing power structures and see where you have leverage, so you can articulate and advocate new worldviews, and maybe even move to amend the rules of the game.”
    • Turning girls of color into robot-obsessed techies | Fortune (21 December): “In three years, Black Girls Code has grown from a pilot with a dozen students to an organization with chapters in seven U.S. cities, and one in Johannesburg, South Africa. The Robot Expo sold-out before Black Girls Code could do any outreach to schools. In Berkeley recently, nearly 200 girls rotated through classes that were a big contrast to their usual school curriculum. They learned about building a circuit with Play-Doh to make an LED light up, snapped together machines made of Legos that could be hooked up to motors, and assembled robots that could wheel across the floor on their own steam.”
    • Lupita Nyong’o: Star Wars Finally Gets It Right | Black Girl Nerds (24 December): “We have yet to see a Black woman depicted in a major role within the Star Wars universe.  This will in fact be a monumental moment for both fans of Nyong’o and the Star Wars franchise itself.  I am giddy with excitement that I can finally see a woman of my ilk kick ass in a big budget sci-fi film.  This is a colossal point in history for all black girl nerds.”
    • Is Being a Jerk Necessary for Originality?  | Springer Link (6 December): “We aimed to investigate the relationship between lower levels of agreeableness and innovation process such as idea generation, promotion, and group utilization, as well as potential contextual moderators of these relationships. Disagreeable personalities may be helpful in combating the challenges faced in the innovation process, but social context is also critical. In particular, an environment supportive of original thinking may negate the utility of disagreeableness and, in fact, disagreeableness may hamper the originality of ideas shared.”
    • The story of Grace Hopper (aka Amazing Grace) | Stanley Colors (9 December): [comic] see also a previous SMBC comic.
    • No true conference organizers | ashley williams at Medium (22 December): “there are no true conference organizers. Just conference organizers doing better and worse jobs at making conferences safe. Instead of appealing to purity, let’s stay constructive and keep iterating on our efforts. Design is not opposed to iteration, rather, it is a very important element of every iterative step. The dichotomies and post-rationalization Jared demonstrates in his blog post render his opinion unfalsifiable and, as a result, premptively end any further critical conversation about how to make conferences safe. That’s the last thing we want.”
    • Deep Lab Book | Studio for Creative Inquiry (23 December): “Deep Lab is a congress of cyberfeminist researchers, organized by STUDIO Fellow Addie Wagenknecht to examine how the themes of privacy, security, surveillance, anonymity, and large-scale data aggregation are problematized in the arts, culture and society.”
    • [potentially not safe for work content] An Oral History of the First Cyberfeminists | Motherboard (11 December): “Over twenty years later, in the many feminist conversations happening online, groups like VNS Matrix and their compatriots in the Cyberfeminist trenches are not frequently cited. They should be. Their spirit of joyful subversion is more relevant, more cannily timely, more totally necessary today than it has ever been.​”
    • [warning for harassment and violence towards women] Why Are We Kicking Up Such a Fuss About The Interview? | In These Times (24 December): “Yet here we are, with the new and supremely newsworthy face of terrorism, The Interview’s cancellation. And it mirrors, in exact detail, what women have been going through all year. It’s international terrorism, whereas other cases were domestic, but if that makes a significant difference, no one told Oklahoma City. It’s a case of nations opposing each other, rather than one privileged group within a nation opposing and punishing a less privileged one”

     

    We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

    You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

    Thanks to everyone who suggested links.