Tag Archives: Linkspam

Like they say, if it quacks like a linkspam… (28 April 2015)


We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

(edited on May 1st to change the title, as the original title contained a pop-culture reference that was inappropriate given the content of the links)

The Linkspam Agenda (24 April 2015)

There are several pieces on the documentary Code: Debugging the Gender Gap today:

  • When Women Code | The Atlantic: “Whatever the case, the film’s director, Robin Hauser Reynolds, traces how American culture has shaped the perception—perpetuated by men and women—that coding is just for men. She offers a history of the technology industry, and conducts interviews with subjects ranging from the White House chief technology officer to teenage girls who are taking after-school coding classes. I spoke to Reynolds earlier this week about how she approached this sensitive—and sprawling—subject, and what she learned along the way.”
  • “Code” and the Quest for Inclusive Software | The New Yorker: “The result of Reynolds’s inquiries was screened at the Tribeca Film Festival on Sunday, with the première of “Code: Debugging the Gender Gap,” a documentary that aims to make sense of the dearth of women in computer science. “Code” has already received disproportionate amount of attention for a documentary by a relatively unknown filmmaker; Reynolds and her film, which was financed partly through a crowdfunding campaign, had been profiled in a number of major publications well before the première, reflecting the broad interest in the tech industry’s diversity problem.”
  • A New Documentary Nails How Terrible It Is for Women in Tech — and How to Fix It | Arts.Mic: “A documentary like Code can only do so much. Its power, however, is in the incredible women who have found success in tech despite overwhelming odds who speak during the film. Seeing them and seeing their work is a clear sign that no matter how difficult it is to effect change, it’s worth it.”

Other links:

  • LGBTQ – Queer Women In Tech Share Experiences: “‘I’m having a lot of second thoughts about the tech industry being progressive in the last five years,’ Joire says. With the tech boom, she’s seeing a lot more opportunists descending on the scene — some of whom are frustratingly narrow-minded.”
  • Now What? How to Create Fair Companies after the Ellen Pao Verdict | Medium: “Innovation in people practices has lagged behind every other dimension of business. Even in Silicon Valley, tech has been leveraged less when applied to people ops than to product development, financial operations, manufacturing, and sales. It makes no sense, in a world where the purpose of a startup is to upend an established business or an entire industry, that every company has the same boilerplate policy. For an industry built on innovation, tech has shown a remarkable lack of creativity when it comes to tackling issues of culture and people.”
  • Who is Sharla P. Boehm? | The Edtech Curmudgeon: “So there it is – Sharla Boehm wrote the code that demonstrated the feasibility of packed-switched networks. You can look up the original paper that she and Baran wrote, and read every line of code that she wrote and see the actual output from her program.” [that is to say, the code that originally demonstrated the feasibility of the Internet was written by a woman]
  • Lindi Emoungu | Women of Silicon Valley: “The exciting thing about tech is that you can use very powerful tools to solve any problem you can imagine. Technology places an immense amount of power in your hands and in your mind. My advice to girls pursuing a future in tech is not to squander that power in exchange for acceptance. The higher you go, the more you will encounter people who will say all of the right things and never advance you. Don’t slow down for those people. Go fast, work hard, be yourself, trust yourself and you will find the people you are supposed to do great things with.”
  • To Promote Diversity, Apple Increases The Number Of WWDC Scholarships | TechCrunch: “To encourage greater diversity amongst its developer community, Apple announced it’s increasing the number of WWDC scholarships this year which provide students and developers the opportunity to attend Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference taking place this June in San Francisco. Last year, Apple offered 200 scholarships by working with the National Center for Women & IT (NCWIT). But this year, the company says it has expanded its list of partner STEM organizations to more than 20 and will also increase the number of scholarships offers to 350.”
  • How to Fail at Coming Out Stories in Comics | Bisexual Books: “On April 22, 2015, comics retailers far and wide will be selling copies of All-New X-Men #40, which, spoiler, features the coming out of a major character from Marvel Comics’ original five X-Men (sort of): Bobby Drake, AKA Ice Man. On the one hand, I want to be loud and supportive, and to celebrate this wider diversity. But on the other hand, they do a really, really offensive crap job of it.”
  • So You’ve Been Publicly Scapegoated: Why We Must Speak Out on ‘Call-Out Culture’ | Feministing: “The publication of Jon Ronson’s So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed is the culmination of a recent trend: people of means and privilege engaged in well-remunerated shallow handwringing about “public shaming,” particularly through social media.”
  • Women Startup Competition and TeleSummit | Women Who Tech: “We’re excited to announce the first annual Women Startup Challenge, a crowdfunding competition in partnership with Craig Newmark of craigslist and craigconnects and investors Fred and Joanne Wilson.”
  • What Happens When There Are No Boys in the Room: A Report from Robyn’s Tekla Conference | Pitchfork: “For Robyn, making Tekla girls-only was about seeing ‘what happens when there are no boys in the room—maybe a girl decides that she wants to play the drums, and she wouldn’t if there was a boy there. A different dynamic happens, it frees the situation from some restrictive behaviors for girls. We’re rarely in a girl group when we just allow each other to play around and try stuff.’ She didn’t have a gateway to this arena as a kid, but ‘my parents used to have a theater group and they were on stage a lot, so that became something un-dramatic for me. I think that’s what it’s about—when you develop an interest, it usually comes from an environment that de-dramatizes things. Because then you’re able to find your own entrance into it.'”
  • Houston, We Have A Problem. | RUBY-WAN KENOOBIE: “I’m now at the point where ‘diversity in tech’ has become synonymous with white women. And I’m here to raise the red flag.”
  • Quantifying Silicon Valley’s Diversity Issue | WIRED: “At 27, Tracy Chou has become a leading voice for women in the tech industry by using data to call attention to how few of them are employed as engineers. She is an accomplished coder who had already worked at Facebook, Google, and the question-and-answer site Quora before arriving at Pinterest. And nearly two years ago, she took the simple but provocative step of uploading a spreadsheet—to the code-sharing platform Github, naturally—that companies could use to make public the number of female engineers in their ranks. The goal: to identify the scope of the problem as a first step toward making a stronger commitment to address it.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

ENOLINKSPAM (21 April 2015)

  • The Conversation No One Wants To Have: Gender Stereotyping | Forbes (April 16): “Two of the four panelists showed a lack of understanding of the subject; the moderator was unaware of the dictionary definition of feminism; and, some left feeling short-changed of the productive discussion they were promised. No statement seemed malicious; most simply seemed to circle the point of understanding without touching it.”
  • Hewlett-Packard’s Meg Whitman tech sector’s wealthiest woman: Wealth-X | The Financial Express (April 15): “The net worth of women on the Wealth-X list lags far behind their male peers in the technology sector”
  • Why Job Titles Matter If You Care About Diversity | MVSEVMSTORE (April 16): “But after working at a handful of different companies that de-emphasize titles, I’ve realized that there are drawbacks to titleless-ness, and that those drawbacks disproportionately impact people who conform the least to the stereotypes of their role.”
  • tim | Last Exit to Loyalty (On Holding On Past The) (April 14): “I wrote the rest of this essay to wrestle with the question: “Given the many advantages of having a comfortable, high-paying, flexible desk job, are the frustrations I feel really bad enough to justify taking the risky path of searching for something more grounding? In the absence of pure intellectual pleasure and in the absence of the feeling of social benefit, will continuing to work in the software industry help me more than it hurts?” The short answers are “yes” and “no”. Here’s the long answer.”
  • tim | Laying Down the Banhammer (April 17): “My feminism is for me. But Geek Feminism isn’t for me, anymore. It does, and should continue to center, feminism that’s for women. Those of us who are men need to make our own feminist spaces, not ones that exclude women but ones that can occupy a space that doesn’t suck attention and resources away from the more pressing needs…”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Nobody Promised You a Linkspam (19 April 2015)

  • Researchers quit science Hall of Fame panel over lack of women nominees | CBCNews (April 11): “Judy Illes and Catherine Anderson resigned from the selection committee of the Canadian Science and Engineering Hall of Fame this month after realizing that no women had been nominated for induction two years in a row.”
  • To fight income inequality, tell your friends how much you make | Quartz (April 14): “As Congress meets to debate the merits of government intervention in the issue of equal pay, women and minorities need to realize they aren’t alone. And the best way to do that is to start talking about their paychecks. By breaking the outdated workplace taboo that expects silence around salary, we can create a community of honesty and empowerment.”
  • Meet ‘digital nun': the Sister funding her monastery through her apps | The Telegraph (April 5): “running a monastery requires income and – while nuns elsewhere bring in money by making soaps or jams – Sister Catherine has established a professional web design and maintenance service, offering everything from hosting to content management to social media integration, which goes by the name of “Veilnet”.”
  • The worst question you could ask women in a job interview | The Washington Post (April 14): “If companies relied less on what people made in their past jobs, and more on the actual market value of the job being filled, they’d be less likely to perpetuate the gap between men’s and women’s salaries. After all, when employers base someone’s new salary off of their former salary elsewhere, they just compound any past biases or negotiation disadvantages.”
  • No Country for All Women | The Gilliad (April 15): “People make ill-advised statements online all the time; some people seem to make, if not a career of it, then at least an avocation. The appropriate response, I’m inclined to think, is a private shrug, sigh, or roll of the eyes before moving on. At maximum, I’ll say something sarcastic or deeply cynical within earshot of a small audience of disinterested cats. Which is how it should be, probably.* *For the most part; there are always exceptions, e.g. if it’s hate speech or bullying, SHUT IT DOWN (if possible). If it’s more like, “Here’s a wrongly attributed motivational quote I just HAD to share with everyone I’ve ever met,” then idk, I’d let it go.”
  • The girl game archival project that’s rewriting geek history | The Verge (April 17): “More generally, Rhizome is chipping away at the overgeneralized view that technology is a “historically male” field, where women are just now struggling to get a foothold. “It is not like this is the first time that women were into games,” says Espenscheid. “It’s not the first time that women are active on the internet. If you look, there have been all kinds of people making web pages when there were no graphical editors, when you had to type in HTML code, actually. When you say, ‘Oh god, nobody can do that, we need some white boys in hoodies to do this for us!’ — [every] kind of person has been doing that, in the ’90s for example. But this is very easily forgotten.””
  • Season 2 of Black Feminist Blogger is Coming! | Black Girl Nerds (April 15): “Season 2 of Black Feminist Blogger is set to officially premiere on April 20th. Black Feminist Blogger is a new web-series centering on the protagonist Latoya, a queer black feminist blogger who is attempting to negotiate her identity as a feminist and a writer within the competitive terrain of the online feminist marketplace. She writes for a feminist magazine called Sapphire Mouth run by a white woman named Marie who continuously employs unethical tricks to make it to the top. Marie’s goal is to have Sapphire Mouth be the “next Jezebel.””
    Gaming, Entrepreneurship and Pioneering: A Young Woman’s Nontraditional Path From Gamer to Game Designer | HuffPost Icon Next (April 15): “I attended that same Career Day that got me my job at JumpStart three years ago as a speaker and had the opportunity to talk to high school students about my story and my career. I am returning this year as well as attending a conference for young girls where I am going to talk about my experiences and being a female in a primarily male industry. I think it’s great to motivate and inspire students to pursue their passions. When I was in high school, I thought my grades were going to stop me from achieving any success in life, and I want others in that situation to know that that is not true.”
  • My first #WCW Aisha Bowe Founder of STEM Board and Former NASA engineer | STEM Girl Social Network (April 15): “At only 29 years old, Aisha who is an aerospace engineer, manages STEMBoard’s multi-million defense-contracts and private sector clients. STEMBoard is composed of aerospace and defense engineers who are leading innovative and disruptive change within the defense and intelligence community.”
  • Reham Fagiri: From Goldman Sachs to Start-up CEO | Lady Clever (April 15): “Her journey started when, at 16, she left her family in Sudan to attend university in America. After getting her degree(s), Fagiri landed at Goldman Sachs as an engineer and analyst, holding other positions in the company during her tenure there, and participating in Goldman Sachs’ 10,000 Women Initiative in order to share her knowledge with and empower other women. Now, she is the CEO of AptDeco, a company that makes it safer for women in New York City to buy and sell furniture without having strangers showing up to their homes.”

 

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Dance The Linkspam Away (17 April 2015)

This was the week of tableflip.club!

  • tableflip dot club: “Women are leaving your tech company because you don’t deserve to keep us around.”
  • Why Women in Tech Need to Start Flipping Tables | Motherboard: “I think the huge response to the piece makes it clear how much these are the shared experiences women in tech have, so I’m glad I did go all-out. I’ll probably reveal myself eventually. It’s not like people don’t already know my opinions, but commentary on individual issues are a bit different from a call for women in tech to flip all the tables :)”
  • Screw leaning in. It’s time to slam the door in Silicon Valley’s face | The Guardian: “Even as an outside observer, I found the tableflip.club manifesto energizing. It has the feeling of a furious tweetstorm or impassioned speech – it goes beyond a mission statement and into the realm of oratory. It’s a huge departure from the usual women-in-tech rhetoric, which usually focuses on prying the doors of the tech world open through education, a positive attitude and changing the work environment. Nobody ever advocates just slamming the door back in Silicon Valley’s face.”

Other links:

  • Not the affirmative action you meant, not the history you’re making | Epiphany 2.0: “See, in America we often forget that the various initiatives which made up the capital-A Affirmative Action program were based on policies and procedures that have always existed for white men… SFFdom has not been immune to this societal tendency to give straight white guys more, treat them more kindly, eagerly open doors to them that are firmly shut against others.”
  • Codes of conduct and the trade-offs of copyleft — Crooked Timber: “But the first step might be — if you’re trying to get your community to adopt a code of conduct, you might benefit by looking at other freedom-restricting tradeoffs the community is okay with, so you can draw out that comparison.”
  • Does 18F Pass the Bechdel Test for Tech? | 18F: “We decided to see how many 18F projects pass this modified test. To pass, a project had to have at least one function written by a woman dev that called another function written by another woman dev.”
  • This Public Shaming Is Not Like The Other | Buzzfeed: “What makes this book an uncomfortable, if distant, cousin of GamerGate and men’s rights activist logic is that it, too, relies on a series of false equivalencies and muddy distinctions in order to elevate being shamed on social media to epic proportions. These sorts of distortions are dangerous because they minimize — and even threaten to erase — far more systematic and serious problems that have taken years to even reach the public consciousness.”
  • Black Girls Code Founder: To Bring Diversity to Tech, First We Need Role Models | Inc.com: “Bryant credits her own mentor, an electrical engineering upperclassman she met in college who was black and female, for keeping her — a student from inner city Memphis — in technology and in school. ”
  • Help Me Help You | Jenna Pederson: “I am asked, in what turns out to be a not so awesome way, if I’ll consider speaking at a conference or event. And if I won’t, do I know any other women who will. Sometimes this request comes after the speaker list has already been set and organizers have realized they don’t have enough diversity on the speaker lineup. Or it comes in a passive-aggressive, backhanded comment like ‘Well, if only Jenna would have submitted a talk…’ with a side-glance my way. Wait… so now it’s my fault?”
  • As Tech Giants Push For Diversity, Blacks And Latinos Are Fleeing Once-Diverse San Francisco | International Business Times: “It’s been a year since many tech companies in Silicon Valley released workforce transparency reports laying bare a sorry track record in minority hiring and announced plans to be more inclusive. But the Bay Area’s changing demographics are working against them. Local African-American and Hispanic residents are employed only in minuscule numbers by the tech industry, and increasingly finding themselves priced out and forced to leave.”
  • The Attention Game | Accidentally in Code: “This idea that you do things for “exposure” where the formula is exposure -> ??? -> profit. OK maybe you can argue that this model works for Kim Kardashian but not, I think for most of us. It didn’t work for Monica Lewinsky. Exposure is not inherently valuable. The value is in what results from it.”
  • Female Programmer Denied Job Because of Her ‘Unprofessional’ Attire | Daily Dot: “Elizabeth is a senior at Oberlin College in Ohio, and like many college seniors, she’s currently interviewing for jobs. But one interview made her so angry that she took to Facebook to vent her frustration.”
  • What They Really Mean When They Say They’re Not a Feminist | Everyday Feminism: “If you don’t call yourself a feminist, see if you find some of your reasons here. The stories in this comic can help us all have more respect for the wide range of ways we stand up to oppression.”
  • Project Opportunity: Contribute Stories on Digital Labor | HASTAC: “I’m currently launching a project that will act as this kind of publication, using familiar aesthetics and tropes of tech and business media to tell digital labor stories that usually don’t get coverage. The aim is to use familiar media elements to disrupt (to use a popular tech-industry word) dialogues on digital technology and the labor it runs on.”
  • BGN’s Women in Gaming Series: Nichol Bradford | Black Girl Nerds: “Nichol is currently CEO of The Willow Group, whose mission is to permanently move 100 million people into a state of fundamental well-being by 2025. She is also the Executive Director of the Transformative Technology Lab at Sofia University that is working outside traditional research boundaries to find creative ways to manage the intersection of technology and consciousness. We had a chance to talk about what it takes to be the architect of your own success, the power of “raising your hand” to create opportunities and the benefits of being obsessive about your passions in life.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

I’m a Member of the Linkspam Crew

  • Beyond Storytelling: Actionable Ways to Help with Tech’s “Woman Problem” | Autostraddle (April 11): “How many times do we have to tell these stories before they become real — before we all agree that this is a problem, and more than that, agree to do something about it? The conversation around sexism in the tech industry is completely halted in the “telling our stories” phase. I am sick of talking about “tech’s diversity problem.” I want to move the conversation forward, and I want to make things better.”
  • Sexism and Fonts | Typographica (April 8): “We spend a lot of time critiquing typefaces: their formal qualities, their historical references, their contemporary influences. We spend a bit less time discussing how those fonts are marketed and advertised. […] Consider a few choice lines from the microsites that describe… the type: “the flowing curves of a woman’s body” “all wrapped up in the leggy body of a Brazilian supermodel” “Like a supermodel, it can’t be squeezed into every situation.” “packed with alternates to play with… enough to turn you on and satisfy” “It looks good dressed down or in a little black dress.” Is talking about and presenting type in the visual language of seductive advertising sexist?”
  • Girls Make Games Proves Future Of The Gaming Industry Won’t Look Like A Boys Club | iDigitalTimes (April 9): About the formation of Girls Make Games, a summer camp for girls aged 9-13 to learn skills in game design, leading to creating successful games such as the newly-Greenlit The Hole Story.
  • Coding Scholarship for High School Girls – Kode with Karlie Kloss | Flatiron School: Flatiron School teams up with model Karlie Kloss to provide full scholarships for high school girls to learn software engineering.
  • Where Are the Women of Color in New Media Art? | Hyperallergic (April 7): “If radical and marginalized voices were meant to be a part of the conversation, why was the group specifically hand-picked? Why not allow women to have a seat at the table and join the conversation? It becomes challenging when [Women of Color] and [Queer & Trans Women of Color] are exchanging and sharing knowledge only among themselves — the situation becomes circular. The internet certainly allows for groups to engage in global conversations, but the fact remains that a “congress of cyberfeminist[s]” comprised of predominantly cis white women discussing issues of privacy, surveillance, new media, and digital art at a prestigious university doesn’t exactly help the communities that become the subjects of their discussions. It can be isolating to women in search of this type of (necessary) dialogue.”
  • Silicon Valley’s Other Diversity Problem: Age Bias in Tech by Grace Wong | Model View Culture (April 9): “But the open-mindedness that permits very young people to succeed in tech seems to go out the window when it comes to the other end of the age spectrum. Individuals who try to enter the tech industry via a non-traditional route are frequently told to “fake it until you make it,” but age is a tricky thing to try to fake. If asked outright, once you answer honestly, it feels like you’ve revealed something that can’t be taken back. And you have no control over how it will influence the way your abilities are judged.”
  • Making a makerspace – part 1 | Velochic Design: Shirley Hicks writes about the process of co-founding the Red Mountain Makers space in Alabama.
  • Fresh Romance Diverse Comics Magazine Announces New Creative Teams and Gail Simone Goal | The Mary Sue (April 8): New goals for the Kickstarter project for Fresh Romance, created to provide more opportunities for women in comics.
  • Who wants to be CEO? Not millennial women. | Fortune (April 3): “In a recent study by talent management firm Saba and WorkplaceTrends.com, just 36% of respondents who said they aspire to a C-level position at their company were women. Also disinterested in the top job: Millennials, who accounted for only 31% of those who said they wanted a spot in the C-Suite. That compares with 68% of older employees wanting top-level jobs. What’s going on here? When it comes to women, there’s one obvious factor at work: A lack of role models.”
  • 2014 VIDA Women in Literary Arts Count (April 4): Exploring the representation of women, including a specific survey of women of color, in literary writing.
  • A 12-Year-Old Girl Takes On The Video Game Industry | NPR Planet Money (April 8): “In a lot of video games, the default character is a guy. If you want to play as a female character, it’s not easy. Often you have to pay. […] Maddie decided to test her claim with a research project. She downloaded the 50 most popular games in the same category as Temple Run. She counted up how many offered female characters and how much they cost. And she handwrote her results on a spreadsheet. Out of the 50 games, 37 offered free male characters. Just five offered free female characters.”

 

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Cold as Linkspam (10 April 2015)

  • Notes on Reconnaissance and the need for harassment policies at SF Conventions | A.C. Buchanan (March 21): “As a generalised statement, the people most likely to be concerned about harassment are the people who are most likely to experience it. And these are often the people who have the least resources, the least energy, and are often just plain sick of fighting this everywhere they go. Phrases like “I want to learn” or “show me how to do this” are often used as derailing to further suck energy from people who have least ability.”
  • Anti-Abuse Team new policies & procedures — Public comment period April 3-17 | WisCon (April 3): “Since last fall, members of the WisCon Anti-Abuse Team have been working on developing new anti-harassment policies and procedures for our convention. We have been guided by the goal of making WisCon a safer and more enjoyable experience for everyone. To that end, we have worked to develop a policy that 1) makes reporting easy, 2) is compassionate and reporter centered, 3) facilitates a timely response and clear communication, and 4) reduces incidence of harassment through member education and by fostering a supportive, respectful climate.”
  • App For Hiring Decisions | Dilbert Comic Strip (April 6): Dilbert covers sexism in tech hiring and the workplace in this comic, as well as in Useless Mansplainers (April 7) and Mansplaining The Network (April 8).
  • How can we really get more women into tech? | Finding Ada (April 2): “Money is the one thing that never gets discussed in the public conversation about women in tech or STEM. Money gets glossed over, as if grassroots groups magically survive on the smell of a Jane Austen £10 note, or as if all we need are volunteers.”
  • Feminists in Tech: Please Stop Treating Sex Work as a Contagion by Eva Gantz | Model View Culture (April 6): “This view is every bit as reactionary as a conservative desire to regulate female sexuality. It places the blame squarely on porn performers, and removes any responsibility from men in tech. I received a clear message: sex work apparently undermines everything that women in tech are fighting for.”
  • G(o)rrrr  | Crooked Timber (April 6): At the General Online Research conference in March, women volunteerswere wearing “GORgeous” t-shirts, men volunteers were wearing “GORilla” T-shirts. The conference also had an all-man panel on “Behavioural Economics: A new idea of man — a need for new methods?”. The German Society for Online Research, which sponsored the conference, responded in the comments.
  • Teen girls coding their way to a brighter future | CNN (April 2): “Set up by local Amadu Mohammad, the non-profit organization supports 250 girls between the age of six and 18, priming them for formal education through extracurricular classes in reading, math, poetry and information technology. Its goal is to break through social barriers and provide Nima with a generation of female role models, and so the group provides school funding to help the girls shape their own future.”
  • Reddit eliminates salary talk from hiring | Mashable (April 6): “Ellen Pao, the interim CEO of Reddit, has seen women struggle with salary negotiations. So she’s eliminating money talk from the company’s hiring process. In her first interview since losing the landmark Silicon Valley trial, Pao told The Wall Street Journal that she has eliminated salary negotiations from the hiring process at Reddit, where she currently serves as interim CEO.”
  • The key to getting ahead for female tech entrepreneurs | The Age (April 2): “As a female entrepreneur Woodhouse said that having male mentors and advisors willing to ride shotgun with her in business meetings has been essential. She added that she had also struggled to find software developers who were willing to work with a woman.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

There’s No Linkspam Like Show Linkspam

A few more about the implications of the Ellen Pao trial:

More general links:

  • Things My Male Tech Colleagues Have Actually Said to Me, Annotated | The Toast: ““It’s not ‘P.C.’ to say this, but…” Thank you for this helpful preface alerting me to the fact that I can spend the next thirty seconds fantasizing about Star Trek without missing anything important.”
  • Tech conference bans scantily-clad “booth babes” | Fortune: “The fact that some large, respected companies still use women in body paint to try and draw attention to their wares seems outdated at best—kind of like handing out breath mint containers inscribed with a company logo. And while it’s not to blame for the overall dearth of women at many of these conferences, it certainly doesn’t promote an atmosphere that’s welcoming to both genders: Let’s face it, these companies are explicitly marketing specifically to men, and in the crudest way possible.”
  • A game that speaks of Africa | Polygon: About the upcoming game Aurion, developed by Cameroonian game company Kiro’o Games. “What we are trying to do in Aurion is to give another perspective. The power in our game is mainly a consequence of an inner path, not just your physical training. To fulfill your own goal you must count on the connection between you and your ancestors.”
  • Smart Watches: Am I F*cking Missing Something? | Autostraddle: “Perhaps it’s foolish to compare Google Glass and Apple Watch, but it’s hard not to—they’re the highest profile wearables so far. To me, Glass is an actual real technological development—it allows for entirely new and life-changing interaction as seen in the above video. It’s not some text messages on your wrist. I suppose what really gets me about the Apple Watch is this: there is no innovation here. Nothing about this makes the world a better place. It doesn’t even make the world a more connected place—the Apple Watch does nothing that existing technology can’t do. I’d go so far as to say it does nothing that Apple’s own existing technology can’t do.”
  • Sexual Violence in Epic Fantasy (TW) | Manic Pixie Dream Worlds: “Do these deeply harmful patterns occur in other dudebro epic fantasy novels? Do these cycles self-perpetuate in our narratives? Is it recursive with real world violence against women in geek culture — e.g., is threatening women with rape online when they get too uppity and have opinions and stuff a learned behavior that’s inspired in part by our problematic narratives around sexual violence?”
  • Michelle Rodriguez Talks Representation, Fridging, and Hollywood’s Problem With Female Characters | The Mary Sue: “I have such a strong sense of self, there are certain lines I just won’t cross. I’m really picky about the parts I choose. I can’t be the slut. I cannot be just the girlfriend. I can’t be the girl who gets empowered because she’s been raped. I can’t be the girl who gets empowered and then dies. So I just said to myself, look, you’re going to just have to create your own archetype, doesn’t matter if you go broke doing it. And I almost did go broke, twice! But people finally got it: OK, Michelle is not malleable, you’re not going to influence her by shining fame and money at her, and they stopped offering me that sort of stuff.”
  • Cards Against Humanity releases science deck to benefit women in STEM | Circa News: “Each pack of 30 cards costs $10 and proceeds benefit the Cards Against Humanity Science Ambassador Scholarship, aimed to cover four years of tuition for one high school or college student who identifies as a woman. The special deck features science themed-lines like “supermassive black hole” and “the quiet majesty of the sea turtle,” written by the Cards Against Humanity staff, author Zach Weinersmith and astronomer and writer Phil Plait.”
  • Fewer than three percent of land plant species named by women: Author gender over 260 years | International Association for Plant Taxonomy: “Female authors make up 12.20% of the total number of authors, and they published 2.82% of names. Half of the female authors published 1.5 or more names, while half the male authors published 3 or more names. Female contribution has accounted for more than 1% of new species names since 1900, and now stands at 11.97%. The difference in productivity between male and female authors has declined over time, and female authors are now 80% as productive as their male counterparts. In spite of botany’s traditional image as a feminine pursuit, women’s contribution was not significantly reflected in species authorship until the twentieth century, around the same time as in other branches of science.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The Linkspam of All Maladies (3 April 2015)

Starting out with a handful of links related to Ellen Pao:

  • The Limits of the Ellen Pao Silver Lining | Inc.: “It’s a sinking feeling reinforced by Claire Cain Miller’s New York Times interviews about the verdict with venture capitalists. When asked what they learned from the whole experience, they told Miller the case had taught them to:be less overtly sexist in work emails; formalize human resources standards; and be less hasty about declining to fund female entrepreneurs so quickly. Big progress, right? I mean, those are all good things, but shouldn’t they pretty much be table stakes at this point?”
  • Ellen Pao and the Sexism You Can’t Quite Prove — NYMag: “It is a form of soft discrimination that I fear might be all too familiar to all too many women — and often I find it hard to explain to my male friends and colleagues. Occasionally, I even find myself struggling to convince them that it is discrimination, and that it has consequences. It is pervasive. It is persistent. And it is so, so exhausting, all those subtle hints that you are a little different and that your behavior is being interpreted a little differently. On top of that, it does have profound consequences, if made through a million tiny cuts. The idea is to force covert sexism to be made overt where you can, around the conference table if not at the ski lodge or the cocktail party. Only then can you stamp it out.”
  • Ellen Pao, Kleiner Perkins and foiled champions — Medium: “We have gotten carried away with our own fabulousness to the degree that we don’t even see newcomers or people who choose to labor in the background. It’s a kind of power and influence that is exclusionary — making it less possible, month by month, for people outside power circles to enter the halls of influence, partake of its bounty and contribute to our industry and the world. This isn’t right, kind or productive.”

Other links:

  • Wonder Woman’s Invisible Jet Now on Display | AirSpace: Love this April Fool’s joke from the Smithsonian!
  • Call for proposals: !!Con 2015 | composition.al: “This year, for the second year in a row, my friends and I are organizing !!Con (pronounced bang bang con), a conference about the joy, excitement, and surprise of programming. !!Con is a conference with “a mission of radical inclusivity” where all the talks are ten minutes long1 and cover a bewilderingly wide range of topics.”
  • tim | “Call-out culture is very problematic,” said the naked emperor frantically | tim: “The general principles of skepticism, evidence-based decision-making, and even civility can be useful tools, but don’t obligate us to entertain those who use them in a way that sets off our bullshit detectors. And anti-call-out-culture crusaders are obviously insincere — if they were sincere, wouldn’t they spend some time doing something other than the activity they claim to detest (namely, calling people out)?”
  • Your Brief And Wondrous Guide To Contemporary Queer Comics | Huffington Post: “The following artists and creatives identify as queer, among other labels, like, for example, comic, illustrator, storyteller and writer. They defy rigid categorization in both life and work, weaving wonderfully unique and sex-positive tales about everything from college parties and intergalactic adventures to a criminal potato. If the following artists show us anything, it’s that there’s no one way to be queer. And why would you want to, when each individual perspective looks oh-so beautiful?”
  • Galactic Suburbia » Episode 116: 18 March 2015: “It’s our special 2014 Galactic Suburbia Award episode! Listen to find out our winner and shortlist for our award to honour activism and/or communication that advances the feminist conversation in the field of speculative fiction.”
  • How to defeat Internet bullies – CSMonitor.com: [CW: examples of online harassment and abuse] “Danielle Citron, a leading expert on privacy and online harassment, says it’ll take enforcing existing state laws as well as as broader societal acknowledgement that what happens online has real world effects, too. I recently spoke about these issues with Ms. Citron, the Lois K. Macht Research Professor of Law at the University of Maryland.
  • We Need More Badass Women: TV Bosses Tell Us Why The Bechdel Test Isn’t Enough | MTV News: “Some male writers might be absolutely fantastic at writing well-rounded, complex female characters (and vice-versa), but when it comes down to it, the consensus amongst the showrunners we interviewed seems to be that diversifying a writing staff leads to more complex characters. And since most TV writers look more like Rick Grimes than Carol Peletier — more like Michael Scott than Leslie Knope — it’s shows dominated by white men, with female characters existing as extensions of those men, that you’ll continue to see. (Minus, of course, the several standouts we’ve already mentioned.)”
  • Why This Disabled Woman No Longer Identifies as a Feminist | Disability and Representation | Changing the Cultural Conversation: “But what really, really drives me to bitter tears and raging inside my head is when people are all INTERSECTIONALITY FOREVER and WE’RE NOT SINGLE ISSUE FEMINISTS and WE’RE INCLUSIVE OF EVERYBODY and they chronically leave out disability from the analysis. And then when I mention the omission, I am met with silence (on a good day) and hostility (on a needlessly crappy one). The result is only more bitter tears and more raging inside my head.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Linkspam for people who hate links (31 March 2015)


We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.