Et tu, linkspam? (24 July 2015)

  • 25 Ways To Dress Like A Tech Employee | Buzzfeed: “There’s a persistent stereotype that people who work with technology are all dudes in hoodies or free company t-shirts, with zero interest in personal style or fashion. We see it in everything from Microsoft ad campaigns to the way tech companies are shown in television and movies. In my experience, I’ve worked with many people who are just as interested in style as they are technology. So I decided to ask my coworkers on BuzzFeed’s tech team to show me how to dress like a tech employee, and this is what happened…”
  • The kick-ass women of ‘Sense8′ make it best new show on TV | Reel Girl: “Last night, after my husband and I finished watching the last episode of ‘Sense 8,’ I rushed to the computer, Googling the show to see when to expect season 2. Maybe never! Wait, what? According to Think Progress and other sources, the diverse show featuring eight characters from different countries around the world may not be appealing enough to white males. Main characters also include a trans woman and a gay man.”
  • This Ruling Could Change Online “Free Speech” Forever | The Daily Beast: [CW: online harassment] “The spirit of “free speech” is put above freedom from harassment, bullying, or shaming. And it’s having horrific results—leaving jobs, avoiding careers, even contemplating suicide. The response from abusers and apologists is to “grow a thicker skin.” That “this is the Internet.” But it’s not. It’s the Internet as abusers want it. We should change that.”
  • The World’s Most Popular Video Game Fights Racist Harassment With Artificial Intelligence | Tech.mic: “They built a system called the Tribunal, a public case log of files where players could review reported instances of racism, sexism and homophobia, then vote on whether or not they warranted action. After 100 million votes were cast, the team had a usable database of what their community considers an abusive behavior. Then, they turned over that knowledge to their machine-learning algorithm and set it to work dealing with instances of abuse.”
  • At Comic-Con, It Feels Like the Year of the Woman | NYTimes.com: “Quite a few panels reflected this variety and grappled with its implications. Nobody is suggesting that a utopian age of sexual and racial equality has dawned in San Diego or anywhere else. The default Comic-Con panelist is still a white man, but it does seem that more of an effort has been made to correct this lazy lopsidedness here than in, say, the Hollywood studios a few hours up the freeway. If the entertainment business is still dominated by interlocking old-boy networks — in the movie studios, the bigger comic-book publishers, the television networks and among the writers, artists and directors those entities employ — the audience is challenging that status quo.”
  • The Women Who Rule Pluto | The Atlantic: “For all the firsts coming out of the New Horizons mission—color footage of Pluto, photos of all five of its moons, and flowing datastreams about Pluto’s composition and atmosphere—there’s one milestone worth noting on Earth: This may be the mission with the most women in NASA history.”
  • Listening, Being Heard | E. Catherine Tobler: “Writers like Weir — male, white, on top of the NYT Bestseller lists, movie deals, a break out book — are in an amazing position to boost voices that are not like their own. They have the ability to lift others up. And time after time, they mention work that is exactly like their own. Authors who mirror their own selves”
  • The trouble with jokes about girls | Times Higher Education: “There are many aspects to this story, but I want here to focus on just one of them: whether construing a sexist comment as a joke changes how we evaluate it. I am not so much concerned with the specifics of this case but rather by a more general issue: the division between those, like me, who think that the “joke” status of a disparaging comment is irrelevant, and those who think that whether someone is joking or not is a game-changer.”
  • ‘A national hero’: psychologist who warned of torture collusion gets her due | Law | The Guardian: “Jean Maria Arrigo’s inbox is filling up with apologies. For a decade, colleagues of the 71-year-old psychologist ignored, derided and in some cases attacked Arrigo for sounding alarms that the American Psychological Association was implicated in US torture. But now that a devastating report has exposed deep APA complicity with brutal CIA and US military interrogations – and a smear campaign against Arrigo herself – her colleagues are expressing contrition.”
  • @EricaJoy’s salary transparency experiment at Google (with tweets) |_danilo · Storify: “The world didn’t end. Everything didn’t go up in flames because salaries got shared. But shit got better for some people.”
  • How to Deter Doxxing | Nieman Reports: “If I learned one thing from my ordeal it’s that doxxing can happen to anyone, at any time, for nearly any reason. But awareness of the risks—and effective strategies to mitigate them—too often come from bad experiences rather than preparation. When I was doxxed, the person who understood the most about what happened was the Domino’s delivery guy. As soon as Twitter was mentioned, he knew exactly what I was experiencing. Now it’s time for reporters and editors to know just as much.”
  • Read This Letter From Scientists Accusing Top Publisher Of Sexism | BuzzFeed News: “More than 600 scientists and their supporters have signed an open letter to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), criticizing four recent events that “hinder the advancement of underrepresented groups” in science, technology, engineering, and math. The letter asks AAAS to “work more diligently” to avoid “harmful stereotypes” when publishing content about minorities, and recommends that its editorial staff undergo diversity training.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

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