Buffy the Linkspam Slayer

  • Anita Sarkeesian explains why she canceled USU lecture | Salt Lake City Tribune (October 16): “A nationally known feminist media critic said Wednesday that “it would be irresponsible” to give a lecture amidst mass shooting threats at Utah State University, knowing that police would not screen for weapons at the door. In a phone interview from San Francisco, Anita Sarkeesian said she canceled Wednesday’s lecture not because of three death threats — one of which promised “the deadliest school shooting in American history” — but because firearms would be allowed in spite of the threats.”
  • When gun rights trump public safety | Mary Elizabeth Williams (October 15): “It’s one thing to accept and understand that plenty of reasonable and responsible people own guns and that is their constitutional right. It is another to be so outrageously afraid of legitimate and sane restrictions that you have a situation in which it is entirely permissible to carry a loaded weapon into an event that carries a threat that the people attending it will “die screaming.””
  • The Threats Against Anita Sarkeesian Expose The Darkest Aspects of Online Misogyny | Maureen Ryan (October 15): “The question that’s been haunting many observers for weeks is now right out in the open in the wake of the latest threats leveled at Sarkeesian: Is someone going to have to die for things to change?”
  • #Gamergate Trolls Aren’t Ethics Crusaders; They’re a Hate Group | Jezebel (October 13): “I set about locking down accounts, emailing professors, contacting campus safety, and calling family. It was an exhausting process, but I considered it necessary. The attack could get out of hand. I mentioned offhand to my sister, about two hours in, that “it was getting to be my turn anyways,” to nonchalantly minimize my hurt. That was the moment I broke down. I realized just how much I’d internalized the presumed process: if you’re even asking about equality or diversity in games, being shouted down in a traumatizing manner is now a mandatory step that you have to sit back and endure.”
  • Sweatin’ the Small Stuff, of, Beware Your Throwaway Jokes About Middle-Aged Women in Magic | One General to Rule them All (October 14): “I dare Wizards to give us a major female Magic character (read: Planeswalker) in the next couple of sets who doesn’t have a body that wouldn’t look out of place on a runway or the cover of Playboy. Tamiyo, the Moon Sage was a great start, but that was three blocks ago. Hell, at this point, I’ll take more than one female Planeswalker per set.”
  • AdaCamp: Spending Time with Women in Open Source and Technology | Zara Rahman (October 13): “There were some sessions that really opened my eyes to another area of this ‘open’ bubble- for example, talking about women in open source. Most of the women there were coders, who had contributed to open source code projects; and despite my having read accounts of abuse and harassment within the open source community fairly regularly before, the severity of the situations they face, really hit home for me during this session.
  • Ada Lovelace Day: Meet the 6 women who gave you ‘the computer’ | The Register (October 14): “All six are now sadly no longer with us – Bartik was the last to pass away. But their achievements were profound, not just in terms of inadvertently cementing the name “computer”. In the absence of manuals literally working out how to use this giant, the team of six installed computer programs working from sheets of paper, nimbly unplugging and replugging a rat’s nest of cables and resetting switches.”
  • Don’t Be Fooled by Apple and Facebook, Egg Freezing Is Not a Benefit | The Daily Beast (October 15): “Of all the women Snyder surveyed, nearly 90 percent of them said they did not plan on returning to the tech industry in the future. The incompatibility between motherhood and tech, it seems, runs far deeper than the timing of pregnancy alone. And the problem is so severe that the women who leave almost never want to come back. In this context, the decision to cover egg freezing reads as Silicon Valley at its most typical, deploying a hasty technological stopgap for a cultural problem.”
  • Tech’s Meritocracy Problem | Medium (October 10): “Engineers love to be skeptics — it’s time to bring our skepticism to the concept of meritocracy. If we can be skeptical enough about our own ability to detect merit, and balance it with more objective measurement or outright mitigatory adjustments — we’ll come closer to resembling an actual meritocracy.”
  • HERoes: Genevieve Valentine | Comicosity (October 2): “From journalist to award winning novelist, Genevieve Valentine is now channeling her inner crime boss. She is providing a new voice to a suited up Selina Kyle, starting with this month’s issue of Catwoman. She tells Comicosity about switching the role of female characters in comics and the importance of reader perspective while consuming.”
  •  Comic Books are Still Made by Men, For Men, and About Men | FiveThirtyEight (October 13): “But these recent advancements don’t make up for the fact that women have been ignored in comic books for decades. And they still don’t bring women anywhere close to parity: Females make up about one in four comic book characters. Among comic-creators, the numbers are even more discouraging. Tim Hanley, a comics historian and researcher, analyzes who’s behind each month’s batch of releases, counting up writers, artists, editors, pencilers and more. In August, Hanley found that men outnumbered women nine-to-one behind the scenes at both DC and Marvel.”
  • Life, Engineered: How Lynn Conway reinvented her world and ours | University of Michigan (October 8): “Ten years earlier, Conway had been one of the first Americans to undergo a modern gender transition. It had cost her a job and her family. Once she established herself as a woman, she kept the past a secret. Conway stayed behind the scenes as much as she could. As a result, so did many of her achievements.”

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Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

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