Tag Archives: meta

Some Geek Feminism guest posts of 2010

Here are some of my favourite guest posts of 2010. I’ve organized them by topic, but many of the links appear under more than one category.

On Geek Identity

Critical

Inspirational

Instructional

This is a personal (biased) list of favourites, and I did not consult other Geek Feminism bloggers before making the list. The full list of guest posts are tagged ‘guest post‘.

Earlier this year, I found this interesting drawing at Wrestling Buddies and unicorns: a personal reflection on gender:

A bespectacled white girl wearing jeans and carrying a notebook stands slightly slouched. Slightly frowning, she looks at two white girls in miniskirts and wearing flowers in their hair, caressing a pink unicorn with a female symbol.

In the accompanying text, Nicole Lorenz writes:

Secretly, I wanted to run away with my brother’s Wrestling Buddy (which he still slept with every night), bind my boobs, and live the rest of my life as a boy.

Even more secretly, though, I wanted to be a girl – and not just any girl, but a capital-G, trend-setting, epitome of femininity, datable, respectable Girl. I had the right biological accouterments. I had the right level of socialized self-consciousness. Thanks to my parents’ unintentional sexism around the holidays, I had the right toys in the back of my closet. What was wrong with me that kept me from being a Girl?

Near as I could tell, other girls had access to some sort of mythical well of girliness – some ace in their perfectly pressed sleeves that I didn’t have.

I wanted to provide commentary before posting the image and quote, but I never got around to it, so I want to hear your thoughts.

Wednesday Geek Woman monthly submissions thread (December)

Wednesday Geek Woman is like Ada Lovelace Day every week! Most of our submissions are by guest posters, and we’ll have a post like this once a month to allow you to submit women to the series.

Submit your profile of a geek woman in (hidden) comments here and selected ones will be posted (perhaps lightly edited) on Wednesdays. Here’s what to include:

  1. Optional: a quick one sentence bio paragraph about yourself, with any links you want. For example: Mary is a humble geek blogger and you can find her at <a href="http://geekfeminism.org/">geekfeminism.org</a&gt; Notes:
    • if this is missing, you will be assumed to want to be anonymous. This applies even if you put a name and URL in the comment field.
    • don’t feel pressured into revealing things about yourself you don’t want to. A pseudonymous, mysterious, vague or absent bio is fine.
  2. Compulsory: two or more parapraphs describing your geek woman, ideally including why you admire her in particular.
  3. Optional: links to her biography, her Wikipedia page, and so on.
  4. Optional: agreement that your post can be used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (posts that have this can be used in the Geek Feminism wiki).

See previous posts for examples.

Here’s a form you could copy and paste into comments:

My bio (one sentence only, optional):

Name or pseudonym of the geek woman I am submitting:

My post about this woman (two or more paragraphs):

Links to this woman elsewhere (optional):

[Please delete this line if you don't agree!] I agree to licence my post under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported.

Notes on things we do welcome:

  • a broad definition of ‘geek’: crafters, writers, community organisers, scientists, hackers and creators all welcome
  • profiles submitted by anyone, including men
  • multiple submissions by the same person are fine, so if you submitted last time, or you’ve already submitted this time, no problem!
  • famous geek women: no geek woman is too well-known for this series at this point (unless we’ve featured her before). If more than one person submits the same woman to this round, their profiles will be combined.
  • we’d prefer living or historical women, fictional women will be occasionally accepted but won’t be the main feature
  • it’s fine to profile a woman who uses a pseudonym
  • you’re welcome to submit your writing that’s been published somewhere in the past (as long as you kept the copyright), for example, an Ada Lovelace Day post you made. If your piece has appeared at another URL, please give us that URL.

We may not publish your profile if it falls into these categories:

  • there are lots of geek women past and present, so for now we will not be re-posting a woman subject who has already been featured. See previously posted women.
  • profiles of women who don’t have some kind of public profile, which might include things like a public blog, a professional homepage with a professional bio, an academic homepage listing her publications, a Wikipedia page with her biography, may not be accepted. We don’t want to highlight someone who’d rather not have a Web presence.
  • per How Not to Do Ada Lovelace Day, profiles of women focussed on them being a supportive life-helper to a man geek will not be accepted (collaborative geeking with men of course accepted)
  • this really shouldn’t need to be said, but your post should be about the woman’s geeking, not about her appearance or personal life

Want some inspiration? Check the Geek Feminism wiki for women in science, women in computer science, women in Open Source and other women in geek culture collections.

Wednesday Geek Woman monthly submissions thread (November)

Wednesday Geek Woman is like Ada Lovelace Day every week! Most of our submissions are by guest posters, and we’ll have a post like this once a month to allow you to submit women to the series.

Submit your profile of a geek woman in (hidden) comments here and selected ones will be posted (perhaps lightly edited) on Wednesdays. Here’s what to include:

  1. Optional: a quick one sentence bio paragraph about yourself, with any links you want. For example: Mary is a humble geek blogger and you can find her at <a href="http://geekfeminism.org/">geekfeminism.org</a&gt; (if this is missing, you will be assumed to want to be anonymous!)
  2. Compulsory: two or more parapraphs describing your geek woman, ideally including why you admire her in particular.
  3. Optional: links to her biography, her Wikipedia page, and so on.
  4. Optional: agreement that your post can be used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (posts that have this can be used in the Geek Feminism wiki).

See previous posts for examples.

Here’s a form you could copy and paste into comments:

My bio (one sentence only, optional):

Name or pseudonym of the geek woman I am submitting:

My post about this woman (two or more paragraphs):

Links to this woman elsewhere (optional):

[Please delete this line if you don't agree!] I agree to licence my post under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported.

Notes on things we do welcome:

  • a broad definition of ‘geek’: crafters, writers, community organisers, scientists, hackers and creators all welcome
  • profiles submitted by anyone, including men
  • multiple submissions by the same person are fine, so if you submitted last time, or you’ve already submitted this time, no problem!
  • famous geek women: no geek woman is too well-known for this series at this point (unless we’ve featured her before). If more than one person submits the same woman to this round, their profiles will be combined.
  • we’d prefer living or historical women, fictional women will be occasionally accepted but won’t be the main feature
  • it’s fine to profile a woman who uses a pseudonym
  • you’re welcome to submit your writing that’s been published somewhere in the past (as long as you kept the copyright), for example, an Ada Lovelace Day post you made. If your piece has appeared at another URL, please give us that URL.

We may not publish your profile if it falls into these categories:

  • there are lots of geek women past and present, so for now we will not be re-posting a woman subject who has already been featured. See previously posted women.
  • profiles of women who don’t have some kind of public profile, which might include things like a public blog, a professional homepage with a professional bio, an academic homepage listing her publications, a Wikipedia page with her biography, may not be accepted. We don’t want to highlight someone who’d rather not have a Web presence.
  • per How Not to Do Ada Lovelace Day, profiles of women focussed on them being a supportive life-helper to a man geek will not be accepted (collaborative geeking with men of course accepted)
  • this really shouldn’t need to be said, but your post should be about the woman’s geeking, not about her appearance or personal life

Want some inspiration? Check the Geek Feminism wiki for women in science, women in computer science, women in Open Source and other women in geek culture collections.

New feature: Wednesday Geek Woman

Leigh mentioned off-blog that she wished it was Ada Lovelace Day all the time around here… why not? Let’s run a profile of a geek woman on Wednesdays! And I have to say, this seems like an ideal job for… guest posters!

Submit your profile of a geek woman in (hidden) comments here and selected ones will be posted (perhaps lightly edited) on Wednesdays. Here’s what to include:

  1. Optional: a quick one sentence bio paragraph about yourself, with any links you want. For example: Mary is a humble geek blogger and you can find her at <a href="http://geekfeminism.org/">geekfeminism.org</a&gt; (if this is missing, you will be assumed to want to be anonymous!)
  2. Compulsory: two or more parapraphs describing your geek woman, ideally including why you admire her in particular.
  3. Optional: links to her biography, her Wikipedia page, and so on.
  4. Optional: agreement that your post can be used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (posts that have this can be used in the Geek Feminism wiki).

Here’s a form you could copy and paste into comments:

My bio (one sentence only, optional):

Name or pseudonym of the geek woman I am submitting:

My post about this woman (two or more paragraphs):

Links to this woman elsewhere (optional):

[Please delete this line if you don't agree!] I agree to licence my post under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported.

Note the following:

  • our definition of ‘geek’ is broad: crafters, writers, community organisers, scientists, hackers and creators all welcome
  • anyone is welcome to submit profiles, including men
  • we’d prefer living or historical women, fictional women will be occasionally accepted but won’t be the main feature
  • profiles of women who don’t have some kind of public profile, which might include things like a professional homepage with a professional bio, an academic homepage listing her publications, a Wikipedia page with her biography, may not be accepted. We don’t want to highlight someone who’d rather not have a Web presence.
  • no geek woman is too well-known for this series at this point. If more than one person submits the same woman, their profiles will be combined.
  • per How Not to Do Ada Lovelace Day, profiles of women focussed on them being a supportive life-helper to a man geek will not be accepted (collaborative geeking with men of course accepted)
  • this really shouldn’t need to be said, but your post should be about the woman’s geeking, not about her appearance or personal life

Open thread: om nom nom… circuitry

It’s time for another Geek Feminist party! This party is in honour of our new blogger Courtney, who also writes for From Austin to A&M. You might also remember Courtney from Amanda Hess’s interview at The Sexist. She guest-posted here in September.

Courtney, I hope you enjoy this edible circuit, at least to look at!

555 LED flasher 1: edible model of an electrical circuit

"555 LED flasher 1" by Windell Oskay, CC BY

Got any geek foodstuffs to share with Courtney?

This is also an open thread for discussion of older threads, threads you’d like to see, links you’d like to share, or other topics of your choice.

Nominate guest posts for Geek Feminism

We’d love to feature more guest posts on Geek Feminism, and we accept proposals at any time. But relying on self-nominations from our core audience, women, is problematic due to social training against self-promotion.

So I want to try something new: nominate a guest post!

Here’s how it works:

  1. you, the reader, think of a blog post you’ve seen elsewhere, published since July 1 2010, that you would like to see appear on geekfeminism.org
  2. ask the author if they are happy to be nominated (this is very important: please do not put us in the position of approaching authors cold)
  3. once they’ve agreed, leave a link to the post, and, if possible, an email address or contact method for its author, in comments here. If you like, you can also leave a reason, for example “Geek Feminism has never covered horror fandom” or “Geek Feminism has never featured a post about South American cons” or “this is the best writer living” or just “best thing I’ve read today!”.

You absolutely can nominate your own writing as well.

Comments will be private on this post. Posts selected for guest-posting will go up, with re-confirmation from the author, and we will do a linkspam containing remaining ones of interest.

We’re primarily interested in cross-posts from smaller blogs, in order to introduce our readers to sites they don’t know of yet, and to introduce writers to a larger readership. But if the author of a piece on a widely read website wants it to appear here, we’ll certainly consider it.

Some information about our blog, and about guest posting, especially if you’ve been pointed here because you’ve never seen our blog before but someone wants to nominate your post:

  • What is our blog about? From our About page: The Geek Feminism blog exists to support, encourage, and discuss issues facing women in geek communities, including science and technology, gaming, SF fandom, and more. (Yes, we take a broad view of geekdom.)
  • Can non-feminists guest post? We will decide on a case-by-case basis. There are plenty of critiques of feminism by women and social justice activists, we are interested in these. Standard anti-feminist or relating-to-women 101 material (has feminism gone too far? how can geek men get a girlfriend?) is unlikely to be chosen.
  • Can non-geeks guest post? Non-geek critiques of geekdom might well be chosen, as might posts by ex-geeks. If the post is not in some way concerned with geeking, being geeky, geek interests, etc, then it probably won’t be chosen.
  • Who decides? The current stable of front-page posters, probably I myself will do the bulk of the work on this. I’m not the best and fairest (I’m also not the prettiest and I’m still not king), but I will try.
  • Am I going to become rich and famous? Possibly, but not by posting here. Posts on the Geek Feminism blog receive somewhere between 500 to 30000 page views, averaging perhaps 1500. We do not pay guest (or regular!) posters.
  • How will comments work? Comments will be open here. You won’t be able to moderate them yourself, they’ll be moderated according to our usual policy and we’ll contact you for any line-ball calls.
  • Can I be anonymous or pseudonymous? You can be pseudonymous (your guest post can appear with a made up or non-legal name), but you can’t use something as generic as either ‘Anon’ or ‘Anonymous’.
  • Will you link back to my blog? Yep, all guest posts will have a little intro bio and a link back to the original post too, unless the author doesn’t want that..
  • Can I edit my post for your site? We obviously can’t stop you (we aren’t going to publish without your permission!) but it’s surprising how often this turns into the guest post that never happens. We encourage you to allow us to post as it originally appeared, perhaps with a short explanation at the start to give context. This is not a super-polished professionally edited website either.

Nominations will be taken until comments on this post automatically close in a fortnight. You are welcome to ask to guest post your own writing here at any time, contact us via an open thread.

Open thread: hello newcomers

Let’s have a party. A better party than this party:

A monochrome unhappy looking woman surrounded by colourful balloons

Pity Party by Evil Erin on Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution

Several bloggers got keys to the Geek Feminism front page lately: Kylie of PodBlack Cat, Steph of 天高皇ä¼é¹…è¿œ and vegan about town and Restructure! of Restructure!. Welcome to them, you’ll see them posting as and when they have time and inspiration, like the rest of us.

Two champage glasses, filled with confetti, being clinked in front of a brightly coloured background

Happy Party People Toasting Cheers Holding Champagne Glasses by D Sharon Pruitt on Flickr, Creative Commons Attribution

Let’s add to the party here. Are you reading any new blogs with exciting geek feminist content? Are you yourself new here and want to say hi? Come on in. This is also an open thread, in which you can discuss older posts, ask questions, tell stories, or anything else that takes your fancy.

Call for guest posts: appearance/presentation issues

Some comments on both Kylie’s post and Terri’s latest post suggest that this blog should really is overdue to host discussions on geek women who are oppressed or trapped by or feeling policed about issues to do with: body image, femininity, gender presentation and similar, or who want to question and deconstruct them, or opt-out.

I know it’s a cop-out to say “we’d welcome guest posts”, but here’s why I feel it’s appropriate in this case: our bloggers who are most sensitive to these issues from personal experience aren’t able to be public about it in this venue at this time, or don’t feel that they can deal with the issue sensitively enough or analytically enough for a satisfying respectful discussion with others. So maybe I should say: we need guest posts to address these issues in a satisfying way, and we’re sorry that we can’t properly address it otherwise (at this time, at least).

If you would like to guest-post on this issue, leave a comment here or on the latest Open thread (you’re always welcome to offer a guest post on an Open thread). Otherwise if you’d like to share links, analysis and resources on these issues, or offer shorter comments, or angles that you’d like addressed on this blog by other writers, please comment.

“Ask a Geek Feminist” status

Just a quick note on the Ask a Geek Feminist series, since people are asking. We’re nearly done with the first round: there’s just one more question I want to try and answer myself. The first round was very successful, many thanks to everyone who asked questions and helped out with answers.

Questions aren’t currently open: the series won’t run on a continuous basis because it’s a fair bit of work anonymising and filtering the questions and coordinating answers and such. But it will definitely run again, we’ll be open for questions at the end of May. In the meantime, don’t forget that our latest Open thread is always there for anything you want to discuss.

If there’s anything you’d recommend we add or change for the next round of “Ask a Geek Feminist”, please let me know.

Meetup in Sydney, Australia

Although we’re not as bad as the San Franciscans, Sydneysiders (myself and Melissa) comprise a disproportionate slice of the Geek Feminist Hive Vagina. But as powerful as we are, we can only become more powerful when allied with Hoydens About Town, so… let’s picnic together.

We’re currently organising the picnic for a weekend day in late May. Head on over to Hoyden if you’re coming along and let us know your preferred date.

If anyone is interested in organising an informal meetup in their own city, I suggest posting to an open thread to see if there’s any interest and going from there. I’m happy to post your plans on the front page here once finalised. (At some point that fails to scale, but we’ll worry about it if it happens.)

Comments are closed on this post, if coming to the Sydney meetup, please comment at Hoyden.