Tag Archives: Linkspam

She who controls linkspam controls the universe (30 May 2014)

  • Esther Dyson: Breaking through tech’s glass ceiling | BBC News (May 27): “Esther Dyson has been called “the most influential woman in all the computer world”. After fostering some of the biggest names in technology – and growing wealthy in the process – she is now trying to help people live better with a new health initiative.”
  • on claiming feminist identity (May 28): “but more fundamentally, i disagree with jean and scott that making feminism more acceptable for more people to claim is inherently a step forward. it’s similar to how i don’t believe that making a programming language gain popularity makes it a better programming language. yes, there is work to be done in dispelling myths and disseminating good information. but in the process of “selling” something you believe in, you become protective of it, and then suddenly defensive in the face of valid criticism. you also wind up needing to water down and compromise the ideals you’re selling until it’s palatable to the people who really fundamentally are not on your side. (in shanley’s words: “at last, a feminism the patriarchy can get behind!”)”
  • New STEM Education Initiative Inspires Girls To Earn Less Than Men In Scientific Career | The Onion (May 27): ““Today’s girls have the potential to become the physicists and chemists of tomorrow, powerlessly watching as their male counterparts are promoted over them, their intellects are ignored, and their research is underrepresented in scientific journals. Our mission is to let every young woman know that such a future isn’t a fantasy; it’s a reality they can most certainly achieve.””
  • #22667 replaced occurrences of master/slave terminology with leader/follower by fcurella · Pull Request #2692 · django/django (May 20): “The docs and some tests contain references to a master/slave db configuration. While this terminology has been used for a long time, those terms may carry racially charged meanings to users. This patch replaces all occurrences of master and slave with ‘leader’ and ‘follower'”
  • Sexual Predators: The Imagined and the Real | Psychology Today (May 5): “What makes our national obsession with sexual predation destructive is that it is used to justify systematically excluding young people from public life, both online and off.”
  • Twitter to Release All Tweets to Scientists: A Trove of Billions of Tweets Will Be a Research Boon and An Ethical Dilemma | Scientific American (June 1): “Until now, most interested scientists have been working with a limited number of tweets. Although a majority of tweets are public, if scientists want to freely search the lot, they do it through Twitter’s application programming interface, which currently scours only 1 percent of the archive. But that is about to change: in February the company announced that it will make all its tweets, dating back to 2006, freely available to researchers.”
  • The Whiteness of Apple | Random House Canada (May 27): “Like whiteness itself, Apple goes about becoming “normal” by never actually calling itself that, but insisting that it is nonetheless.”
  • Your Mother Calls Bullshit on Silicon Valley | AnnMaria’s Blog (May 29): “By focusing on a narrow demographic, products are made that don’t reflect the needs and interests of a large swath of the population, like mothers of school children, and teachers. Educational products made by people who have never been in a classroom often begin with the assumption that teachers are the problem and technology is the solution. Funding people over 30, and women, to make products THEY would want to use is a missed opportunity.”

She-Hulk

At the John August/ Craig Maison Scriptntoes live podcast last week, screenwriter David S. Goyer who is writing the first film that She-Hulk will appear in called her “a green porn star that only Hulk could fuck”.

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Linkspam special edition: #YesAllWomen (May 29 2014)

Warning: many of these links discuss misogyny and violence against women in general, some specific incidents of violence, particularly the Isla Vista killings. Graphic content will have additional warnings.

Due to our editorial process for linkspams, we’re sometimes not right on top of breaking news. Usually at least 12 and often 24 hours passes between the email that gathers up all the suggestions and emails the spam team doing its thing and the assigned spammer having time to check them all and post the linkspam, and that’s when there’s no holidays and such. Thus, yesterday’s spam didn’t include discussion of the Isla Vista killings and #YesAllWomen and other discussions. Welcome, sadly, to a special edition.

  • Warning: recounting of rape in geek culture. Your Princess Is in Another Castle: Misogyny, Entitlement, and Nerds | Arthur Chu at The Daily Beast (May 27): “[L]isten up, fellow self-pitying nerd boys—we are not the victims here. We are not the underdogs. We are not the ones who have our ownership over our bodies and our emotions stepped on constantly by other people’s entitlement. We’re not the ones where one out of six of us will have someone violently attempt to take control of our bodies in our lifetimes.”
  • [Isla Vista Killer] And Men Who Hate Women | The Belle Jar (May 24): “We have no evidence yet that he suffered from any kind of mental illness or was seeking any sort of treatment. Immediately claiming that with no proof to back that fact up leads to the further stigmatization of the mentally ill, and contributes to the (incorrect) assumption that mental illness equals violence, and vice versa. We don’t know whether [killer] was mentally ill. What we do know is that he was a Men’s Rights Activist, or MRA.”
  • Men’s Work by Paul Kivel | Lis at staranise (May 24): “I want to remind everyone to practice self-care and remember the people who are doing real good in the world. The more progress we make, the more individual events stand out. We actually live in a time of unprecedented safety and peace, whether you’re comparing us to 200 years ago or 20 years ago. Gendered violence specifically has gone down a lot in the last 20 years. There are reasons to be hopeful. It’s just easier to forget that because as the forest thins out, the trees loom so much bigger.”
  • A hashtag activism guide for men | Jess Zimmerman at The Daily Dot (May 26): “Women on Twitter were appalled and frightened by this virulent misogynist rhetoric, but we were not especially surprised, and then we were kind of appalled and frightened that we weren’t especially surprised. So we came together to share stories of the harassment, aggression, dismissal, and dehumanization that women—#YesAllWomen—face every day… And boy, did this piss off some dudes!”

While we’re here, we’re using a tool developed and perfected by women of color activists:

See also Suey Park’s Hashtags as Decolonial Projects with Radical Origins.

Hashtag credits: we believe that #YesAllWomen‘s creator has asked not to be credited at this time. Please let us know if this is incorrect. Readers will also want to read the #YesAllWhiteWomen tweets; we haven’t seen a definitive statement of the founder of #YesAllWhiteWomen, but it may be @JennMJack on May 26. If further credits are needed, we welcome corrections.

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs. If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Comment note: general discussion of misogyny and violence welcome, as well as specific responses to the Isla Vista killings and discussion in recent days. However, please do not name the Isla Vista killer in comments here. Remember Katherine Cooper, Veronika Weiss, Christopher Michael-Martinez, Cheng Yuan Hong, George Chen and Weihan Wang instead.

How soon is Linkspam? (28 May 2014)

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

The linkspam instinct (24 May 2014)

Announcements etc:

  • Long Hidden, a Kickstarter-funded anthology of spec fic centering marginalised characters, is now available for purchase.
  • Registration for Solutions Summit 2014: Women in Science Writing (June 13–15 at MIT) is open.
  • Model View Culture’s Queer issue is out! Individual articles will be scattered over the spam over the next week, but check out the whole thing.
  • FOSS4G — a conference for open source geospatial software, to be held in Portland Oregon in September — is dedicating 50% of their travel grants funding for women and minority attendees. Applications close May 30. They’re also looking for donations to the travel fund; you can donate when you register for the event.

Gender diversity data and tech companies:

Spam!

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Not All Linkspams (20 May 2014)

Calls to action (writing/$)

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on PinboardDelicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Pink fluffy unicorns dancing on linkspams (16 May 2014)

  • Study: Gender Bias In Digital Marketing Is Real | Ginny Marvin at Search Engine Land (May 14): “Across the board, female account reps received below average satisfaction scores, and every single male account representative received higher satisfaction scores than the highest rated female. To answer the question of whether men are just better at making AdWords recommendations than women, WordStream pulled performance data from its AdWords Grader tool for the accounts included in the survey. They looked at aggregate grades for the accounts overseen by male and female reps. Lo and behold, the accounts supported by female reps had higher AdWords Grader scores than those managed by men — by 19 percent.”
  • Curbing Online Abuse Isn’t Impossible. Here’s Where We Start | Laura Hudson at Wired (May 15) [warning: rape threats, misogynistic abuse, and discussion of online abuse]: “Riot Games (publisher of League of Legends) found that persistently negative players were only responsible for roughly 13 percent of the game’s bad behavior. The other 87 percent was coming from players whose presence, most of the time, seemed to be generally inoffensive or even positive. These gamers were lashing out only occasionally, in isolated incidents – but their outbursts often snowballed through the community. Banning the worst trolls wouldn’t be enough to clean up League of Legends, Riot’s player behavior team realized. Nothing less than community-wide reforms could succeed.”
  • The Rise of the Voluntariat | Geoff Shullenberger at Jacobin (May 15): “Internships have made work more like non-work by uncoupling it from the expectation of wages. Social media have made non-work more like work by permitting the commodification of spheres of activity previously never conceived of as labor. The emergence of the voluntariat follows logically from both of these developments.”
  • Abolishing Mammography Screening Programs? A View from the Swiss Medical Board | Nikola Biller-Andorno and Peter Jüni at The New England Journal of Medicine (April 16): “It is easy to promote mammography screening if the majority of women believe that it prevents or reduces the risk of getting breast cancer and saves many lives through early detection of aggressive tumors. We would be in favor of mammography screening if these beliefs were valid. Unfortunately, they are not, and we believe that women need to be told so. From an ethical perspective, a public health program that does not clearly produce more benefits than harms is hard to justify. Providing clear, unbiased information, promoting appropriate care, and preventing overdiagnosis and overtreatment would be a better choice.”
  • Doctor Who Names First Female Directors Since 2010 | Susana Polo at The Mary Sue (May 15): “The last episode of Doctor Who to be directed by a woman was “Amy’s Choice,” in 2010, and it remains the only lady-directed episode in the entirety of Steven Moffat’s tenure as showrunner. Not that lady-directed episodes were so exactly abundant before he took over, but they will now be joined by two more episodes when the show returns for Series 8. And that new director is… long-time television director Rachel Talalay, who also sat the director’s chair for Lori Petty‘s cult favorite Tank Girl. [...] As the show has come under increasing criticism for the limited or clichéd picture it draws with its female characters, eyes have turned to the fact that there are very few women behind the cameras.”
  • We Can Do Better | Ri Liu (May 14): “This is a visualisation of the gender disparity in engineering teams in the tech industry. [...] The creator of this project acknowledges that gender is not always binary, but due to the nature of the data available, only a male/female breakdown is displayed at this time.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Honey I Shrunk the Linkspam (May 13 2014)

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on PinboardDelicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

I Find Your Lack Of Linkspam Disturbing (9 May 2014)

First up, a number of linkspams about books, comics, and writing:

  • Politics Belong in Science Fiction | Foz Meadows at Huffington Post (May 2): “Science fiction both is, and always has been, a political genre. When we tell stories about a future in outer space populated entirely by white people, who constitute a global minority; when we describe societies set a hundred, three hundred, a thousand years in the future but which still lack gender equality, and whose sexual mores mimic those of the 1950s, that is no less a political decision than choosing to write diversely.”
  • Dear columnists, romance fiction is not your [slur] | Kay Mayo at The Drum (April 17) (update: warning for gendered slur, with violent implications, in the title of this piece): “I’d like to know: why is romance fiction the punching bag of the literary world? Why are romance readers the laughing-stock of feminist commentators? Why can’t people just let women read sexy things without telling us we’re doing something wrong? When writers deride romance readers for their reading choices, their argument becomes meaningless, and here’s why: not all romance books are the same. When someone insists that there is a formula for romance fiction, it’s clear that they haven’t bothered to look at any serious analyses of the genre, nor do they understand what “genre” actually means.”
  • Comics Legend Brian Michael Bendis on Sexism and Making a Nonwhite Spider-Man | Abraham Riesman at Vulture (May 2): “When you become the writer of Spider-Man, all of a sudden, every day, every week, every month, someone of color — all different races — comes up to you and tells you, “Spider-Man was my favorite and this is why,” and then I hear a version of this story: “My friends, when I was a kid, wouldn’t let me be Superman, wouldn’t let me be Batman, because of my skin color. But I could always be Spider-Man, and Spider-Man became my favorite. As a little kid, I didn’t even understand why he was my favorite, but it was because anybody could be Spider-Man under that costume, because it was head-to-toe.” That’s not why we created a Spider-Man who’s a person of color, but afterwards, I was like, “Oh man, this was subconsciously why we did it.””
  • Silence Is Not Synonymous With Uproar: A Response To John C. Wright | foz meadows (May 7): “So, author John C. Wright wrote a thing on the evils of political correctness in SFF [..] Let me show you the problem I’m having. [..] You cannot state, as your opening premise, that SFF fandom is being handicapped by silence and an unwillingness to speak out, and then support that premise by stating the exact polar opposite: that there has, in your own words, been vocal uproar.”
  • Don’t Be a Dick (Or 15 Great Sounding SFF Novels Available in 2014) | Lady Business (April 24): “Dude makes a list of 13 books that demonstrate why 2014 is going to be a banner year for fantasy novels. List contains 12 books by men and a book by a lady which has been pushed back to 2015. Okay then. I decided to fight books with books. Here’s a list of 15 SFF books by women that I’m excited to see published in 2014.”
  • The Trouble With Wonder Woman | Julia Lepetit and Andrew Bridgman at Dorkly (May 6)[Online Comic] “I’m just sick of it! They make a bunch of Batman movies, then a Green Lantern movie, and a Superman movie. Thought I’d be next – but nope – Batman again. [...] I’m one of the three biggest DC heroes in history!”

And now some links from our regular linkspam:

  • Is the Internet Intrinsically Sexist? | Laurie Penny at The Debrief (May 8): “Teenage girls are a perennial target of technological concern-trolling – ‘what will this weirdscape of social sexting, selfies and outraged hashtags mean for their fragile pubescent morality?’ – but, in this instance, the concern is far from baseless.”
  • Approaching Conferences From a Different Angle | satifice (April 28): “If you say you want or encourage diversity in your CFP, but nowhere do you say that diverse applicants will receive support to attend, you don’t want poor people to attend. Now, I’m sure that some people are thinking “well, if it is a professional conference, what poor people?”, which is disingenous particularly for acdemic related conferences [...] Moreover, are we really going to ignore the intersections of poverty with disability, race, gender, and other axes of oppression? If you experience just one type of oppression, your chances of being poor are higher. If you experience multiple axes of oppression, these chances only compound and increase.”
  • If it Doesn’t Exist, Build it: An Interview With Jasper Nance | Alison Dorantes-Garcia at Huffington Post (May 5): “Alison: Something that initially discouraged me from attending hackerspaces was the lack of people who I could relate to and identify with. For a while I didn’t see many women, queer identified people, people of color, or working-class people. Did you ever feel any trepidation coming into hackerspaces, and if so, how did you deal with it? What advice would you give to a new (potentially shy) person going to a hackerspace? JN: Have a project, and ask for help! Don’t go into [a hackerspace] with any expectations of what other people are doing or think of you. If you ask a lot of questions, you would be surprised how nice and helpful some people can be at hackerspaces.”
  • Ally Smells: Fear of Speaking Up | Julie Pagano (May 3): “An analogy might help here. Imagine if someone came upon your open source project, didn’t check your README or contributor guidelines, did no background research, and demanded you add a bunch of features that made no sense or have already been discussed ad nauseam. You’d be annoyed. Some people might be kind and discuss it with them. Some might gently point them at documentation. Others would tell them to RTFM (read the fucking manual). Now imagine this happens on your project every day or even multiple times a day. Over time, the RTFM response becomes more common as people run out of patience and energy.”
  • It’s Different for Girls | Heidi Roizen at Advanetures in Entrepreneurship (May 3): “It pains and somewhat embarrasses me that I am not recommending calling out bad behavior and shaming the individual or individuals responsible.  In a perfect world people would have to account for their behavior.  But as an entrepreneur who spent years in a daily battle for existence, I did not feel like I could afford the hit I’d take in exposing these incidents.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Linkspam considered harmful (7 May 2014)

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

What’s linkspam got to do with it? (2 May 2014)

  • The Fantasy and Abuse of the Manipulable User, by Betsy Haibel | Model View Culture: “Whether these dystopic nightmares come upon us or not, the current situation – in which users’ consent is routinely violated, and in which these violations of consent are normalized into invisibility – is not acceptable in an ethical industry. I call on my fellow tech workers to actively resist any definition of “success” which requires them to ignore or violate users’ boundaries, and to build products that value enthusiastic consent over user manipulation.”
  • Toxic Until Proven Healthy — Medium: “Similarly, women (or otherwise marginalized people) thinking about employment with a tech firm know that many firms are toxic — they don’t even have the statistical comfort of knowing that it’s only one in twenty. (Indeed, anecdote suggests that it’s far more than five percent.) … It’s a small wonder that many, when faced with the risk of that commitment, choose to assume that company cultures are toxic until proven healthy. It’s a small wonder that many choose to leave the industry rather than seek out that proof.”
  • Culture Offset Pledge: “We encourage those who can’t move to self-hosting their git projects, now or long-term, to participate in active harm reduction efforts. We specifically encourage individuals and organizations who rely on GitHub for critical infrastructure to begin donating an equal or greater amount of money to projects which work to counter institutional injustice in tech, or which use tech to counter institutional injustice.”
  • I’m Not Mad, Just Disappointed: Where Are The Women of Google’s Project Ara? | Autostraddle: “Not seeing the female Googlers present a project to the press or be interviewed for what they are working on sends a message—this is not for you. It’s not made for you and it’s not an industry for you. The gadgets are the toys for the boys. And frankly, I don’t think that’s the message that Google intends to send. “
  • Sexual harassment in academic philosophy: Truthbomb: “I should’ve never met my hero, because when I did I found out that, just like his mentor (another famous philosopher), he vehemently refused to subject the private sphere to assessments of justice.”
  • Codemancer: A Fantasy Game that Teaches the Magic of Code by Robert Lockhart — Kickstarter: “The goal of the game is to be as broad and inclusive as possible.  A gender-neutral fantasy setting, a female protagonist, a narrative backbone, and a language designed for accessibility; these are all ways to knock down barriers that prevent some kids from engaging with programming.  When everybody is making technology, the technology they make will be for everybody.”
  • Julie Pagano – I Support Speakers and So Can You: “Several people have asked me about the Tech Conf Speaker Support of Awesomness speaking support group that I run. I am sharing some information about what we do in the hopes that others might join us or create groups of their own.”
  • What (Else) Can Men Do? Grow The Fuck Up. — Medium: “Growing the fuck up means being able to admit that you still have learning to do. It means opening yourself up to narratives in which you are not the expert or the hero. If you believe that your exceptional smarts make you an authority on other people’s experiences and perspectives, then you have some growing the fuck up to do.”
  • When Excellence Isn’t Enough — Medium: “Ignoring the issues is setting yourself up for failure because you don’t want to face the truth. Once you know what’s likely to happen, you can do something about it. You can prepare. Assuming it won’t happen to you is naive. So, I’m going to keep talking about these problems. The more of us who share, the harder it is to ignore. The more of us who share, the more we’ll know about the extent of the problems. The more of us who share, the less burden will fall on each of us.”
  • Consent culture promotion at Penguicon: Penguicon (open source, science fiction, DIY convention May 2-4 near Detroit) put this firm, positive full-page poster-style message about consent culture on the inner cover of their program book. Positive tweets and positive replies ensued. Their Code of Conduct is pretty good, too. http://2014.penguicon.org/code-of-conduct/

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, Delicious or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.