A linkspam of Earthsea (22 September 2015)

  • Kate Beaton Talks Superheroes and Brontë Sisters | Vulture: “Beaton soldiers on, and this month, she’s releasing a new strip collection called Step Aside, Pops. It shows her moving into new territory, such as riffs on superhero comics… We caught up with Beaton to talk about giant robots, Tumblr arguments, and historical topics that are just too damn sad for comics.”
  • Outreachy Expands to People of Color Underrepresented in U.S. Tech | Software Freedom Conservancy: : “Outreachy’s expanded program will now include residents and nationals of the United States of any gender who are Black/African American, Hispanic/Latin@, American Indian, Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander.”
  • Coping Mechanisms and Unlearned Skills | Accidentally in Code: “One of the things I’ve been meditating on since escaping the tech industry is what skills do you not acquire when the main skills you are learning are how to cope in a bad situation? And do you have to unlearn them to go back?”
  • The (Final?) Cost of Ben Radford’s Libel Bullying: About $5K | Skepchick: : “I think there’s a huge public interest in understanding exactly why libel threats are so often successful at censoring speech. In my experience, it comes down to two reasons: the enormous potential cost (both financial and psychological) of going to court, and the slightly lower enormous actual cost (both financial and psychological) of what happens before you even get to a courtroom.”
  • Why the ‘Kitchen of the Future’ Always Fails Us | Eater: “Around the corner, in the kitchen, our lovely future wife is making dinner. She always seems to be making dinner. Because no matter how far in the future we imagine, in the kitchen, it is always the 1950’s, it is always dinnertime, and it is always the wife’s job to make it. Today’s homes of the future are full of incredible ideas and gizmos, but while designers seems happy to extrapolate far beyond what we can do today when it comes to battery life or touch screens, they can’t seem to wrap their minds around any changes happening culturally. In a future kitchen full of incredible technology, why can we still not imagine anything more interesting than a woman making dinner alone?”
  • How Gamergate’s earliest target came to empathize with her abusers | The Verge: “In the months since, Quinn — an indie game developer known best for her cult hit Depression Quest — has spent a lot of time investigating why people who have never met her have devoted so much energy to harassing her. The more she considered the problem, she says, the more she recognized herself in her attackers. And that gave her a new insight into why users of social platforms like Facebook and Twitter are so quick to pick up pitchforks when they perceive an injustice.”
  • Ellen Pao Can Still be a Feminist Hero | Elle: “Maybe somewhere there is a CEO who will really promote women and minorities rather than just talk about it, or a whistleblower who vows not to be chilled by it all. We already know there is discrimination—unless you believe that white men are just better than everyone else, which I don’t. Regardless of any minor victory Pao may have scored here, let’s not forget that it is in the context of conceding defeat. We still have a long, long way to go. Is this the end of the Ellen Pao saga? No—because it’s ours.”
  • Party Like It’s 1995: The Rise and Fall of the Girl Game | Autostraddle: “Once there was a whole movement that wished those same things. The girl game movement was a briefly lived golden era of pink-wrapped PC games made for, and marketed to, young girls… Game developers realized they were missing out on a share of the market, so they went pink and purple (those are the only colors girl children see, you know). Girls’ games were almost all available on CD-rom, based on the idea that girls did not own the consoles that were available in the late 90s.”
  • Kiera Wilmot arrest: Florida teenager reacts to Ahmed Mohamed story | Slate: “I spoke with Wilmot—now 19 and a sophomore at Florida Polytechnic University majoring in mechanical engineering—this morning about Mohamed’s predicament. She said that her first reaction was anger: “I honestly thought, ‘How could this happen to somebody else?’”

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Thanks to everyone who suggested links.