GF classifieds (July, August, and September 2015)

This is another round of Geek feminism classifieds. If you’re looking to hire women, find some people to participate in your study, find female speakers, or just want some like-minded folk to join your open source project, this is the thread for you!

Here’s how it works:

  1. Geeky subjects only. We take a wide view of geekdom, but if your thing isn’t related to an obviously geeky topic, you’ll probably want to give a bit of background on why the readers of Geek Feminism would be interested.
  2. Explain what your project/event/thing is, or link to a webpage that provides clear, informative information about it. Ideally you’ll also explain why geek women might find it particularly awesome.
  3. Explain what you’re looking for. Even if it’s not a job ad, think of it like one: what is the activity/role in question, and what would it involve? What is the profile of people you’re looking for?
  4. GF has international readership, so please be sure to indicate the location if you’re advertising a job position, conference, or other thing where the location matters. Remember that city acronyms aren’t always known world-wide and lots of cities share names, so be as clear as possible! (That is, don’t say “SF[O]” or “NYC” or “Melb”, say “San Francisco, USA”, “New York City, USA” or “Melbourne, Australia”.) And if you can provide travel/relocation assistance, we’d love to know about it.
  5. Keep it legal. Most jurisdictions do not allow you to (eg.) advertise jobs for only people of a given gender. So don’t do that. If you are advertising for something that falls into this category, think of this as an opportunity to boost the signal to women who might be interested.
  6. If you’re asking for participants in a study, please note Mary’s helpful guide to soliciting research participation on the ‘net, especially the “bare minimum” section.
  7. Provide a way for people to contact you, such as your email address or a link to apply in the case of job advertisements. (The email addresses entered in the comment form here are not public, so readers won’t see them.)
  8. Keep an eye on comments here, in case people ask for clarification or more details. (You can subscribe to comments via email or RSS.)

If you’d like some more background/tips on how to reach out to women for your project/event/whatever, take a look at Recruiting women on the Geek Feminism Wiki.)

Good luck!

Feel Like Making Linkspam (26 June 2015)

      • How NASA Broke The Gender Barrier In STEM | Fast Company (June 23): “The convergence of open data and female leadership has the potential to challenge traditional decision making across sectors and facilitate more data-driven and collaborative approaches in creating new ventures and solving problems. Datanauts was born out of NASA’s open-data priorities as a means to bring more women to the open-data table. While the program is intended for women and men, the founding class is made up entirely of women to encourage other female techies and makers to take the “data leap,” as Beth Beck, Open Innovation program manager at NASA’s Office of the Chief Information Officer, calls it. Future classes will include men.”
      • Fuck the Internet Shame Spiral | Gizmodo (June 23): “Once the tone police arrive, we’re no longer talking about how disturbing it is that one of the top scientists in the world thinks women shouldn’t be allowed to work in labs because he might fall in love with them. Instead, we’re talking about whether it’s appropriate for women to mock his comments by posting pictures of themselves on Instagram.”
      • I’m a female scientist, and I agree with Tim Hunt. | Medium (June 14): “Science is based on observations, which are the same thing as universal proof. Even I know that, and I’m just a woman whose brain is filled to capacity with yoga poses and recipes for gluten-free organic soap. Once, I was lured into a trap in the woods because I followed a trail of Sex and the City DVDs for three miles into a covered pit. Do you really think I could do something as complicated as thinking about science?”
      • Journalist Laurie Penny banned from Facebook for using pseudonym | The Guardian (June 24): “Facebook has been accused of putting users at risk “of rape and death threats” by a journalist who was banned from the social networking site for using a pseudonym.Laurie Penny, a contributing editor at the weekly political magazine the New Statesman, who also writes for the Guardian, said she had been kicked off Facebook for using a fake name to avoid being trolled.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

All this and linkspam too (23 June 2015)

  • Women in Animation Offers Dismal Stats on Current State of Affairs, Proposes Paths towards Progress | Women and Hollywood: “Though a study suggested that women make up the majority of students at animation programs today, research compiled by the Animation Guild note that female creatives total only 20% of the workforce. Women make up a scant 10% of animation directors and producers, 17% of writers, 21% of art/designers and 23% of animators. Things are no better in Canada, where women make up 16-18% of animation creatives. “
  • Meet the Woman Helping Gamergate Victims Come Out of the Shadows | Time: “Shannon Sun-Higginson was investigating sexual harassment in gaming before Gamergate was even a thing. She almost single-handedly made GTFO: The Movie, a documentary about women in gaming debuted SXSW in March, stoking an ongoing debate over accusations that gaming culture is sexist. The film was released for the general public on iTunes last week and TIME caught up with Sun-Higginson to talk about the reactions she’s been getting, why gaming matters, and what surprised her about the trolls.”
  • Gender inequality in STEM is very real for Canadian women | Maclean’s: “While we like to think that gender inequality in STEM is old-fashioned and that as a society we’ve made great advances in equal opportunities, the numbers don’t always tell the same tale. The truth is, in Canada at least, very little has changed.”
  • Revenge Porn: A Serious Issue Is Finally Being Taken Seriously | Privacy Perspectives: “On Friday, Google announced it will honor takedown requests in Google Search related to nonconsensual pornography. Shortly after that, Rep. Jackie Speier’s (D-CA) office announced that next month it will introduce federal legislation on revenge porn. And on Sunday night, HBO’s “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver” dedicated most of his episode to cyber-harassment and nonconsensual pornography.”
  • 23 Games from E3 2015 with Badass Playable Female Characters | The Mary Sue: “E3 2015 was one of the best years for playable female characters in recent memory – especially after the bleak, sad stubbly white dude landscape of 2014. This year’s conferences gave us lady protagonists that were not only the traditional elves and clerics, but also engineers, astronauts, tanks, and more. Here are twenty-three games straight from E3 with kick-ass women we can’t wait to play.”

We have a few link trends this week. First off, increasing the visibility of women’s historical contributions to STEM:

  • The women whom science forgot | BBC News: “Many female scientists in the past were not given the credit they deserved for their achievements. As a result, their names have all but disappeared from public consciousness. Here are just a few.”
  • ENIAC Programmers Project: “The ENIAC Programmers Project has been devoted for nearly two decades to researching their work, recording their stories, and seeking honors for the ENIAC Six—the great women of ENIAC.”
  • Lady Science no. 9: Women in Computing, Part 1: “Silicon Valley (and The Social Network and many popular books on the history of Silicon Valley) would have us believe that women and computing generally do not – and have not mixed. Let’s set the record straight.”

Continued response to Tim Hunt’s comments about women in science:

  • Enough talk. There are ways we can help women in science now | Comment is free | The Guardian: “So what can you do? Whether you’re a parent, a teacher, a researcher or a professor, I am convinced there is some action you can take to make a difference and help future generations of women to thrive in science. That way, we can ensure women fulfil their potential and are able to use their talents fully for the good of us all.”
  • Sexist Scientist: I Was Being ‘Honest’ | The Daily Beast: “Some media organizations have stepped in to defend Hunt’s comments, which he now claims were an attempt to be entertaining. As a co-panelist sitting next to him at the luncheon, I heard a different story. His speech, he told me, was rooted in “honesty,” not humor.”
  • “Just” Joking? Sexist Talk in Science | PLOS Blogs: “The parts of his statements that portray women as difficult in the scientific workplace because of gender characteristics are sexist. That’s not dependent at all on whether the statement is a joke or not. If it’s not said with malice, then it’s just less hostile: but it’s still sexist.”

A couple interconnected pieces about women’s participation in Magic: the Gathering competitions:

  • Women In Magic: the Gathering | StarCityGames.com: “There are barriers to women playing competitive Magic – unnecessary and difficult issues that prevent potential competitors from ever leaving the “kitchen table” – and these are issues we can and should address.”
  • I’m not sure how much you may want to debate this…: “That’s what this conversation is about. Women make up 38% of Magic players yet this isn’t remotely reflected in in store play. Why? What factors are causing this to be so? And if it’s going to change, it requires those of us in the majority to stand up and say, “You know what? This isn’t right. We need to change this.””

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Consider the linkspams, how they grow (16 June 2015)

  • The unseen women scientists behind Tim Hunt’s Nobel prize | The Guardian: “It is obvious that his comments were sexist, but few people could recognise the names or faces of the women he has so thoughtlessly brushed aside. Even in his inadequate apology, he neglected to mention any women scientists who have impressed him during his career, choosing instead to justify himself with unsolicited details about his love life. Many have railed against Hunt’s casual chauvinism, without questioning why positive remarks about women are still missing. Would such comments be irrelevant? Unless we acknowledge the stories of women he has forgotten, a negative portrayal of women once again takes centre stage.”
  • #TooGayForWifi: Please Stop Blocking Gay Websites | Autostraddle: “In the past year, I’ve been collecting reports of places where Autostraddle cannot be viewed. They include but are not limited to: airports, government agencies (like certain DMVs), car dealerships, gyms and schools. I’ve also been researching which filtration companies these places are using and what filtration categories they’re making available to their clients. I’ve come to two conclusions: most entities aren’t censoring gay content on purpose, they’ve just literally never thought of it; and filters, in most cases, are a waste of resources and a bad idea in general.”
  • I Stand with Irene Gallo | Bedside Notepad: “I’m done with guys being all, oh, women in geekdom get harassed and doxxed and threatened when they speak up about sexism? I HAD NO IDEA. I don’t believe your ignorance any more. You are lying. You are lying because you don’t want to be bothered. Because the serial harasser you employed was a guy you kinda liked.”
  • Female Comics Experts and Pros to Host “Men In Comics” Panel at This Month’s Indy PopCon | The Mary Sue: “We at The Mary Sue were none too happy when we heard about the all-male “Women in Comics” panel at this year’s Denver Comic Con. Apparently, we weren’t the only ones. Racebending.com’s Gabrial Canada sees how underrepresented women are in all aspects of geek culture and decided to respond to that Denver Comic Con panel by creating this “Men in Comics” panel featuring all women at this month’s Indy PopCon in Indianapolis.”
  • These Women Scientists Know Exactly How #DistractinglySexy They Really Are: “Efforts to not only make women in STEM visible, but to further make that visibility positive and inspiring, are therefore crucial. As these Twitter users are showing, female scientists aren’t distractingly sexy — they’re necessary and valuable additions to every lab.”
  • Leveling Both Sides of the Playing Field | Medium: “What if, instead of teaching women that they have to raise their hands to speak at meetings, we taught men to be more reflective and circumspect; instead of telling women to tamp down their emotions at the office, a man was told that he didn’t appear committed enough to the job because he’s never shed tears over it; instead of pushing women to take public credit for their work, we publicly admonish men who don’t properly acknowledge others’ contributions? I was just invited to a seminar on public speaking skills for women — where’s the class on listening skills for men?”
  • I, Too, Left the Tech Industry | Evgenia Got Free: “We are supposed to manage stress without being able to manage the sources of stress: abusive managers, abusive work practices, unfair wages. This tells us that our feelings, and the results of having them, are the problem, but not the things that caused those feelings in the first place.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Linkspams are not the only fruit (12 June 2015)

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

Mad Link: Fury Spam (9 June 2015)

  • Supreme Court Overturns Conviction in Online Threats Case, Citing Intent | The New York Times (June 1): “The Supreme Court on Monday made it harder to prosecute people for threats made on Facebook and other social media, reversing the conviction of a Pennsylvania man who directed brutally violent language against his estranged wife.Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., writing for the majority, said prosecutors must do more than prove that reasonable people would view statements as threats. The defendant’s state of mind matters, the chief justice wrote, though he declined to say just where the legal line is drawn.”
  • Study: half of black and Latina women scientists have been mistaken for admin or custodial staff | Vox (June 4): “personal choices aren’t the only reason women decide to leave STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) careers. The bias they face in the workplace once they enter these jobs plays a huge role, too. And unsurprisingly that bias is especially intense and takes different forms when it comes to women of color.”
  • Event in St Louis June 13: Super Heroines on the Small Screen | Meetup: “50% of the population is female, but did you know only 37% of all lead roles on cable television are women? Be a part of our discussion about the under-representation and portrayal of super heroines in TV through the years. Our panelists will break down popular television shows and examine their representation of women – the good and the bad – through clips and debate.”
  • Silicon Valley startups are obsessed with developing tech to replace their moms | Business Insider (May 10): “Silicon Valley entrepreneurs have millions in funding to spend on startups and maybe tackle world problems. Based on what they’re building though, it kinda looks like they just want their mom around.”
  • So you want to read about…girl superheroes | Austin Public Library (June 2): “So you want to read about girl superheroes? Of course you do! With Black Widow on movie screens and Supergirl about to grace our television screens, it’s no surprise you feel like picking up a comic or two (or ten). Lucky you, Austin Public Library has a whole host of comics featuring awesome ladies to satisfy your reading needs”
  • Better advice for ‘Bothered’ | Science Careers (June 4): CW: Sexual harassment “The deleted Ask Alice post offering advice to “Bothered,” a female postdoc whose male adviser “won’t stop looking down my shirt,” brought a torrent of critical responses. Many critiqued the original advice: “As long as your adviser does not move on to other advances, I suggest you put up with it, with good humor if you can.” Most criticized Science Careers for posting it. And some filled the gap they felt the original post left by offering their own advice to women scientists coping with unwanted attention from a man in a position of power.”
  • Meet Screet, a  Feminist Sexual Health App | Feministing (June 8): “Screet, and other apps like it, demonstrate the exciting innovation that happens when tech start-ups place feminist goals, such as inclusive sexual health, at the center of their mission rather than wait to incorporate these themes later down the product life-line. Hopefully the continued success of this young start-up will inspire other founders, engineers, investors, and users that tech and feminism go along together rather than just ‘leaning-in.’” [Editor’s Note: a reboot of Screet is happening at http://screetreboot.github.io]
  • Apple Finally Puts Women on the Stage | Bloomberg (June 8):  “The fact that Silicon Valley’s biggest companies are starting to give their female employees a chance to be a part of telling their stories seems like progress. But the real achievement will be when it’s not news that women are participating in these kind of events.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

cover of TRADE ME by Courtney Milan

Book Club: Thought experiments around privilege, and more Trade Me thoughts

Apologies for getting this up late; I’ve been travelling back from WisCon (where I also praised Trade Me at length!).

So as you saw in my April post announcing Courtney Milan’s contemporary romance novel Trade Me as a GF book club topic, I love this book for multiple reasons. From here on out I’ll be indulging in spoilers, so, more after the jump!

Continue reading

Harriet the Linkspam (1 June 2015)

  • All the women I know in video games are tired | Boing Boing (May 29): “For the most part, I still have the same job that I have always had (not that I’m not proud of the growth I’ve had within it over the years). For my friends, the Twine revolutionaries and the vocal Tweeters and the other writers, a great act of deception has occurred: We’ve been in the New York Times and been invited to conferences and told that we are Important Voices, doing Important Work, we’ve been on the news at night and in magazines. We are awash in social capital. But none of it translates to real capital.”
  • tim | “Truth is the first casualty of war.” (May 27): “I know how deep the need to know the truth can go when you’re brought up in a world that seems to be built on lies. We as trans people all come from a world like that, even those of us who only have the fuzziest sense early on that we’re being lied to about who we are. To paraphrase (IIRC) Katha Pollitt, social change is made by people who can’t stand the way things are any more. It’s not made by people who are well-served by the world as it is.”
  • Where Are All The WoC Hackers In Movies? | Model View Culture (May 27): “does the film industry believe that all women techies are white? Women programmers are almost never played by black, latina, native or asian women. The film and TV industry sends the message to women of color that we are not hackers, or at least not supposed to be. Casting hacker characters as primarily white men, and sometimes white women, leaves women of color out of the picture. Lack of representation and exposure is one reason why black women make up the lowest percentage of programmers in the tech industry (less than 1%): if you don’t see anyone who looks like you in a particular field or job, you are less likely to venture into it.”
  • Disability in the Dystopian Future of Mad Max: Fury Road | Women Write About Comics (May 28): “Approximately 15% of the world’s population has some kind of disability, but in pop culture people with disabilities are rarely seen: only 1% of characters have some kind of disability in American television shows.”
  • Bias against women in science persists, even in egalitarian societies | Ars Technica (May 29): “the researchers found that both implicit and explicit measures suggested a strong association between men and science in all 66 nations included in the study. These implicit stereotypes persisted even in countries where women make up approximately half of the STEM workforce, though explicit biases are weaker in these countries, which suggests that simply educating or employing women in science-related fields is not adequate to break down these long-held biases.”
  • TED turns away mother, baby at conference for women | Mashable (May 29): “A mother and her 5-month-old baby were asked to leave TEDWomen, a conference meant to celebrate the accomplishments and potential of women and girls around the world.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

We Built This Linkspam on Rock and Roll (28 May 2015)

  • (CW: rape) A Song of Ice and Fire has a rape problem. | tafkar: “George R. R. Martin uses nameless women’s bodies as character development for male antagonists in A Song of Ice and Fire. Rape victims serve as props and set decoration to illustrate a man’s depravity. Social class does not protect them. The only raped women who tell us their tales, either directly through inner monologue or by telling their story to another character, are villains. Despite numerous claims, Martin’s portrayal of rape is not supported by history.”
  • Denver ComicCon Had a Women In Comics Panel With No Women | Comics Alliance: “Certainly men can be part of the conversation about the place of women in comics throughout history and even today. But they should not be the only people speaking, nor should any panels featuring men speaking about women be given a pass because they’re about history and not diversity. Women deserve the right to speak about their own history.”
  • It’d Be Crazy if VC Firms Didn’t Fix Their Gender Problem | WIRED: “Venture capital isn’t just discriminating while cutting itself off from women’s talent, smarts, and insight. It’s denying itself a huge hunk of unclaimed business—which makes venture capital’s vaunted meritocracy pretty unmeritorious.”
  • Ex Machina Has a Serious Fembot Problem | WIRED: “In a way, Garland is right; pure intelligence wouldn’t have a gender any more than it would have a race. But to say that and then place that consciousness into a body that it will immediately recognize its likeness as female negates that point.”
  • (CW: Abuse, suicidal thoughts) On #YesAllWomen, One Year Later | The Toast: “My Twitter mentions were bursting with reasons why I should [die]. I was a man-hater. I was a rabid feminist. I was capitalizing on a tragedy. I was a terrorist in sheep’s clothing. I was a hypocrite. […] I was a Muslim woman who had dared to start a viral hashtag that laid out the fears women faced – while men shamed and accused them of generalizing against an entire gender for the sins of a perceived few. I was the creator of #YesAllWomen, and in that moment, I had no idea what the morning would bring me.”
  • (CW: Screenshots of abusive texts) How I responded to sexism in gaming with empathy – Lilian Chen | TedEd: “Lilian Chen grew up playing Super Smash Brothers Melee. But when her love of the game led her to compete in national tournaments, she noticed a big gender imbalance that brought with it a troubling social dynamic. In this TEDYouth talk, Lilian details her experiences with sexism in the Smash community and how she is now aiming to raise awareness for this topic in a way that doesn’t shame male gamers.”
  • The Avengers’ Black Widow Has a Smurfette Problem | The Atlantic: “But Renner’s “slut” joke isn’t an example of “shipping”—i.e. rooting for a romance to happen. It’s an insistence upon seeing a woman purely in sexual terms. It’s also a rejection of the notion that men and women can have platonic relationships—that Smurfette could just be friends with the other 99 blue people in her village.”

We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.

From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs Basil E. Linkspam (26 May 2015)


We link to a variety of sources, some of which are personal blogs.  If you visit other sites linked herein, we ask that you respect the commenting policy and individual culture of those sites.

You can suggest links for future linkspams in comments here, or by using the “geekfeminism” tag on Pinboard, or Diigo; or the “#geekfeminism” tag on Twitter. Please note that we tend to stick to publishing recent links (from the last month or so).

Thanks to everyone who suggested links.